Results for 'Matthew S. Harding'

1000+ found
Order:
See also
Matthew Ian Harding
University of Edinburgh (PhD)
  1. Atonement Theory Revisited: Calvin, Beza, and Amyraut on the Extent of the Atonement.Matthew S. Harding - 2013 - Perichoresis 11 (1):51-75.
    Throughout the bulk of the Reformed Tradition’s history within both Europe and the United States, most scholars have dismissed pastor and theologian Moïse Amyraut as a seventeenth century French heretic whose actions and theology led to the demise of the Huguenots in France. However, upon further introspection into Amyraut’s claims as being closer to Calvin (soteriologically) than his Genevan successors, one finds uncanny parallels in the scriptural commentaries and biblical insight into the expiation of Christ between Calvin and Amyraut. By (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  77
    Naturalism and normative cognition.Matthew S. Bedke - 2021 - Philosophical Studies 178 (1):147-167.
    Normative cognition seems rather important, even ineliminable. Communities that lack normative concepts like SHOULD, IS A REASON TO, JUSTIFIES, etc. seem cognitively handicapped and communicatively muzzled. And yet a popular metaethic, normative naturalism, has a hard time accommodating this felt ineliminability. Here, I press the argument against normative naturalism, consider some replies on behalf of normative naturalists, and suggest that a version of sophisticated subjectivism does the best job preserving the importance and ineliminability of the special, normative way of thinking.
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3.  47
    The Theory of Planned Behavior as a Model of Academic Dishonesty in Engineering and Humanities Undergraduates.Trevor S. Harding, Matthew J. Mayhew, Cynthia J. Finelli & Donald D. Carpenter - 2007 - Ethics and Behavior 17 (3):255 – 279.
    This study examines the use of a modified form of the theory of planned behavior in understanding the decisions of undergraduate students in engineering and humanities to engage in cheating. We surveyed 527 randomly selected students from three academic institutions. Results supported the use of the model in predicting ethical decision-making regarding cheating. In particular, the model demonstrated how certain variables (gender, discipline, high school cheating, education level, international student status, participation in Greek organizations or other clubs) and moral constructs (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  4. Kant's Conception of the Highest Good, the Gesinnung, and the Theory of Radical Evil.Matthew Caswell - 2006 - Kant-Studien 97 (2):184-209.
    Early in the Preface to Religion within the Limits of Reason Alone, Kant claims that “morality leads ineluctably to religion”. This thesis is hardly an innovation of the Religion. Again and again throughout the critical corpus, Kant argues that religious belief is ethically significant, that it makes a morally meaningful difference whether an agent believes or disbelieves. And yet these claims are surely among the most doubted of Kant's positions – and they are often especially doubted by readers who consider (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  5. Consistency is Hardly Ever Enough: Reflections on Hillel Steiner's Methodology.Matthew H. Kramer - 2009 - In Stephen De Wijze, Matthew H. Kramer & Ian Carter (eds.), Hillel Steiner and the Anatomy of Justice: Themes and Challenges. Routledge.
  6.  63
    Mereological Considerations In Vasubandhu’s “Proof of Idealism”.Matthew Kapstein - 1988 - Idealistic Studies 18 (1):32-54.
    And the venerable Nāgasena said to Milinda the king: “You, Sire, have been brought up in great luxury, as beseems your noble birth. If you were to walk this dry weather on the hot and sandy ground, trampling under foot the gritty, gravelly grains of the hard sand, your feet would hurt you. And as your body would be in pain, your mind would be disturbed, and you would experience a sense of bodily suffering. How then did you come, on (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  7.  56
    Mereological Considerations In Vasubandhu’s “Proof of Idealism”.Matthew Kapstein - 1988 - Idealistic Studies 18:32.
    And the venerable Nāgasena said to Milinda the king: “You, Sire, have been brought up in great luxury, as beseems your noble birth. If you were to walk this dry weather on the hot and sandy ground, trampling under foot the gritty, gravelly grains of the hard sand, your feet would hurt you. And as your body would be in pain, your mind would be disturbed, and you would experience a sense of bodily suffering. How then did you come, on (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  8.  62
    Thomas Aquinas on Anselm’s Argument.Matthew R. Cosgrove - 1974 - Review of Metaphysics 27 (3):513 - 530.
