23 found
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  1. Parasitism and Disjunctivism in Nyāya Epistemology.Matthew R. Dasti - 2012 - Philosophy East and West 62 (1):1-15.
    From the early modern period, Western epistemologists have often been concerned with a rigorous notion of epistemic justification, epitomized in the work of Descartes: properly held beliefs require insulation from extreme skepticism. To the degree that veridical cognitive states may be indistinguishable from non-veridical states, apparently veridical states cannot enjoy high-grade positive epistemic status. Therefore, a good believer begins from what are taken to be neutral, subjective experiences and reasons outward—hopefully identifying the kinds of appearances that properly link up to (...)
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  2.  80
    Nyāya's Self as Agent and Knower.Matthew R. Dasti - 2014 - In Matthew R. Dasti & Edwin F. Bryant (eds.), Free Will, Agency, and Selfhood in Indian Philosophy. New York: Oxford University Press USA. pp. 112.
    Much of classical Hindu thought has centered on the question of self: what is it, how does it relate to various features of the world, and how may we benefit by realizing its depths? Attempting to gain a conceptual foothold on selfhood, Hindu thinkers commonly suggest that its distinctive feature is consciousness (caitanya). Well-worn metaphors compare the self to light as its awareness illumines the world of knowable objects. Consciousness becomes a touchstone to recognize the presence of a self. A (...)
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  3. Nyāya.Matthew R. Dasti - 2012 - The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    This is an overview of the Nyaya ("Logic") school of classical Indian philosophy, focusing on the earlier period (up to roughly 1000 CE).
     
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  4.  53
    Testimony, Belief Transfer, and Causal Irrelevance: Reflections From India's Nyaya School.Matthew R. Dasti - 2008 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 25 (4):281-299.
    Recent studies of Nyäya’s account of testimony have illustrated its anticipation of contemporary testimonial antireductionism, the position that testimony cannot be reduced to a more fundamental means of knowledge like inference or perception. This paper discusses another relevant but less discussed anticipation of current debate, involving the status of speaker belief in testimonial exchange. Is a speaker’s veridical apprehension of the content of his utterance a necessary condition on testimonial exchange? This was a source of much disputation among Indian epistemologists, (...)
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  5. The Crito's Integrity.Matthew R. Dasti - 2007 - Apeiron 40 (2):123 - 140.
  6. Skepticism in Classical Indian Philosophy.Matthew R. Dasti - 2018 - In Diego E. Machuca & Baron Reed (eds.), Skepticism: From Antiquity to the Present. New York: Bloomsbury Academic.
    There are some tantalizing suggestions that Pyrrhonian skepticism has its roots in ancient India. Of them, the most important is Diogenes Laertius’s report that Pyrrho accompanied Alexander to India, where he was deeply impressed by the character of the “naked sophists” he encountered (DL IX 61). Influenced by these gymnosophists, Pyrrho is said to have adopted the practices of suspending judgment on matters of belief and cultivating an indifferent composure amid the vicissitudes of ordinary life. Such conduct, and the attitudes (...)
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  7. Nyaya's Self as Agent and Knower.Matthew R. Dasti - 2014 - In Matthew R. Dasti & Edwin F. Bryant (eds.), Free Will, Agency, and Selfhood in Indian Philosophy. New York: Oxford University Press USA.
     
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  8.  61
    Vatsyayana: Cognition as a Guide to Action.Matthew R. Dasti - 2014 - In Jonardon Ganeri (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Indian Philosophy. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
    Pakṣilasvāmin Vātsyāyana (c. 450 CE) is the author of the Commentary on Nyāya (Nyāya-bhāṣya), the first full commentary on the Nyāya-sūtra of Gautama (c. 150 CE), which is itself the foundational text of the school of philosophy called “Nyāya.” The Nyāya tradition is home to a number of leading voices within the classical Indian philosophical scene and is celebrated in later doxographies as one of the six “orthodox” systems of Hindu thought. Given the way that sūtra texts and their first (...)
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  9.  28
    The Vindication of the World: Essays Engaging with Stephen Phillips.Malcolm Keating & Matthew R. Dasti (eds.) - forthcoming - New York: Routledge.
    Stephen Phillips has devoted his career to excavating some of the most valuable gems of Indian philosophy and bringing them into conversation with contemporary thought. This volume honors him and follows his lead by continuing his lifelong project: faithfully interpreting Sanskrit texts to think along with their authors about ideas that still perplex us today. -/- It features ten new essays focusing on epistemology, logic, and metaphysics from outstanding philosophers and scholars of Sanskrit philosophy, with contributions varying in methodology: both (...)
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  10. Theism in Asian Philosophy.Matthew R. Dasti - 2012 - In Charles Taliaferro, Victoria S. Harrison & Stewart Goetz (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Theism. Routledge.
    This paper examines of the intersection of theism and philosophy in classical Indian thought, focusing on the rational theology of Nyaya and the revealed theology of Vedanta. I also consider anti-theistic arguments, primarily by classical Buddhists.
     
