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Matthew Adamson [7]Matthew Darren Adamson [1]
  1.  54
    Language and Symbolic Power.Ian Buchanan, Pierre Bourdieu, Gino Raymond & Matthew Adamson - 1993 - Substance 22 (2/3):342.
  2.  10
    Global perspectives on science diplomacy: Exploring the diplomacy‐knowledge nexus in contemporary histories of science.Matthew Adamson & Roberto Lalli - 2021 - Centaurus 63 (1):1-16.
    Contemporary scholarship concerning science diplomacy is increasingly taking a historical approach. In our introduction to this special issue, we argue that this approach promises insight into science diplomacy because of the tools historians of science bring to their work. In particular, we observe that not only are historians of science currently poised to chart the diplomatic aspects involved in the transnational circulation of technoscientific knowledge, materials, and expertise. They are ready to bring critical global analysis to an important phenomenon that (...)
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  3.  5
    Friends in fission: US–Brazil relations and the global stresses of atomic energy, 1945–1955.Matthew Adamson & Simone Turchetti - 2021 - Centaurus 63 (1):51-66.
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  4.  11
    Les liaisons dangereuses: resource surveillance, uranium diplomacy and secret French–American collaboration in 1950s Morocco.Matthew Adamson - 2016 - British Journal for the History of Science 49 (1):79-105.
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  5.  5
    Orphaned atoms: The first M oroccan reactor and the frameworks of nuclear diplomacy.Matthew Adamson - 2021 - Centaurus 63 (2):262-276.
    This article examines the attempt by the Kingdom of Morocco—a country of pivotal geopolitical importance in the late 1970s and early 1980s—to secure a research reactor. It finds that by treating that reactor as a diplomatic object, we can observe the different diplomatic frameworks in which that object was conceived of, contextualized, and negotiated. The historical emergence of these frameworks occurred in close relationship with the IAEA, which acted as an intermediary linking various administrations, programs, and countries, including Morocco. In (...)
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  6.  17
    Showcasing the international atom: the IAEA Bulletin as a visual science diplomacy instrument, 1958–1962.Matthew Adamson - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (2):205-223.
    When the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) began operations in 1958, one of its first routine tasks was to create and circulate a brief non-technical periodical. This article analyses the creation of theIAEA Bulletinand its circulation during its first years. It finds that diplomatic imperatives both in IAEA leadership circles and in the networks outside them shaped the form and appearance of the bulletin. In the hands of the IAEA's Division of Public Information, the bulletin became an instrument of science (...)
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  7.  9
    Introduction: Power to the image! Science, technology and visual diplomacy.Simone Turchetti & Matthew Adamson - 2023 - British Journal for the History of Science 56 (2):135-146.
    This special issue explores the power that images with a techno-scientific content can have in international relations. As we introduce the articles in the collection, we highlight how the study of this influence extends current research in the separate (but increasingly interacting) domains of history of science and technology, and political science. We then show how images of different types (photographs, cartoons and plots) can inform inter-state transactions through their public appeal alongside the better-studied dialogic practices of the diplomatic arena. (...)
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