    Of these discussions the last, from the Summa Theologiae, is the best known and is often taken as representative of Thomas’ response to Anselm. Yet it would seem, on the face of it, unsatisfying as a refutation. Gareth Matthews’ comment expresses a very widely shared reaction: "Instead of showing that Anselm’s argument is invalid, Aquinas seems content to state, without counterargument, that the alleged conclusion does not follow." To many, Thomas’ critique represents no advance beyond Gaunilo in understanding Anselm, but (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  9.  2
    A Calvinist and Anabaptist Understanding of the Ban.Matthew Scott Harding - 2012 - Perichoresis 10 (2):165-193.
    A Calvinist and Anabaptist Understanding of the BanAmidst a growing renewal of interest in Calvinism and Calvin scholarship throughout the globe in the wake of John Calvin’s 500th anniversary of his birth, this article focuses on John Calvin’s early ecclesiological development. In contrast to advancing theories that Calvin developed his ecclesiological understanding of church discipline from earlier Anabaptist doctrines and leaders which he would have been exposed to intimately during his exile in Strasbourg, this article argues that Calvin had already (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Charity Law and the Liberal State.Matthew Harding - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    Charity Law and the Liberal State considers questions relating to state action and public discourse that are raised by the law of charity. Informed by liberal philosophical commitments and of interest to both charity lawyers and political philosophers, it addresses themes and topics such as: the justifiability of the state's non-neutral promotion of charitable purposes; the role of altruism in charity law; charity law, the tax system and the demands of distributive justice; the proper treatment of religious and political purposes (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  1
    Keeping Justice (Largely) Out of Charity: Pluralism and the Division of Labor Between Charitable Organizations and the State.Daniel Halliday & Matthew Harding - 2020 - Legal Theory 26 (4):281-304.
    Justice can be pursued by the state, or through voluntary charity. This paper seeks to contribute to the debate about the appropriate division of labor between government and charitable agencies by developing a positive account of the charity sector's moral foundations. The account given here is grounded in a legal conception of charity, as a set of subsidies and privileges designed to cultivate a wide variety of activities aimed at enhancing civic virtue and autonomy. Among other things, this implies that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. The Phenomenology of Depression and the Nature of Empathy.Matthew Ratcliffe - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (2):269-280.
    This paper seeks to illuminate the nature of empathy by reflecting upon the phenomenology of depression. I propose that depression involves alteration of an aspect of experience that is seldom reflected upon or discussed, thus making it hard to understand. This alteration involves impairment or loss of a capacity for interpersonal relatedness that mutual empathy depends upon. The sufferer thus feels cut off from other people, and may remark on their indifference, hostility or inability to understand. Drawing upon the example (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  13.  84
    Memory, Epistemology Of.Matthew Frise - 2015 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    We learn a lot. Friends tell us about their lives. Books tell us about the past. We see the world. We reason and we reflect on our mental lives. As a result we come to know and to form justified beliefs about a range of topics. We also seem to keep these beliefs. How? The natural answer is: by memory. It is not too hard to understand that memory allows us to retain information. It is harder to understand exactly how (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  14.  22
    Nietzsche's Naturalized Aestheticism.Matthew Meyer - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (1):138-160.
    This essay seeks to overcome the divide that has emerged in recent scholarship between Alexander Nehamas’s reading of Nietzsche as an aestheticist who eschews the dogmatism implicit in the scientific project and Brian Leiter's reading of Nietzsche as a hard-nosed naturalist whose project is continuous with the natural sciences. It is argued that Nietzsche turns to the natural sciences to justify a relationalist ontology that not only eliminates metaphysical concepts such as ‘being’ and ‘things-in-themselves’, but also can be linked to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  57
    The Place of Persecution and Non-State Action in Refugee Protection.Matthew Lister - 2016 - In Alex Sager (ed.), The Ethics and Politics of Immigration: Core Issues and Emerging Trends. Lanham, MD, USA: Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 45-60.
    Crises of forced migration are, unfortunately, nothing new. At the time of the writing of this paper, at least two such crises were in full swing – mass movements from the Middle East and parts of Africa to the E.U., and major movements from Central America to the Southern U.S. border, including movements by large numbers of families and unaccompanied minors. These movements are complex, with multiple causes, and it is always risky to attempt to craft either general policy or (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  16.  13
    Gödel Diffeomorphisms.Matthew Foreman - 2020 - Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 26 (3-4):219-223.
