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  1.  36
    Deleuze’s Difference.Matthew S. Linck - 2008 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 16 (4):509 – 532.
    This article delineates the core concerns and motivations of the ontological work of Gilles Deleuze, and is intended as a programmatic statement for a general philosophical audience. The article consists of two main parts. In the first, two early writings by Deleuze are analysed in order to clarify his understanding of ontology broadly, and to specify the precise aim of his understanding of being in terms of difference. The second part of the article looks at the work of Heidegger and (...)
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  2.  45
    Unmastering Speech: Irony in Plato's Phaedrus.Matthew S. Linck - 2003 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 36 (3):264-276.
  3.  51
    The Harmony of Plato and Aristotle.Matthew S. Linck - 2006 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 13 (2):38-44.
    The pervasive tendency to characterize Plato and Aristotle as philosophers who are fundamentally in opposition blocks an adequate contemporary reception of their writings. This tendency results in superficial presentations of the philosophical concerns of both thinkers and obscures the historical affinity between their global projects. This article provides an example of a reading that respects the accord between Plato and Aristotle on one crucial issue: the foundation of a good life. With respect to Plato’s Republic, I demonstrate that the harmonization (...)
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  4.  15
    Double Vision.Matthew S. Linck - 2008 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (1):25-47.
    This article argues that the distinction between the sensible and the intelligible in Plato’s dialogues is not a dogmaticassertion or the foundation for a set of doctrines, but is rather the very starting point of philosophical activity. This starting point will be shown to be, in its most fundamental aspect, not something chosen by the philosopher, but rather the attribute that makes the philosopher who he is. Much of my argument will turn on a consideration of the divided line. In (...)
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  5.  6
    Double Vision: On the Sensible and the Intelligible.Matthew S. Linck - 2008 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (1):25-47.
    This article argues that the distinction between the sensible and the intelligible in Plato’s dialogues is not a dogmaticassertion or the foundation for a set of doctrines, but is rather the very starting point of philosophical activity. This starting point will be shown to be, in its most fundamental aspect, not something chosen by the philosopher, but rather the attribute that makes the philosopher who he is. Much of my argument will turn on a consideration of the divided line. In (...)
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  6.  18
    Unmastering Speech: Irony in Plato's.Matthew S. Linck - unknown
  7. Ronald Beiner and Jennifer Nedelsky, Eds., Judgment, Imagination, and Politics: Themes From Kant and Arendt Reviewed By.Matthew S. Linck - 2002 - Philosophy in Review 22 (4):246-248.
  8. Coming to the Ideas: A Study of Ideality in Plato's "Phaedo", "Parmenides", and "Symposium".Matthew S. Linck - 2004 - Dissertation, New School University
    This study begins from the relationship among three sets of passages from Plato's dialogues. The Phaedo, Symposium, and Parmenides are unique in being the only narrated dialogues that are not narrated by Socrates. Additionally, only these dialogue contain accounts of the young Socrates. Finally, each of these accounts are centrally concerned with aspects of ideality. On the basis of these connections, the study is set up as a close reading of these passages specifically with respect to the eidetic in relation (...)
     
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