27 found
Order:
Disambiguations
Matthew Lister [22]Matthew J. Lister [6]
See also
Profile: Matthew J. Lister (University of Pennsylvania, University of Pennsylvania)
Profile: Matthew Lister (Birkbeck College)
  1.  99
    Climate Change Refugees.Matthew Lister - 2014 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 17 (5):618-634.
    Under the UNHCR definition of a refugee, set out in the 1967 Protocol Relating to the Status of Refugees, people fleeing their homes because of natural disasters or other environmental problems do not qualify for refugee status and the protection that come from such status. In a recent paper, "Who Are Refugees?", I defended the essentials of the UNHCR definition on the grounds that refugee status and protection is best reserved for people who can only be helped by granting them (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  2. Who Are Refugees?Matthew Lister - 2013 - Law and Philosophy 32 (5):645-671.
    Hundreds of millions of people around the world are unable to meet their needs on their own, and do not receive adequate protection or support from their home states. These people, if they are to be provided for, need assistance from the international community. If we are to meet our duties to these people, we must have ways of knowing who should be eligible for different forms of relief. One prominent proposal from scholars and activists has been to classify all (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  3.  13
    The Place of Persecution and Non-State Action in Refugee Protection.Matthew Lister - 2016 - In Alex Sager (ed.), The Ethics and Politics of Immigration: Core Issues and Emerging Trends. Lanham, MD, USA: Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 45-60.
    Crises of forced migration are, unfortunately, nothing new. At the time of the writing of this paper, at least two such crises were in full swing – mass movements from the Middle East and parts of Africa to the E.U., and major movements from Central America to the Southern U.S. border, including movements by large numbers of families and unaccompanied minors. These movements are complex, with multiple causes, and it is always risky to attempt to craft either general policy or (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  32
    Justice and Temporary Labor Migration.Matthew J. Lister - 2014 - Georgetown Immigration Law Review 29:95.
    Temporary labor migration programs have been among the most controversial topics in discussions of immigration reform. They have been opposed by many, perhaps most, academics writing on immigration, by immigration reform activists, and by organized labor. This opposition has not been without some good reasons, as many historical temporary labor migration programs have led to significant injustice and abuse. However, in this paper I argue that a well-crafted temporary labor migration program is both compatible with liberal principles of justice and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Review of May & Hoskins, International Criminal Law and Philosophy. [REVIEW]Matthew Lister - 2010 - Concurring Opinions Blog.
    This is a review of an anthology on international criminal law edited by Larry May and Zack Hoskins.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  72
    Review of Carl Knight, Luck Egalitarianism. [REVIEW]Matthew Lister - 2012 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 9 (1):127-30.
  7.  33
    John Corvino and Maggie Gallagher: Debating Same-Sex Marriage.Matthew Lister - 2015 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 9 (4):727-735.
  8.  63
    Immigration, Association, and the Family.Matthew Lister - 2010 - Law and Philosophy 29 (6):717-745.
    In this paper I provide a philosophical analysis of family-based immigration. This type of immigration is of great importance, yet has received relatively little attention from philosophers and others doing normative work on immigration. As family-based immigration poses significant challenges for those seeking a comprehensive normative account of the limits of discretion that states should have in setting their own immigration policies, it is a topic that must be dealt with if we are to have a comprehensive account. In what (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  33
    Review of Corvino and Gallagher, Debating Same-Sex Marriage[REVIEW]Matthew Lister - 2015 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 9:752.
    With the recent U.S. Supreme Court cases finding the Defense of Marriage Act unconstitutional and removing impediments to same-sex marriage in California,as well as a number of recent successes in special elections and with legislators inthe U.S. and other countries, we might wonder whether there is still need for a book debating same-sex marriage. Is not the tide of history inevitably movingtowards marriage equality? While that position seems tempting, it is too quick.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  46
    There is No Human Right to Democracy. But May We Promote It Anyway?Matthew Lister - 2012 - Stanford Journal of International Law 48 (2):257.
    The idea of “promoting democracy” is one that goes in and out of favor. With the advent of the so-called “Arab Spring”, the idea of promoting democracy abroad has come up for discussion once again. Yet an important recent line of thinking about human rights, starting with John Rawls’s book The Law of Peoples, has held that there is no human right to democracy, and that nondemocratic states that respect human rights should be “beyond reproach” in the realm of international (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  44
    Review of Gerald Gaus, The Order of Public Reason. [REVIEW]Matthew Lister - 2011 - Notre Dame Philosophical Review.