    In 1932, von Neumann proposed classifying the statistical behavior of differentiable systems. Joint work of B. Weiss and the author proved that the classification problem is complete analytic. Based on techniques in that proof, one is able to show that the collection of recursive diffeomorphisms of the 2-torus that are isomorphic to their inverses is $\Pi ^0_1$-hard via a computable 1-1 reduction. As a corollary there is a diffeomorphism that is isomorphic to its inverse if and only if the Riemann (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17. Melancholia: The Western Malady.Matthew Bell - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    Melancholia is a commonly experienced feeling, and one with a long and fascinating medical history which can be charted back to antiquity. Avoiding the simplistic binary opposition of constructivism and hard realism, this book argues that melancholia was a culture-bound syndrome which thrived in the West because of the structure of Western medicine since the Ancient Greeks, and because of the West's fascination with self-consciousness. While melancholia cannot be equated with modern depression, Matthew Bell argues that concepts from recent (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18.  54
    Cohen on ‘Epistemic’.Matthew McGrath - 2016 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 59 (7-8):889-905.
    Stewart Cohen offers a critique of much contemporary epistemology. Epistemologies use the term ‘epistemic’ in order to specify the issues they investigate and about which they disagree. Cohen sees widespread confusion about these issues. The problem, he argues, is that ‘epistemic’ is functioning as an inadequately defined technical term. I will argue, rather, that the troubles come more from non-technical vocabulary, in particular with ‘justification’ and ‘ought’, and generally from the difficulty of explaining normativity. Overall, the message of this paper (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  19. Sessions with Pixie in P.S. 87: A Classroom Log.Matthew Lipman - 1982 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 3 (1).
    Early in 1982 I decided I needed to get some firsthand experience in the teaching of Pixie. Pixie had been published the previous year and was already in use in a number of school districts. Since I wasn't getting much feedback from the teachers, I decided to offer an abbreviated course in Pixie to some fourth graders. The school I selected was P.S. 87, in Manhattan. The principal, Naomi Hill, was hospitable to the idea, and the classroom teacher, Gloria Goldberg, (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  34
    Content, Consciousness, and Cambridge Change.Matthew Rellihan - 2015 - Acta Analytica 30 (4):325-345.
    Representationalism is widely thought to grease the skids of ontological reduction. If phenomenal character is just a certain sort of intentional content, representationalists argue, the hard problem of accommodating consciousness within a broadly naturalistic view of the world reduces to the much easier problem of accommodating intentionality. I argue, however, that there’s a fatal flaw in this reasoning, for if phenomenal character really is just a certain sort of intentional content, it’s not anything like the sort of intentional content described (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21.  15
    The Total Archive: Data, Subjectivity, Universality.Boris Jardine & Matthew Drage - 2018 - History of the Human Sciences 31 (5):3-22.
    The complete system of knowledge is a standard trope of science fiction, a techno-utopian dream and an aesthetic ideal. It is Solomon’s House, the Encyclopaedia and the Museum. It is also an ideology – of Enlightenment, High Modernism and absolute governance. Far from ending the dream of a total archive, 20th-century positivist rationality brought it ever closer. From Paul Otlet’s ‘Mundaneum’ to Mass-Observation, from the Unity of Science movement to Wikipedia, the dream of universal knowledge dies hard. As a political (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  22.  6
    Drafted Into a Foreign War?: On the Very Idea of Ancient Philosophy as a Way of Life.Matthew Sharpe - 2021 - Rhizomata 8 (2):183-217.
    This paper examines the central criticisms that come, broadly, from the modern, ‘analytic’ tradition, of Pierre Hadot’s idea of ancient philosophy as a way of life.: Firstly, ancient philosophy just did not or could not have involved anything like the ‘spiritual practices’ or ‘technologies of the self’, aiming at curing subjects’ unnecessary desires or bettering their lives, contra Hadot and Foucault et al. Secondly, any such metaphilosophical account of putative ‘philosophy’ must unacceptably downplay the role of ‘serious philosophical reasoning’ or (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  11
    Introduction: Framing the Problems of Time and Identity.Matthew Slater - 2010 - In Joseph Keim Campbell, Michael O.'Rourke & Harry Silverstein (eds.), Time and Identity. MIT Press.
    The hard questions regarding identity, explicitly or implicitly, involve questions of time, therefore inheriting the complexities involved in the discussion of the concept of time. This book begins the discussion of the philosophy of time by posing the question of whether time exists or not. In ancient times, the reality of time was presupposed even if the concept did not have a clear-cut definition. Ironically, it was during the time when physicists seemed to gain a better scientific understanding of time (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  79
    Stanford’s Unconceived Alternatives From the Perspective of Epistemic Obligations.Matthew S. Sample - 2015 - Philosophy of Science 82 (5):856-866.
