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  1.  15
    John Macmurray and the Politics of Rationality in Interwar Britain.Matthew Sterenberg - 2019 - History of European Ideas 45 (5):737-753.
    ABSTRACTThis article proposes a new approach to understanding the interwar work of the philosopher John Macmurray. Because Macmurray stood outside the main currents of twentieth-century British philosophy and cultural critique, scholars have sometimes struggled – as did many of his contemporaries – to assess his significance as a thinker. This article suggests that we can understand much of Macmurray’s work as a sustained exercise in the ‘politics of rationality’. That is, he was attempting to shift public understanding of the nature (...)
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  2.  45
    Null.Greg Andonian, Natasa Bakic-Miric, Giorgio Baruchello, John Bokina, Silvia Bruti, Edmund J. Campion, Mihai Caprioara, Victor Castellani, Anthony H. Chambers, Camelia Mihaela Cmeciu, Doina Cmeciu, Stanley Corngold, Douglas J. Cremer, Jens De Vleminck, Liviu Drugus, Eberhard Eichenhofer, Dario Fernandez-Morera, Richard Findler, Irene Guenther, Jeff Horn, Richard H. King, Norma Landau, Walter S. H. Lim, Thomas Loebel, David W. Lovell, Michele Maggiore, Georgeta Marghescu, Aaron Massecar, Markus Meckl, Tim Murphy, Wan-Hsiang Pan, Marianna Papastephanou, Priscilla Ringrose, Marina Ritzarev, Christian Roy, Karl W. Schweizer, Carlo Scognamiglio, Stanley Shostak, Lora Sigler, Lavinia Stan, Matthew Sterenberg, Jonathan Stoekl, Dan Stone, Linda Toocaram, Barnard Turner, Gabrielle Weinberger & Phillip H. Wiebe - 2008 - The European Legacy 13 (4):499-543.
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  3. Tradition and Revolution in the Rhetoric of Analytic Philosophy.Matthew Sterenberg - 2010 - Philosophy and Literature 34 (1):pp. 161-172.
    It is an unsurprising but unfortunate fact that the history of twentieth-century British philosophy has been almost entirely written by British philosophers themselves. The account produced by philosophers such as G. J. Warnock, Gilbert Ryle, and A. J. Ayer, like all histories written by the winners of disciplinary struggles, amounts to a "Whig narrative" emphasizing the triumph of analytic philosophy over outdated, misguided idealist philosophy—a movement from error to truth. British philosophers built this Whig narrative around a justification of their (...)
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