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  1.  15
    Testing Public Health Ethics: Why the CDC's HIV Screening Recommendations May Violate the Least Infringement Principle.Matthew W. Pierce, Suzanne Maman, Allison K. Groves, Elizabeth J. King & Sarah C. Wyckoff - 2011 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (2):263-271.
    The least infringement principle has been widely endorsed by public health scholars. According to this principle, public health policies may infringe upon “general moral considerations” in order to achieve a public health goal, but if two policies provide the same public health benefit, then policymakers should choose the one that infringes least upon “general moral considerations.” General moral considerations can encompass a wide variety of goals, including fair distribution of burdens and benefits, protection of privacy and confidentiality, and respect for (...)
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    Technologies to Detect Concealed Weapons: Fourth Amendment Limits on a New Public Health and Law Enforcement Tool.Jon S. Vernick, Matthew W. Pierce, Daniel W. Webster, Sara B. Johnson & Shannon Frattaroli - 2003 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (4):567-579.
    Firearm violence is a major public health problem in the United States. In 2000, firearms were used in 10,801 homicides – two-thirds of all homicides in the U.S. – and 533,470 non-fatal criminal victimizations including rapes, robberies, and assaults. The social costs of gun violence in the United States are also staggering, and have been estimated to be on the order of $100 billion per year.Illegal gun carrying, usually concealed, in public places is an important risk factor for firearm-related crime. (...)
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    Technologies to Detect Concealed Weapons: Fourth Amendment Limits on a New Public Health and Law Enforcement Tool.Jon S. Vernick, Matthew W. Pierce, Daniel W. Webster, Sara B. Johnson & Shannon Frattaroli - 2003 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (4):567-579.
    Firearm violence is a major public health problem in the United States. In 2000, firearms were used in 10,801 homicides – two-thirds of all homicides in the U.S. – and 533,470 non-fatal criminal victimizations including rapes, robberies, and assaults. The social costs of gun violence in the United States are also staggering, and have been estimated to be on the order of $100 billion per year.Illegal gun carrying, usually concealed, in public places is an important risk factor for firearm-related crime. (...)
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