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  11.  98
    Indian Rational Theology: Proof, Justification, and Epistemic Liberality in Nyāya's Argument for God.Matthew R. Dasti - 2011 - Asian Philosophy 21 (1):1-21.
    In classical India, debates over rational theology naturally become the occasion for fundamental questions about the scope and power of inference itself. This is well evinced in the classical proofs for God by the Hindu Nyāya tradition and the opposing arguments of classical Buddhists and Mīmāsā philosophers. This paper calls attention to, and provides analysis of, a number of key nodes in these debates, particularly questions of inferential boundaries and whether inductive reasoning has the power to support inferences to wholly (...)
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  12.  65
    The Six Systems.Matthew R. Dasti - 2013 - Oxford Bibliographies Online.
    This is a select annotated bibliography of literature on the famous Six Systems of orthodox Hindu philosophy.
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  13.  41
    Vatsyayana's Commentary on the Nyaya-sutra.Matthew R. Dasti - 2023 - New York, US: Oxford University Press.
    Vatsyayana's Commentary on the Nyaya-sutra is one of classical India's most important philosophical works.
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  14.  37
    God and the World's Arrangement: Readings from Vedanta and Nyaya Philosophy of Religion.Nirmalya Guha, Matthew R. Dasti & Stephen H. Phillips (eds.) - 2021 - Cambridge: Hackett Publishing Company.
    The work of three present-day Sankritist-philosophers, _God and the World's Arrangement_ allows readers to engage directly with writings of the classical Indian philosophers Śaṅkara and Vācaspati, as well as some of their most acute critics, on the question of whether the existence of a creator God can be known by reason alone. Carefully selected and annotated with the needs of students foremost in mind, these new translations will be of interest to anyone wishing to see up close a newly set (...)
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  15.  64
    Systematizing Nyāya. [REVIEW]Matthew R. Dasti - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (4):617-637.
    An ongoing effort, exemplified though happily not exhausted in the work of B. K. Matilal, is to present the best of classical Indian philosophy in a way that speaks to contemporary philosophical concerns, while still being historically and philologically responsible. Epistemology in Classical India: The Knowledge Sources of the Nyāya School by Stephen Phillips is expressly this kind of work. Phillips begins by explaining that his book is “for philosophers and students of philosophy, not for specialists in classical Indian thought” (...)
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  16. Against a Hindu God by Parimal G. Patil (Columbia University Press 2009). [REVIEW]Matthew R. Dasti - 2010 - Journal of Asian Studies.
     
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  17.  55
    Divine Self, Human Self by Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad (Bloomsbury 2013). [REVIEW]Matthew R. Dasti - 2013 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2013 (1):1.
    Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad's delightful and challenging little book does not fit easily into the standard categories available for academic excursions into philosophy. It is, to simplify, a venture in constructive philosophical theology, centered on questions of being and selfhood, which takes the form of a reflection upon the Bhagavad-gītā commentaries written by two of India's leading philosopher/theologians, Śaṅkara (c. 8th century CE) and Rāmānuja (c. 11th century CE). While Ram-Prasad does try to argue for the best readings of Śaṅkara and Rāmānuja, (...)
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  18.  42
    Indian Buddhist Philosophy, by Amber Carpenter. [REVIEW]Matthew R. Dasti - 2015 - Mind 124 (496):1254-1258.
    For those of us who work in Indian philosophy, these are encouraging times, with reasons for guarded optimism that the broader philosophical community will slowly continue to realize the quality and depth of Indian responses to perennial philosophical problems. Across the profession, there is increased awareness of the sheer historical contingency behind the political, social, and distinctively academic structures which perpetuate the myopic idea that Philosophy proper is a cultural practice tied to a fairly narrow tradition that began with Thales (...)
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  19.  34
    When Knowledge Meets Devotion, by Ravi Gupta (Routledge 2007). [REVIEW]Matthew R. Dasti - 2009 - Sophia 48 (3):335-337.
  20.  29
    Meets Devotion: Abingdon and New York: Routledge, 2007, ISBN: 978-0-415-40548-5, 225 pp. [REVIEW]Matthew R. Dasti - 2009 - Sophia 48 (3):335-337.
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  21. An Introduction to Indian Philosophy by Bina Gupta (Routledge 2012). [REVIEW]Matthew R. Dasti - 2012 - Religious Studies Review 38 (3):190.
     
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  22.  43
    Review of the book: Indian Buddhist Philosophy by Amber Carpenter. [REVIEW]Matthew R. Dasti - unknown
    Review of the book Indian Buddhist Philosophy, by Amber Carpenter. Durham: Acumen Publishing, 2014.
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  23. The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali by Edwin Bryant (North Point Press 2009). [REVIEW]Matthew R. Dasti - 2010 - Journal of Vaishnava Studies.
     
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