    Kyle Stanford’s reformulation of the problem of underdetermination has the potential to highlight the epistemic obligations of scientists. Stanford, however, presents the phenomenon of unconceived alternatives as a problem for realists, despite critics’ insistence that we have contextual explanations for scientists’ failure to conceive of their successors’ theories. I propose that responsibilist epistemology and the concept of “role oughts,” as discussed by Lorraine Code and Richard Feldman, can pacify Stanford’s critics and reveal broader relevance of the “new induction.” The possibility (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  25.  85
    Pragmatic Faith in Science and Religion: A Response to New Atheism.Matthew Crippen - forthcoming - Quadranti Magazine.
    It is a cliché to say science and religion are antagonistic. The outlook is often promoted by religious people uneducated in the workings of science, and equally by scientifically-oriented individuals with little experience of religion. This essay challenges presumptions about the irreconcilability of science and religion, focusing on action organizing metaphysical principles infusing both. The aim, however, is not to evaluate proofs for God’s existence, nor defend young earth creationism, nor the notion that there is one true religion, nor still (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  12
    Solving for the Triad: Xunzi and Wendell Berry on Sustainable Agriculture as Ethical Practice.Matthew Duperon - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (2):380-398.
    The classical Confucian thinker Xunzi is often characterized as a hard-nosed realist, and stands out in the early Chinese canon for his uncompromising materialist cosmology. Xunzi sees the actions of Heaven in terms of natural material forces rather than supernatural theistic ones, and this view leads him to reject various forms of supernaturalism. Xunzi's cosmological concept of the Triad formed by Heaven, Earth, and Humans also places humans at the center of the cosmos, and as such makes his stance very (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  24
    Speculum Animae: Richard Rufus on Perception and Cognition.Matthew Etchemendy & Rega Wood - 2011 - Franciscan Studies 69:53-115.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:“Garrulus sum et loquax et expedire nescio. Diu te tenui in istis, sed de cetero procedam.” These are the words of Richard Rufus of Cornwall, a thirteenth-century Scholastic and lecturer at the Universities of Paris and Oxford. Rufus is apologizing to his readers: “I am garrulous and loquacious, and I don’t know how to be efficient. I have detained you with these things a long while, but let me (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Echoes of Past and Present.Matthew Crippen & Matthew Dixon - 2019 - In Randall E. Auxier & Megan Volpert (eds.), Tom Petty and Philosophy. Chicago, IL, USA: Open Court Publishing. pp. 16-25.
    The album Echo was produced in a depressed, drug-riddled phase when Tom Petty’s first marriage was ending and his physical condition so degraded that he took to using a cane. Petty filmed no videos, avoided playing the album’s songs on the follow-up tour and reported little memory of its making. The thoughtfulness and self-reflection that traumatic circumstances spur distinguish the album. So too does the tendency to look backwards in times of crisis, whether in hopes of finding solidity in the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. No Coincidence?Matthew S. Bedke - 2014 - Oxford Studies in Metaethics 9:102-125.
    This paper critically examines coincidence arguments and evolutionary debunking arguments against non-naturalist realism in metaethics. It advances a version of these arguments that goes roughly like this: Given a non-naturalist, realist metaethic, it would be cosmically coincidental if our first order normative beliefs were true. This coincidence undermines any prima facie justification enjoyed by those beliefs.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  30. Against Normative Naturalism.Matthew S. Bedke - 2012 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 90 (1):111 - 129.
    This paper considers normative naturalism, understood as the view that (i) normative sentences are descriptive of the way things are, and (ii) their truth/falsity does not require ontology beyond the ontology of the natural world. Assuming (i) for the sake of argument, I here show that (ii) is false not only as applied to ethics, but more generally as applied to practical and epistemic normativity across the board. The argument is a descendant of Moore's Open Question Argument and Hume's Is-Ought (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  31. A Dilemma for Non-Naturalists: Irrationality or Immorality?Matthew S. Bedke - 2020 - Philosophical Studies 177 (4):1027-1042.
    Either 1. the non-naturalist is in a state of mind that would treat as relevant information about the existence and patterns of non-natural properties and facts as they make up their mind about normative matters, or 2. the non-naturalist is in a state of mind that would treat as irrelevant information about the existence and patterns of non-natural properties and facts as they make up their mind about normative matters. The first state of mind is morally objectionable, for one should (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  32. Intuitive Non-Naturalism Meets Cosmic Coincidence.Matthew S. Bedke - 2009 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 90 (2):188-209.
