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  1.  46
    G. Reggi : Aspetti della poesia epica latina. Atti del corso d'aggiornamento per docenti di latino e greco del Canton Ticino, Lugano 1993 . Pp. 289. Lugano: Edizioni universitarie della Svizzera italiana, 1995. Paper, Sw. frs. 40. ISBN: 88-7795-101-0. [REVIEW]Matthew Leigh - 1998 - The Classical Review 48 (1):191-192.
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  2.  37
    G. Brugnoli, F. Stok : Pompei Exitus. Variazioni sul tema dall’antichità alla controriforma. Pp. 255. Pisa: Edizioni ETS, 1996. Paper, L. 30,000. ISBN: 88-7741-913-X. [REVIEW]Matthew Leigh - 1999 - The Classical Review 49 (2):580-581.
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  3.  6
    Sophocles at Patavium (Fr. 137 Radt).Matthew Leigh - 1998 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 118:82-100.
  4.  13
    Tacitus, Annals 1.1.1 and Aristotle.Matthew Leigh - 2013 - Classical Quarterly 63 (1):452-454.
    The first sentence of the Annals reads urbem Romam a principio reges habuere. Commentators observe the echo of Sallust, Catiline 6.1 urbem Romam, sicuti ego accepi, condidere atque habuere initio Troiani, and of Claudius, ILS 212 quondam reges hanc tenuere urbem. In a stimulating recent contribution David Levene also compares the first sentence of Justinus' Epitome of the Histories of Pompeius Trogus: principio rerum gentium nationumque imperium penes reges erat. A fourth potential model may now be taken into consideration: Ἀθηναῖοι (...)
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  5.  15
    Roman Tragedy: Theatre to Theatricality.Matthew Leigh - 2006 - American Journal of Philology 127 (1):149-152.
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  6.  12
    Ovid, Heroides 6.1–2.Matthew Leigh - 1997 - Classical Quarterly 47 (02):605-.
    It is a characteristic of Ovid's Heroides for each epistle implicitly to establish the dramatic time, context and motive for its composition by the particular heroine to whom it is attributed. In this way the poet is able to exploit the tension between the heroine's inevitably circumscribed awareness of the development of her story and the superior information which can be deployed by a reader acquainted with the mythical tradition or master-text which dictates what is actually going to follow: Penelope (...)
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  7.  11
    Forms of Exile in the Rudens of Plautus.Matthew Leigh - 2010 - Classical Quarterly 60 (1):110-.
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  8.  9
    The Garland of Maecenas (Horace, Odes 1.1.35).Matthew Leigh - 2010 - Classical Quarterly 60 (1):268-.
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  9.  8
    A Pun in Antiphanes (Fr. 225 K-A = Ath. 60C-D).Matthew Leigh - 2004 - Classical Quarterly 54 (1):278-283.
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  10.  4
    Two Notes on Ovid.Matthew Leigh - 2000 - Classical Quarterly 50 (01):311-.
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