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  1.  19
    Avoiding Exploitation in Phase I Clinical Trials: More Than Just Compensation.Matt Lamkin & Carl Elliott - 2018 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 46 (1):52-63.
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  2.  23
    Curing the Disobedient Patient: Medication Adherence Programs as Pharmaceutical Marketing Tools.Matt Lamkin & Carl Elliott - 2014 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (4):492-500.
    Pharmaceutical companies have long focused their marketing strategies on getting doctors to write more prescriptions. But they lose billions in potential sales when patients do not take their prescribed drugs. Getting patients to “adhere” to drug therapies that have unpleasant side effects and questionable efficacy requires more than mere ad campaigns urging patients to talk to their doctors. It requires changing patients' beliefs and attitudes about their medications through repeated contact from people patients trust. Since patients do not trust drug (...)
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  3.  7
    Curing the Disobedient Patient: Medication Adherence Programs as Pharmaceutical Marketing Tools.Matt Lamkin & Carl Elliott - 2014 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (4):492-500.
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  4.  79
    Racist Appearance Standards and the Enhancements That Love Them: Norman Daniels and Skin-Lightening Cosmetics.Matt Lamkin - 2011 - Bioethics 25 (4):185-191.
    Darker skin correlates with reduced opportunities and negative health outcomes. Recent discoveries related to the genes associated with skin tone, and the historical use of cosmetics to conform to racist appearance standards, suggest effective skin-lightening products may soon become available. This article examines whether medical interventions of this sort should be permitted, subsidized, or restricted, using Norman Daniels's framework for determining what justice requires in terms of protecting health. I argue that Daniels's expansive view of the requirements of justice in (...)
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  5.  31
    Cognitive Enhancements and the Values of Higher Education.Matt Lamkin - 2012 - Health Care Analysis 20 (4):347-355.
    Drugs developed to treat cognitive impairments are proving popular with healthy college students seeking to boost their focus and productivity. Concerned observers have called these practices a form of cheating akin to athletes’ use of steroids, with some proposing testing students’ urine to deter “academic doping.” The ease with which critics analogize the academic enterprise to competitive sport, and the impulse to crack down on students using study drugs, reflect the same social influences and trends that spur demand for these (...)
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