    Having no recourse to ways of knowing about the natural world, ethical non-naturalists are in need of an epistemology that might apply to a normative breed of facts or properties, and intuitionism seems well suited to fill that bill. Here I argue that the metaphysical inspiration for ethical intuitionism undermines that very epistemology, for this pair of views generates what I call the defeater from cosmic coincidence. Unfortunately, we face not a happy union, but a difficult choice: either ethical intuitionism (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   43 citations  
  33. Might All Normativity Be Queer?Matthew S. Bedke - 2010 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (1):41-58.
    Here I discuss the conceptual structure and core semantic commitments of reason-involving thought and discourse needed to underwrite the claim that ethical normativity is not uniquely queer. This deflates a primary source of ethical scepticism and it vindicates so-called partner in crime arguments. When it comes to queerness objections, all reason-implicating normative claims?including those concerning Humean reasons to pursue one's ends, and epistemic reasons to form true beliefs?stand or fall together.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  34. The Iffiest Oughts: A Guise of Reasons Account of End‐Given Conditionals.Matthew S. Bedke - 2009 - Ethics 119 (4):672-698.
    It often seems that what one ought to do depends on what contingent ends one has adopted and the means to pursuing them. Imagine, for example, that you are applying for jobs, and a particularly attractive one comes your way. It offers excellent colleagues in a desirable location, the pay is good, and acquiring a job like this is one of your ends. If practicing your job talk is a means to getting the job, the following seems true: (1) If (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  35. Ethical Intuitions: What They Are, What They Are Not, and How They Justify.Matthew S. Bedke - 2008 - American Philosophical Quarterly 45 (3):253-270.
    There are ways that ethical intuitions might be, and the various possibilities have epistemic ramifications. This paper criticizes some extant accounts of what ethical intuitions are and how they justify, and it offers an alternative account. Roughly, an ethical intuition that p is a kind of seeming state constituted by a consideration whether p, attended by positive phenomenological qualities that count as evidence for p, and so a reason to believe that p. They are distinguished from other kinds of seemings, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  36. Between Deflationism and the Correspondence Theory.Matthew McGrath - 1998 - Dissertation, Brown University
    I offer an account of truth that combines elements of deflationism and traditional correspondence theories. We need such an intermediary account, I argue, in order to adequately answer two kinds of questions: "Why do we find it obvious that 'p' is true iff p?" and "Why is it contingent that 'p' is true iff p?" If what it is for 'p' to be true is explained by simply saying that p, as the deflationist claims, it is hard to see how (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  6
    Vattimo and Ecclesiology.Matthew Edward Harris - forthcoming - Heythrop Journal.
    Gianni Vattimo is a postmodern philosopher working within the field of hermeneutics. For someone who is not a theologian first and foremost and who only views himself as a ‘half-believer’, it is perhaps hard to see what he could possibly have to contribute to a debate on ecclesiology, a theoretical study of the Church. Nevertheless, his relatively recent writings which constitute his ‘return to religion’ offer a surprising amount of interesting and relevant material on this topic. On one level, coming (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Rationalist Restrictions and External Reasons.Matthew S. Bedke - 2010 - Philosophical Studies 151 (1):39 - 57.
    Historically, the most persuasive argument against external reasons proceeds through a rationalist restriction: For all agents A, and all actions Φ, there is a reason for A to Φ only if Φing is rationally accessible from A's actual motivational states. Here I distinguish conceptions of rationality, show which one the internalist must rely on to argue against external reasons, and argue that a rationalist restriction that features that conception of rationality is extremely implausible. Other conceptions of rationality can render the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  39.  5
    Slurs and Tone.Ernie Lepore & Matthew Stone - 2018 - In Annalisa Coliva, Paolo Leonardi & Sebastiano Moruzzi (eds.), Eva Picardi on Language, Analysis and History. Cham: Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 205-217.
    Two claims that are hard to deny are that slurs can be offensive, and that not all uses of language are communicative. It’s therefore perplexing why no one has considered the possibility that slurs might be offensive not because of what they communicate but rather because of interpretive effects their uses might exact. In what follows, we intend to argue just that, namely, that confrontations with slurs can set in motion a kind of imaginative engagement that rouses objectionable psychological states. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  19
    Irrationality and Self-Deception Within Kant’s Grades of Evil.Matthew S. Rukgaber - 2015 - Kant-Studien 106 (2):234-258.
