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Profile: Matthew Pianalto (Eastern Kentucky University)
  1.  14
    Happiness, Goodness, and the Best Things in Life. [REVIEW]Matthew Pianalto - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (2):209-220.
    In this article, I review some recent introductory texts on the nature of happiness and the good life.
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  2.  43
    Integrity and Struggle.Matthew Pianalto - 2012 - Philosophia 40 (2):319-336.
    Integrity is sometimes conceived in terms of the wholeness of the individual, such that persons who experience temptations or other sorts of inner conflicts, afflictions, or divisions of self would seem to lack integrity to a greater or lesser degree. I contrast this understanding of integrity—which I label psychological integrity —with a different conception which I call practical integrity . On the latter conception, persons can manifest integrity in spite of the various factors mentioned above, so long as they remain (...)
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  3.  55
    Speaking for Oneself: Wittgenstein on Ethics.Matthew Pianalto - 2011 - Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 54 (3):252 - 276.
    Abstract In the ?Lecture on ethics?, Wittgenstein declares that ethical statements are essentially nonsense. He later told Friedrich Waismann that it is essential to ?speak for oneself? on ethical matters. These comments might be taken to suggest that Wittgenstein shared an emotivist view of ethics?that one can only speak for oneself because there is no truth in ethics, only expressions of opinion (or emotions). I argue that this assimilation of Wittgenstein to emotivist thought is deeply misguided, and rests upon a (...)
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  4.  30
    Moral Courage and Facing Others.Matthew Pianalto - 2012 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 20 (2):165-184.
    Moral courage involves acting in the service of one?s convictions, in spite of the risk of retaliation or punishment. I suggest that moral courage also involves a capacity to face others as moral agents, and thus in a manner that does not objectify them. A moral stand can only be taken toward another moral agent. Often, we find ourselves unable to face others in this way, because to do so is frightening, or because we are consumed by blinding anger. But (...)
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  5.  27
    Comparing Lives: Rush Rhees on Humans and Animals.Matthew Pianalto - 2011 - Philosophical Investigations 34 (3):287-311.
    In several posthumously published writings about the differences between humans and animals, Rush Rhees criticises the view that human lives are more important than (or superior to) animal lives. Rhees' views may seem to be in sympathy with more recent critiques of “speciesism.” However, the most commonly discussed anti-speciesist moral frameworks – which take the capacity of sentience as the criterion of moral considerability – are inadequate. Rhees' remark that both humans and animals can be loved points towards a different (...)
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  6.  61
    Humility and Environmental Virtue Ethics.Matthew Pianalto - 2013 - In Michael Austin (ed.), Virtues in Action: New Essays in Applied Virtue Ethics. Palgrave-Macmillan.
  7.  29
    You Say You Want a Revolution?Matthew Pianalto - 2011 - The Philosophers' Magazine 52 (52):103-104.
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  8.  59
    Against the Intrinsic Value of Pleasure.Matthew Pianalto - 2009 - Journal of Value Inquiry 43 (1):33-39.
  9. In Defense of Patience.Matthew Pianalto - 2014 - In Dane R. Gordon & David B. Suits (eds.), Epictetus: His Continuing Influence and Contemporary Relevance. RIT Press. pp. 89-104.
     
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  10.  27
    Moral Conviction.Matthew Pianalto - 2011 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (4):381-395.
    We often praise people who stand by their convictions in the face of adversity and practice what they preach. However, strong moral convictions can also motivate atrocious acts. Two significant questions here are (1) whether conviction itself — taken as a mode of belief — has any distinctive value, or whether all the value of conviction derives from its substantive content, and (2) how conviction can be made responsible in a way that mitigates the risks of falling into dogmatism, fanaticism, (...)
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  11.  20
    Happiness, Virtue and Tyranny.Matthew Pianalto - 2008 - Philosophy Now 68:6-9.
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  12.  14
    Moral Conflict and the Indeterminacy of Morality.Matthew Pianalto - 2007 - Southwest Philosophy Review 23 (1):207-214.
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  13.  6
    Moral Realism and Ways of Life.Matthew Pianalto - 2008 - Southwest Philosophy Review 24 (1):71-78.
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  14.  6
    In Defence of Intolerance.Matthew Pianalto - 2010 - Philosophy Now 79:13-15.
  15.  3
    Geoffrey Scarre, On Courage. Reviewed By.Matthew Pianalto - 2012 - Philosophy in Review 32 (2):133-135.
  16.  1
    Nietzschean Patience.Matthew Pianalto - 2016 - Journal of Value Inquiry 50 (1):141-152.
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  17. Moral Conviction and Disagreement: Getting Beyond Negative Toleration.Matthew Pianalto - 2011 - In Danielle Poe (ed.), Communities of Peace: Confronting Injustice and Creating Justice. Rodopi.
  18. On Patience: Reclaiming a Foundational Virtue.Matthew Pianalto - 2016 - Lexington Books.
    In On Patience, Matthew Pianalto explores the multiple aspects of patience and the relationship of patience to other virtues such as courage, love, and wisdom. Drawing from a wide range of sources and traditions, Pianalto develops a picture of this foundational virtue, according to which we can never be too patient.
     
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  19. You Say You Want a Revolution? [REVIEW]Matthew Pianalto - 2011 - The Philosophers' Magazine 52:103-104.
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