  12.  40
    Review of Sovereignty’s Promise: The State as Fiduciary by Evan Fox-Decent. [REVIEW]Matthew Lister - 2012 - Ethics 123 (1):150-4.
    In Sovereignty’s Promise: The State as Fiduciary, Evan Fox-Decent uses the idea of fiduciary relationships to explain the legitimate exercise of governmental authority. He makes use of the idea of the state as a fiduciary for the people to ground an account of the duty to obey the law, to explain the proper relationships between colonial (or “settler”) societies and aboriginal populations, the role of agency discretion and judicial review in the administrative state, the rule of law, the relationship between (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  24
    Review of Defeasibility in Philosophy: Knowledge, Agency, Responsibility, and the Law; Claudia Blöser, Mikael Janvid, Hannes Ole Matthiessen, and Marcus Willaschek (Eds.). [REVIEW]Matthew Lister - 2014 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2014.
    This volume is based on papers presented at a conference on defeasibility in ethics, epistemology, law, and logic that took place at the Goethe University in Frankfurt in 2010. The subtitle (“Knowledge, Agency, Responsibility, and the Law”) better reflects the content than does the title of the original conference. None of the papers focuses directly or primarily on defeasible reasoning in logic, though a few touch on this indirectly. Nor are the papers evenly split among the topics. Six are primarily (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  41
    Four Entries for the Rawls Lexicon: Charles Beitz, H.L.A. Hart, Citizen, Sovereignty.Matthew Lister - 2015 - In Jon Mandle & David Reidy (eds.), The Cambridge Rawls Lexicon. Cambridge University Press.
    These are for entries for _The Cambridge Rawls Lexicon_, edited by Jon Mandle and David Reidy, on H.L.A. Hart, Charles Beitz, Sovereignty, and Citizen.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  35
    The Use and Abuse of Presumptions: Some Comments on Dempsey on Finnis.Matthew Lister - 2012 - Villanova Law Review 57:485.
    This paper is a short commentary on Michelle Dempsey's contribution to a symposium on the work of John Finnis which took place at Villanova Law School in the fall of 2011. It focuses on Finnis's claim that there is a presumptive obligation to obey the law and some worries that Dempsey raises against this claim. It is forthcoming, along with several other papers from the symposium, in the Villanova Law Review.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  33
    Well-Ordered Science.Matthew Lister - 2007 - Journal of Philosophical Research 32 (Supplement):127-139.
    The debate over the use of genetically-modified (GM) crops is one where the heat to light ratio is often quite low. Both proponents and opponents of GM crops often resort more to rhetoric than argument. This paper attempts to use Philip Kitcher’s idea of a “well-ordered science” to bring coherence to the debate. While I cannot, of course, here decide when and where, if at all, GM crops should be used I do show how Kitcher’s approach provides a useful framework (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  32
    The Legitimating Role of Consent in International Law.Matthew Lister - 2011 - Chicago Journal of International Law 11 (2).
    According to many traditional accounts, one important difference between international and domestic law is that international law depends on the consent of the relevant parties (states) in a way that domestic law does not. In recent years this traditional account has been attacked both by philosophers such as Allen Buchanan and by lawyers and legal scholars working on international law. It is now safe to say that the view that consent plays an important foundational role in international law is a (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  18
    Empirical Desert, Individual Prevention, and Limiting Retributivism: A Reply.Paul Robinson, Joshua S. Barton & Matthew J. Lister - 2014 - New Criminal Law Review 17 (2):312-375.
    A number of articles and empirical studies over the past decade, most by Paul Robinson and co-authors, have suggested a relationship between the extent of the criminal law's reputation for being just in its distribution of criminal liability and punishment in the eyes of the community – its "moral credibility" – and its ability to gain that community's deference and compliance through a variety of mechanisms that enhance its crime-control effectiveness. This has led to proposals to have criminal liability and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  8
    Self-Determination, Dissent, and the Problem of Population Transfers.Matthew Lister - 2016 - In Fernando R. Tesón (ed.), The Theory of Self-Determination. Cambridge University Press. pp. 145-165.