    Scholars have failed to adequately distinguish Kant’s grades of evil: frailty (weakness of will), impurity, and depravity. I argue that the only way to distinguish them is, f irstly, to recognize that frailty is explicitly, practically irrational and not caused by any sort of self-deception. Instead, it is caused by the radical evil that Kant finds within the character of all persons. Secondly, impurity can only be understood to be self-deception either about the nature of the act itself, which results (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41.  21
    Formulating an Anarchist Sociology: Peter Kropotkin’s Reading of Herbert Spencer.Matthew S. Adams - 2016 - Journal of the History of Ideas 77 (1):49-73.
  42. Intuitional Epistemology in Ethics.Matthew S. Bedke - 1069-1083 - Philosophy Compass 5 (12):1069-1083.
    Here I examine the major theories of ethical intuitions, focusing on the epistemic status of this class of intuitions. We cover self-evidence theory, seeming-state theory, and some of the recent contributions from experimental philosophy.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  43.  14
    The Implications of Genetic and Other Biological Explanations for Thinking About Mental Disorders.Matthew S. Lebowitz - 2019 - Hastings Center Report 49 (S1):S82-S87.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  44. Practical Reasons, Practical Rationality, Practical Wisdom.Matthew S. Bedke - 2008 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (1):85-111.
    There are a number of proposals as to exactly how reasons, ends and rationality are related. It is often thought that practical reasons can be analyzed in terms of practical rationality, which, in turn, has something to do with the pursuit of ends. I want to argue against the conceptual priority of rationality and the pursuit of ends, and in favor of the conceptual priority of reasons. This case comes in two parts. I first argue for a new conception of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  45. “The Key to Transcendental Philosophy”: Space, Time and the Body in Kant.Matthew S. Rukgaber - 2009 - Kant-Studien 100 (2):166-186.
    The thesis of this essay is that Kant's theory of the “forms of intuition” can be regarded as an account of the structure of our embodied perspective. The ideality and subjectivity of space is concluded to be an account of the perspective relative nature of the figure-ground relationship or how it is that objects emerge for us in empirical experience as being orientated in a spatio-temporal field. Time is regarded similarly as the event-series relationship. The significant role of embodiment in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  46. Developmental Process Reliabilism: On Justification, Defeat, and Evidence.Matthew S. Bedke - 2010 - Erkenntnis 73 (1):1 - 17.
    Here I present and defend an etiological theory of objective, doxastic justification, and related theories of defeat and evidence. The theory is intended to solve a problem for reliabilist epistemologies— the problem of identifying relevant environments for assessing a process's reliability. It is also intended to go some way to accommodating, neutralizing, or explaining away many internalist-friendly elements in our epistemic thinking.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  47. S Thoughts on Music Web Page.Tyler Cowen - unknown
    In classical music, the immediate canon is Bach, Beethoven, Brahms, and Mozart. With Bach and Beethoven it is hard to go wrong. But my short list there would be Bach's B Minor Mass and St. Matthew's Passion, The Art of the Fugue, Well-Tempered Klavier, some of the organ music, the Brandenburgs, the Partitas, the Goldberg Variations, and the solo violin works.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  11
    Ethical Advocacy Across the Autism Spectrum: Beyond Partial Representation.Matthew S. McCoy, Emily Y. Liu, Amy S. F. Lutz & Dominic Sisti - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (4):13-24.
    Recent debates within the autism advocacy community have raised difficult questions about who can credibly act as a representative of a particular population and what responsibilities that...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  49.  37
    Deleuze’s Difference.Matthew S. Linck - 2008 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 16 (4):509 – 532.
    This article delineates the core concerns and motivations of the ontological work of Gilles Deleuze, and is intended as a programmatic statement for a general philosophical audience. The article consists of two main parts. In the first, two early writings by Deleuze are analysed in order to clarify his understanding of ontology broadly, and to specify the precise aim of his understanding of being in terms of difference. The second part of the article looks at the work of Heidegger and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  50.  35
    Preserving Employee Dignity During the Termination Interview: An Empirical Examination.Matthew S. Wood & Steven J. Karau - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 86 (4):519-534.
    Despite the ongoing need for managers to fire employees and the wide prevalence of downsizing and layoffs, little research has examined how the conduct of termination interviews affects employee reactions. The current research was designed to explore reactions to several commonly used termination interview practices. Two scenario-based experiments examined the effectiveness of having a third party (an HR manager or a security guard) present, mentioning the employee's positive characteristics and contributions, and using alone, discrete escort, or public escort modes of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000