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  1.  23
    Value Creation in Cross-Sector Collaborations: The Roles of Experience and Alignment.Joan Manuel Batista, Daniel Arenas & Matthew Murphy - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 130 (1):145-162.
    This research uses a survey to analyze types of benefits sought by partners in cross-sector collaborations in Spain and to test and build upon theories that indicate prior collaboration experience and partner alignment will positively affect value creation through the collaboration. Using exploratory factor analysis to operationalize a broad range of potential benefits into more specific concepts, the results of this study identify distinct factors that characterize the types of benefits sought by non-profit organizations and businesses engaged in cross-sector collaborations. (...)
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  2.  44
    Perceptions of Justice and the Human Rights Protect, Respect, and Remedy Framework.Matthew Murphy & Jordi Vives - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 116 (4):781-797.
    Human rights declarations are instruments used to introduce universal standards of ethics. The UN’s Protect, Respect, and Remedy Framework (Ruggie, Protect, respect, and remedy: A Framework for business and human rights. UN Doc A/HRC/8/5, 2008; Guiding principles on business and human rights: Implementing the United Nations “Protect, Respect, and Remedy” framework. UN Doc A/HRC/17/31, 2011) intends to provide guidance for corporate behavior in regard to human rights. This article applies concepts from the field of organizational justice to the arena of (...)
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  3.  28
    Different Paths to Collaboration Between Businesses and Civil Society and the Role of Third Parties.Daniel Arenas, Pablo Sanchez & Matthew Murphy - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 115 (4):723-739.
    In this article, we suggest that one of the unexplored paths toward collaboration between firms and civil society organizations starts with confrontation or potential conflict, and that the transition toward collaboration can be further understood if one focuses on triadic relationships rather than dyadic ones. We analyze the presence of third parties and their different roles to explain how collaboration is facilitated. The article aims at bringing together the bodies of research on business–civil society confrontation and on business–civil society collaboration. (...)
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  4.  27
    Through Indigenous Lenses: Cross—Sector Collaborations with Fringe Stakeholders. [REVIEW]Matthew Murphy & Daniel Arenas - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (1):103 - 121.
    This article argues that considering cross-sector collaborations through the lens of indigenous-corporate engagements yields a more comprehensive understanding of the range of cross-sector engagement types, emphasizes the importance of cross-cultural bridge building which has received little attention in the literature (Selsky and Parker, J Manag 31(6):849-873, 2005), and highlights the potential for innovation via collaborations with fringe stakeholders. The study offers a more overarching typology of cross-sector collaborations and, building on an ethical approach to sustainable development with indigenous peoples (Lertzman (...)
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  5.  8
    Through Indigenous Lenses: Cross-Sector Collaborations with Fringe Stakeholders.Matthew Murphy & Daniel Arenas - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (S1):103-121.
    This article argues that considering cross-sector collaborations through the lens of indigenous-corporate engagements yields a more comprehensive understanding of the range of cross-sector engagement types, emphasizes the importance of cross-cultural bridge building which has received little attention in the literature :849–873, 2005), and highlights the potential for innovation via collaborations with fringe stakeholders. The study offers a more overarching typology of cross-sector collaborations and, building on an ethical approach to sustainable development with indigenous peoples, proposes a theoretical framework for cross-cultural (...)
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