13 found
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  1.  43
    Reasons Probably Won’T Change Your Mind: The Role of Reasons in Revising Moral Decisions.Matthew L. Stanley, Ashley M. Dougherty, Brenda W. Yang, Paul Henne & Felipe De Brigard - 2018 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 147 (7):962-987.
    Although many philosophers argue that making and revising moral decisions ought to be a matter of deliberating over reasons, the extent to which the consideration of reasons informs people’s moral decisions and prompts them to change their decisions remains unclear. Here, after making an initial decision in 2-option moral dilemmas, participants examined reasons for only the option initially chosen(affirming reasons), reasons for only the option not initially chosen (opposing reasons), or reasons for both options. Although participants were more likely to (...)
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  2.  32
    Network Modularity as a Foundation for Neural Reuse.Matthew L. Stanley, Bryce Gessell & Felipe De Brigard - 2019 - Philosophy of Science 86 (1):23-46.
    The neural reuse framework developed primarily by Michael Anderson proposes that brain regions are involved in multiple and diverse cognitive tasks and that brain regions flexibly and dynamically interact in different combinations to carry out cognitive functioning. We argue that the evidence cited by Anderson and others falls short of supporting the fundamental principles of neural reuse. We map out this problem and provide solutions by drawing on recent advances in network neuroscience, and we argue that methods employed in network (...)
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  3. Resistance to Position Change, Motivated Reasoning, and Polarization.Matthew L. Stanley, Paul Henne, Brenda Yang & Felipe De Brigard - forthcoming - Political Behavior.
    People seem more divided than ever before over social and political issues, entrenched in their existing beliefs and unwilling to change them. Empirical research on mechanisms driving this resistance to belief change has focused on a limited set of well-known, charged, contentious issues and has not accounted for deliberation over reasons and arguments in belief formation prior to experimental sessions. With a large, heterogeneous sample (N = 3,001), we attempt to overcome these existing problems, and we investigate the causes and (...)
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  4.  11
    Process-Specific Alliances (PSAs) in Cognitive Neuroscience.Roberto Cabeza, Matthew L. Stanley & Morris Moscovitch - 2018 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 22 (11):996-1010.
  5.  35
    Emotional Intensity in Episodic Autobiographical Memory and Counterfactual Thinking.Matthew L. Stanley, Natasha Parikh, Gregory W. Stewart & Felipe De Brigard - 2017 - Consciousness and Cognition 48:283-291.
  6.  23
    Changes in Global and Regional Modularity Associated with Increasing Working Memory Load.Matthew L. Stanley, Dale Dagenbach, Robert G. Lyday, Jonathan H. Burdette & Paul J. Laurienti - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  7. I’M Not the Person I Used to Be: The Self and Autobiographical Memories of Immoral Actions.Matthew L. Stanley, Paul Henne, Vijeth Iyengar, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Felipe De Brigard - 2017 - Journal of Experimental Psychology. General 146 (6):884-895.
    People maintain a positive identity in at least two ways: They evaluate themselves more favorably than other people, and they judge themselves to be better now than they were in the past. Both strategies rely on autobiographical memories. The authors investigate the role of autobiographical memories of lying and emotional harm in maintaining a positive identity. For memories of lying to or emotionally harming others, participants judge their own actions as less morally wrong and less negative than those in which (...)
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  8.  52
    Perceived Similarity of Imagined Possible Worlds Affects Judgments of Counterfactual Plausibility.Felipe De Brigard, Paul Henne & Matthew L. Stanley - 2021 - Cognition 209:104574.
    People frequently entertain counterfactual thoughts, or mental simulations about alternative ways the world could have been. But the perceived plausibility of those counterfactual thoughts varies widely. The current article interfaces research in the philosophy and semantics of counterfactual statements with the psychology of mental simulations, and it explores the role of perceived similarity in judgments of counterfactual plausibility. We report results from seven studies (N = 6405) jointly supporting three interconnected claims. First, the perceived plausibility of a counterfactual event is (...)
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  9.  5
    Analytic-Thinking Predicts Hoax Beliefs and Helping Behaviors in Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic.Matthew L. Stanley, Nathaniel Barr, Kelly Peters & Paul Seli - forthcoming - Thinking and Reasoning:1-14.
    The COVID-19 outbreak was labeled a global pandemic by the WHO in March of 2020. During that same month, the number of confirmed cases and the death rate grew exponentially in the United States, cr...
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  10.  12
    Modularity in Network Neuroscience and Neural Reuse.Matthew L. Stanley & Felipe De Brigard - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39.
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  11. Remembering Moral and Immoral Actions in Constructing the Self.Matthew L. Stanley, Paul Henne & Felipe De Brigard - forthcoming - Memory and Cognition.
    Having positive moral traits is central to one’s sense of self, and people generally are motivated to maintain a positive view of the self in the present. But it remains unclear how people foster a positive, morally good view of the self in the present. We suggest that recollecting and reflecting on moral and immoral actions from the personal past jointly help to construct a morally good view of the current self in complementary ways. More specifically, across four studies we (...)
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  12.  2
    Structure-Seeking as a Psychological Antecedent of Beliefs About Morality.Matthew L. Stanley, Elizabeth J. Marsh & Aaron C. Kay - 2020 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 149 (10):1908-1918.
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  13.  1
    Students’ Reasoning About Dilemmas in Business Ethics.Matthew L. Stanley & Christopher P. Neck - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics Education 17:5-28.
    Ethics education has become a priority at many business schools. A common pedagogical strategy in business ethics education has been to encourage students to deliberate and reason about cases and dilemmas. However, relatively little is known about how students actually reason, by default, about business ethics cases and dilemmas. In a large-scale study with undergraduate management students, we investigate how students reason about ethical dilemmas in business. Our results suggest that, after making an initial decision in a dilemma, students rarely (...)
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