    Many of the major self-determination movements of the 20th and early 21st Centuries did not go smoothly, but resulted in forced or semi-forced transfers of groups of people from one country to another. Forced population transfers are not, of course, supported by major theorists of self-determination and secession. However, the problems that make population transfers extremely common in actual cases of self-determination and secession, are not squarely faced in many theories of self-determination. And, I shall argue, certain leading theories of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  31
    Well-Ordered Science: The Case of GM Crops.Matthew J. Lister - 2007 - Journal of Philosophical Research (Feb.):127-139.
    The proponents of competing views about the safety and usefulness of GM crops often talk past each other. One major reason for this is the lack of a shared framework in which to evaluate their competing claims. In this paper I shall make use of Philip Kitcher's idea of a well-ordered science to see if it may offer us any guidance here. In doing so I shall first lay out the idea of a well-ordered science, as developed by Kitcher. Next (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  19
    Citizenship, in the Immigration Context.Matthew Lister - 2010 - University of Maryland Law Review 70:175.
    Many international law scholars have begun to argue that the modern world is experiencing a "decline of citizenship," and that citizenship is no longer an important normative category. On the contrary, this paper argues that citizenship remains an important category and, consequently, one that implicates considerations of justice. I articulate and defend a "civic" notion of citizenship, one based explicitly on political values rather than shared demographic features like nationality, race, or culture. I use this premise to argue that a (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  26
    A Rawlsian Argument for Extending Family-Based Immigration Benefits to Same-Sex Couples.Matthew J. Lister - 2007 - University of Memphis Law Review 37 (Summer):763-764.
    In this paper I argue that anyone who accepts a Rawlsian account of justice should favor granting family-based immigration benefit to same-sex couples. I first provide a brief over-view of the most relevant aspects of Rawls's position, Justice as Fairness. I then explain why family-based immigration benefits are an important topic and one that everyone interested in immigration and justice must consider. I then show how same-sex couples are currently systematically excluded from the benefits that flow from family-based immigration rights. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  13
    Are Institutions and Empiricism Enough? [REVIEW]Matthew J. Lister - 2011 - Transnational Legal Theory 2 (1).
    Legal philosophers have given relatively little attention to international law in comparison to other topics, and philosophers working on international or global justice have not taken international law as a primary focus, either. Allen Buchanan's recent work is arguably the most important exception to these trends. For over a decade he has devoted significant time and philosophical skill to questions central to international law, and has tied these concerns to related issues of global justice more generally. In what follows I (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  19
    Gang-Related Asylum Claims: An Overview and Prescription.Matthew J. Lister - 2008 - University of Memphis Law Review 38 (4).
    Over the last several years asylum cases relating to activities of criminal gangs have greatly increased in frequency. Cases involving Central American gangs, the so-called maras, have attracted the most attention but similar cases have arisen out of South Eastern and Eastern Europe as well. Applicants in such cases face a number of difficulties as their cases do not fit into paradigm categories for asylum claims. These cases almost always involve non-state actors, for example, acting for reasons that are not, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  9
    Criminal Law Conversations: "Desert: Empirical, Not Metaphysical" and "Contractualism and the Sharing of Wrongs".Matthew Lister - 2009 - In Paul Robinson, Kimberly Ferzan & Stephen Garvey (eds.), Criminal Law Conversations.
    Following are two short contributions to the book, _Criminal Law Conversations_: commentaries on Paul Robinson's discussion of "Empirical Desert" and Antony Duff & Sandra Marshal's discussion of the sharing of wrongs.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  9
    Book Reviews Fox-Decent , Evan . Sovereignty's Promise: The State as Fiduciary Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011. Pp. 283. $99.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW]Matthew Lister - 2012 - Ethics 123 (1):150-154.
  27. Well-Ordered Science: The Case of GM Crops.Matthew Lister - 2007 - Journal of Philosophical Research 32 (Supplement):127-139.
    The debate over the use of genetically-modified crops is one where the heat to light ratio is often quite low. Both proponents and opponents of GM crops often resort more to rhetoric than argument. This paper attempts to use Philip Kitcher’s idea of a “well-ordered science” to bring coherence to the debate. While I cannot, of course, here decide when and where, if at all, GM crops should be used I do show how Kitcher’s approach provides a useful framework in (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography