Results for 'Matthew W. Wolfe'

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  1.  16
    Interpersonal emotion regulation strategy choice in younger and older adults.J. W. Gurera, Hannah E. Wolfe, Matthew W. E. Murry & Derek M. Isaacowitz - 2022 - Cognition and Emotion 36 (4):643-659.
    When managing their emotions, individuals often recruit the help of others; however, most emotion regulation research has focused on self-regulation. Theories of emotion and aging suggest younger and older adults differ in the emotion regulation strategies they use when regulating their own emotions. If how individuals regulate their own emotions and the emotions of others are related, these theorised age differences may also emerge for interpersonal emotion regulation. In two studies, younger and older adults’ intrapersonal and interpersonal emotion regulation strategy (...)
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  2.  54
    Towards a Levinasian Care Ethic.W. Wolf Diedrich, Roger Burggraeve & Chris Gastmans - 2006 - Ethical Perspectives 13 (1):31-59.
    In this paper, we suggest the likely effects of the application of Emmanuel Levinas’s philosophy to the care ethic, particularly as it is represented by the author Joan Tronto, one of the most cogent exponents of care ethics.Thus, we ask: does Levinas’s philosophy have enough in common with the care ethic to be able to overlap it and fruitfully address shared issues of pressing importance? And, is Levinas’s philosophy different enough to challenge the care ethic and help it grow in (...)
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  3. Symmetry arguments against regular probability: A reply to recent objections.Matthew W. Parker - 2019 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 9 (1):1-21.
    A probability distribution is regular if it does not assign probability zero to any possible event. While some hold that probabilities should always be regular, three counter-arguments have been posed based on examples where, if regularity holds, then perfectly similar events must have different probabilities. Howson and Benci et al. have raised technical objections to these symmetry arguments, but we see here that their objections fail. Howson says that Williamson’s “isomorphic” events are not in fact isomorphic, but Howson is speaking (...)
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  4.  16
    Natural forces as agents: Reconceptualizing the animate–inanimate distinction.Matthew W. Lowder & Peter C. Gordon - 2015 - Cognition 136:85-90.
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  5. The Concept of Logical Consequence: An Introduction to Philosophical Logic.Matthew W. McKeon - 2010 - Peter Lang.
    Introduction -- The concept of logical consequence -- Tarski's characterization of the common concept of logical consequence -- The logical consequence relation has a modal element -- The logical consequence relation is formal -- The logical consequence relation is A priori -- Logical and non-logical terminology -- The meanings of logical terms explained in terms of their semantic properties -- The meanings of logical terms explained in terms of their inferential properties -- Model-theoretic and deductive-theoretic conceptions of logic -- Linguistic (...)
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  6.  26
    Progressing from “Whether to” to “How to” Conduct Pragmatic Trials.Matthew W. Semler, Todd W. Rice & Jonathan D. Casey - 2023 - American Journal of Bioethics 23 (8):33-36.
    In this issue of the American Journal of Bioethics, manuscripts focus on the obligations of clinicians and researchers in pragmatic clinical trials (Garland, Morain, and Sugarman 2023; Morain and L...
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  7.  24
    Grammatical licensing and relative clause parsing in a flexible word-order language.Matthew W. Wagers, Manuel F. Borja & Sandra Chung - 2018 - Cognition 178 (C):207-221.
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  8.  24
    The Importance of Formative Assessment in Science and Engineering Ethics Education: Some Evidence and Practical Advice.Matthew W. Keefer, Sara E. Wilson, Harry Dankowicz & Michael C. Loui - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (1):249-260.
    Recent research in ethics education shows a potentially problematic variation in content, curricular materials, and instruction. While ethics instruction is now widespread, studies have identified significant variation in both the goals and methods of ethics education, leaving researchers to conclude that many approaches may be inappropriately paired with goals that are unachievable. This paper speaks to these concerns by demonstrating the importance of aligning classroom-based assessments to clear ethical learning objectives in order to help students and instructors track their progress (...)
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  9.  26
    Arguments and Reason-Giving.Matthew W. McKeon - 2022 - Argumentation 36 (2):229-247.
    Arguments figure prominently in our practices of reason-giving. For example, we use them to advance reasons for their conclusions in order to justify believing something, to explain why we believe something, and to persuade others to believe something. Intuitively, using arguments in these ways requires a certain degree of self-reflection. In this paper, I ask: what cognitive requirements are there for using an argument to advance reasons for its conclusion? Towards a partial response, the paper’s central thesis is that in (...)
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  10.  14
    Big Data, social physics, and spatial analysis: The early years.Matthew W. Wilson & Trevor J. Barnes - 2014 - Big Data and Society 1 (1).
    This paper examines one of the historical antecedents of Big Data, the social physics movement. Its origins are in the scientific revolution of the 17th century in Western Europe. But it is not named as such until the middle of the 19th century, and not formally institutionalized until another hundred years later when it is associated with work by George Zipf and John Stewart. Social physics is marked by the belief that large-scale statistical measurement of social variables reveals underlying relational (...)
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  11. Philosophical method and Galileo's paradox of infinity.Matthew W. Parker - 2009 - In Bart Van Kerkhove (ed.), New Perspectives on Mathematical Practices: Essays in Philosophy and History of Mathematics. World Scientific.
    We consider an approach to some philosophical problems that I call the Method of Conceptual Articulation: to recognize that a question may lack any determinate answer, and to re-engineer concepts so that the question acquires a definite answer in such a way as to serve the epistemic motivations behind the question. As a case study we examine “Galileo’s Paradox”, that the perfect square numbers seem to be at once as numerous as the whole numbers, by one-to-one correspondence, and yet less (...)
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  12. Levinas' Christian readers : Judaism's other?W. Wolf Diedrich - 2008 - In Roger Burggraeve (ed.), The awakening to the other: a provocative dialogue with Emmanuel Levinas. Dudley, MA: Peeters.
     
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  13.  63
    Comparative infinite lottery logic.Matthew W. Parker - 2020 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 84:28-36.
    As an application of his Material Theory of Induction, Norton (2018; manuscript) argues that the correct inductive logic for a fair infinite lottery, and also for evaluating eternal inflation multiverse models, is radically different from standard probability theory. This is due to a requirement of label independence. It follows, Norton argues, that finite additivity fails, and any two sets of outcomes with the same cardinality and co-cardinality have the same chance. This makes the logic useless for evaluating multiverse models based (...)
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  14. Set Size and the Part–Whole Principle.Matthew W. Parker - 2013 - Review of Symbolic Logic (4):1-24.
    Recent work has defended “Euclidean” theories of set size, in which Cantor’s Principle (two sets have equally many elements if and only if there is a one-to-one correspondence between them) is abandoned in favor of the Part-Whole Principle (if A is a proper subset of B then A is smaller than B). It has also been suggested that Gödel’s argument for the unique correctness of Cantor’s Principle is inadequate. Here we see from simple examples, not that Euclidean theories of set (...)
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  15.  13
    More (of the right strategies) is better: disaggregating the naturalistic between- and within-person structure and effects of emotion regulation strategies.Matthew W. Southward & Jennifer S. Cheavens - 2020 - Cognition and Emotion 34 (8):1729-1736.
    Although people often use multiple strategies to regulate their emotions, it is unclear if using more strategies effectively changes emotional outcomes. This may be because there is no clear, data-...
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  16. Computing the uncomputable; or, The discrete charm of second-order simulacra.Matthew W. Parker - 2009 - Synthese 169 (3):447-463.
    We examine a case in which non-computable behavior in a model is revealed by computer simulation. This is possible due to differing notions of computability for sets in a continuous space. The argument originally given for the validity of the simulation involves a simpler simulation of the simulation, still further simulations thereof, and a universality conjecture. There are difficulties with that argument, but there are other, heuristic arguments supporting the qualitative results. It is urged, using this example, that absolute validation, (...)
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  17. Symmetry arguments against regular probability: A reply to recent objections.Matthew W. Parker - 2018 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 9 (1):8.
    A probability distribution is regular if no possible event is assigned probability zero. While some hold that probabilities should always be regular, three counter-arguments have been posed based on examples where, if regularity holds, then perfectly similar events must have different probabilities. Howson (2017) and Benci et al. (2016) have raised technical objections to these symmetry arguments, but we see here that their objections fail. Howson says that Williamson’s (2007) “isomorphic” events are not in fact isomorphic, but Howson is speaking (...)
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  18. God and evolution.W. R. Matthews - 1926 - New York [etc.]: Longmans, Green and co..
  19.  13
    Relative Clause Effects at the Matrix Verb Depend on Type of Intervening Material.Matthew W. Lowder & Peter C. Gordon - 2021 - Cognitive Science 45 (9):e13039.
    Although a large literature demonstrates that object‐extracted relative clauses (ORCs) are harder to process than subject‐extracted relative clauses (SRCs), there is less agreement regarding where during processing this difficulty emerges, as well as how best to explain these effects. An eye‐tracking study by Staub, Dillon, and Clifton (2017) demonstrated that readers experience more processing difficulty at the matrix verb for ORCs than for SRCs when the matrix verb immediately follows the relative clause (RC), but the difficulty is eliminated if a (...)
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  20.  11
    NRP: Neither Perfusion nor Regional.Matthew W. DeCamp & Lois Snyder Sulmasy - 2024 - American Journal of Bioethics 24 (6):50-53.
    Old habits die hard; so, it seems, do old arguments. Proponents of thoracoabdominal normothermic regional perfusion (TA-NRP, but more commonly referred to as NRP) continue to proffer arguments and...
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  21.  26
    Understanding Morality from an Evolutionary Perspective: Challenges and Opportunities.Matthew W. Keefer - 2013 - Educational Theory 63 (2):113-132.
    In recent years, there has been a proliferation of new research on moral thinking informed by evolutionary theory. The new findings have emanated from a wide variety of fields. While there is no shortage of theoretical models that attempt to account for specific research findings, Matthew Keefer's goals in this essay are more general. First, he examines the strength of the evolutionary approach to understanding morality and moral emotions as adaptations to cooperation. Second, he considers the importance of unconscious (...)
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  22.  26
    Curricular Design And Assessment In Professional Ethics Education.Matthew W. Keefer & Michael Davis - 2012 - Teaching Ethics 13 (1):81-90.
  23.  19
    Editorial: The Role of the Distinctions between Identification/Production and Perceptual/Conceptual Processes in Implicit Memory: Findings from Cognitive Psychology, Neuroscience and Neuropsychology.Matthew W. Prull & Pietro Spataro - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  24.  5
    In Defense of a Normative Concept of Argument.Matthew W. McKeon - forthcoming - Argumentation:1-18.
    Blair articulates a concept of argument that suggests, as he puts it, that argument is a normative concept (Blair, Informal Logic 24:137–151, 2004, p. 190). Put roughly, the idea is that a collection of propositions doesn’t constitute an argument unless some taken together constitute a reason for the remaining proposition and thereby support it enough to provide at least prima facie justification for it (Blair, in: Blair, Johnson, Hansen, Tindale (eds) Informal Logic at 25, Proceedings of the 25th anniversary conference, (...)
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  25.  24
    Testing Public Health Ethics: Why the CDC's HIV Screening Recommendations May Violate the Least Infringement Principle.Matthew W. Pierce, Suzanne Maman, Allison K. Groves, Elizabeth J. King & Sarah C. Wyckoff - 2011 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (2):263-271.
    The least infringement principle has been widely endorsed by public health scholars. According to this principle, public health policies may infringe upon “general moral considerations” in order to achieve a public health goal, but if two policies provide the same public health benefit, then policymakers should choose the one that infringes least upon “general moral considerations.” General moral considerations can encompass a wide variety of goals, including fair distribution of burdens and benefits, protection of privacy and confidentiality, and respect for (...)
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  26.  29
    Mysticism and the Creed. W. F. Cobb.W. R. Matthews - 1915 - International Journal of Ethics 25 (3):413-415.
  27.  23
    You Show Me Yours, I’ll Show You Mine.Matthew W. Knotts - 2017 - Philosophy and Theology 29 (1):83-100.
    The task of this article is to propose an alternative method for adjudicating truth claims between various paradigms. Informed by sources such as Augustine, Aquinas, Heidegger, Gadamer, and Kuhn, I argue for a form of reasoning which aspires to credibility, plausibility, and explanatory capacity, rather than absolute proof. Instead of representing a flight from scientific standards, I argue that such an approach ultimately represents the best hope of safeguarding the essence of science and rationality as such.
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  28.  15
    Eugenics and the family: The national marriage guidance council's Herbert Gray lecture, October 18th, 1961.W. R. Matthews - 1962 - The Eugenics Review 53 (4):193.
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  29. The Destiny of the Soul.W. R. Matthews - 1930 - Hibbert Journal 28 (2):200.
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  30.  18
    A Paper Chase After The Aramaic On Tcl 13 193.Matthew W. Stolper - 1996 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 116 (3):517-521.
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  31. On the Rationale for Distinguishing Arguments from Explanations.Matthew W. McKeon - 2013 - Argumentation 27 (3):283-303.
    Even with the lack of consensus on the nature of an argument, the thesis that explanations and arguments are distinct is near orthodoxy in well-known critical thinking texts and in the more advanced argumentation literature. In this paper, I reconstruct two rationales for distinguishing arguments from explanations. According to one, arguments and explanations are essentially different things because they have different structures. According to the other, while some explanations and arguments may have the same structure, they are different things because (...)
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  32.  34
    Lexical Predictability During Natural Reading: Effects of Surprisal and Entropy Reduction.Matthew W. Lowder, Wonil Choi, Fernanda Ferreira & John M. Henderson - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (S4):1166-1183.
    What are the effects of word-by-word predictability on sentence processing times during the natural reading of a text? Although information complexity metrics such as surprisal and entropy reduction have been useful in addressing this question, these metrics tend to be estimated using computational language models, which require some degree of commitment to a particular theory of language processing. Taking a different approach, this study implemented a large-scale cumulative cloze task to collect word-by-word predictability data for 40 passages and compute surprisal (...)
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  33.  16
    The Greek Concept of Justice: From its Shadow in Homer to its Substance in Plato (review).Matthew W. Dickie - 1980 - Philosophy and Literature 4 (1):135-137.
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  34.  7
    A road to nowhere: the idea of progress and its critics.Matthew W. Slaboch - 2017 - Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.
    Matthew W. Slaboch examines the work of German philosophers Arthur Schopenhauer and Oswald Spengler, Russian novelists Leo Tolstoy and Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, and American historians Henry Adams and Christopher Lasch—rare skeptics of the idea of progress who have much to offer political theory, a field dominated by historical optimists.
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  35.  16
    Some ghost facts from Achaemenid Babylonian texts.Matthew W. Stolper - 1988 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 108:196-198.
  36.  68
    Weintraub’s response to Williamson’s coin flip argument.Matthew W. Parker - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 11 (3):1-21.
    A probability distribution is regular if it does not assign probability zero to any possible event. Williamson argued that we should not require probabilities to be regular, for if we do, certain “isomorphic” physical events must have different probabilities, which is implausible. His remarks suggest an assumption that chances are determined by intrinsic, qualitative circumstances. Weintraub responds that Williamson’s coin flip events differ in their inclusion relations to each other, or the inclusion relations between their times, and this can account (...)
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  37. Do we need a Philosophy of Religion?W. R. Matthews - 1944 - Hibbert Journal 43:194.
     
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  38. Three concepts of decidability for general subsets of uncountable spaces.Matthew W. Parker - 2003 - Theoretical Computer Science 351 (1):2-13.
    There is no uniquely standard concept of an effectively decidable set of real numbers or real n-tuples. Here we consider three notions: decidability up to measure zero [M.W. Parker, Undecidability in Rn: Riddled basins, the KAM tori, and the stability of the solar system, Phil. Sci. 70(2) (2003) 359–382], which we abbreviate d.m.z.; recursive approximability [or r.a.; K.-I. Ko, Complexity Theory of Real Functions, Birkhäuser, Boston, 1991]; and decidability ignoring boundaries [d.i.b.; W.C. Myrvold, The decision problem for entanglement, in: R.S. (...)
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  39. Undecidability in Rn: Riddled basins, the KAM tori, and the stability of the solar system.Matthew W. Parker - 2003 - Philosophy of Science 70 (2):359-382.
    Some have suggested that certain classical physical systems have undecidable long-term behavior, without specifying an appropriate notion of decidability over the reals. We introduce such a notion, decidability in (or d- ) for any measure , which is particularly appropriate for physics and in some ways more intuitive than Ko's (1991) recursive approximability (r.a.). For Lebesgue measure , d- implies r.a. Sets with positive -measure that are sufficiently "riddled" with holes are never d- but are often r.a. This explicates Sommerer (...)
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  40.  20
    Editorial: The Sensation-Cognition Interface: Impact of Early Sensory Experiences on Cognition.W. G. Dye Matthew & Pascalis Olivier - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  41.  30
    The Surplus of the Machine: Trope and History in The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte.Matthew W. Bost & Matthew S. May - 2016 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 49 (1):1-25.
    This article stages a new encounter between rhetoric and the philosophy of Karl Marx. We argue that the configuration of two major tropes in Marx’s 1852 pamphlet The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte renders explicit the operative but implicit logics of Marxian historical materialism. Our reading therefore makes available a novel and untimely dimension of Marx’s conceptual labor where we least expect to find it: in a text that has been largely, but not exclusively, understood as a history of counterrevolution (...)
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  42.  39
    Undecidable long-term behavior in classical physics: Foundations, results, and interpretation.Matthew W. Parker - 2005 - Dissertation, University of Chicago
    The behavior of some systems is non-computable in a precise new sense. One infamous problem is that of the stability of the solar system: Given the initial positions and velocities of several mutually gravitating bodies, will any eventually collide or be thrown off to infinity? Many have made vague suggestions that this and similar problems are undecidable: no finite procedure can reliably determine whether a given configuration will eventually prove unstable. But taken in the most natural way, this is trivial. (...)
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  43. The Problem of Christ in the Twentieth Century, an Essay on the Incarnation.W. R. Matthews - 1951
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  44. Gödel's Argument for Cantorian Cardinality.Matthew W. Parker - 2017 - Noûs 53 (2):375-393.
    On the first page of “What is Cantor's Continuum Problem?”, Gödel argues that Cantor's theory of cardinality, where a bijection implies equal number, is in some sense uniquely determined. The argument, involving a thought experiment with sets of physical objects, is initially persuasive, but recent authors have developed alternative theories of cardinality that are consistent with the standard set theory ZFC and have appealing algebraic features that Cantor's powers lack, as well as some promise for applications. Here we diagnose Gödel's (...)
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  45.  62
    This “Ethical Trap” Is for Roboticists, Not Robots: On the Issue of Artificial Agent Ethical Decision-Making.Keith W. Miller, Marty J. Wolf & Frances Grodzinsky - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (2):389-401.
    In this paper we address the question of when a researcher is justified in describing his or her artificial agent as demonstrating ethical decision-making. The paper is motivated by the amount of research being done that attempts to imbue artificial agents with expertise in ethical decision-making. It seems clear that computing systems make decisions, in that they make choices between different options; and there is scholarship in philosophy that addresses the distinction between ethical decision-making and general decision-making. Essentially, the qualitative (...)
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  46.  39
    A Neurocomputational Model of the N400 and the P600 in Language Processing.Harm Brouwer, Matthew W. Crocker, Noortje J. Venhuizen & John C. J. Hoeks - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (S6):1318-1352.
    Ten years ago, researchers using event-related brain potentials to study language comprehension were puzzled by what looked like a Semantic Illusion: Semantically anomalous, but structurally well-formed sentences did not affect the N400 component—traditionally taken to reflect semantic integration—but instead produced a P600 effect, which is generally linked to syntactic processing. This finding led to a considerable amount of debate, and a number of complex processing models have been proposed as an explanation. What these models have in common is that they (...)
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  47.  16
    Spaces of consumption in environmental history.Matthew W. Klingle - 2003 - History and Theory 42 (4):94–110.
    Consumption has emerged as an important historical subject, with most scholars explaining it as a vehicle for therapeutic regeneration, community formation, or economic policy. This work all but ignores how consumption begins with changes to the material world, to physical nature. While environmental historians have something important, even unique, to say about consumption, the split between materialist and cultural analyses within the field has dulled its ability to study consumption as a process and phenomenon that unfolds over space and time. (...)
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  48.  54
    Transgender Patients, Hospitalists, and Ethical Care.Matthew W. McCarthy, Elizabeth Reis & Joseph J. Fins - 2016 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 59 (2):234-245.
    A 28-year-old female-to-male transgender patient presents to the emergency room with one day of pleuritic chest pain and shortness of breath. The patient is found to have an acute pulmonary embolus and is admitted is to the academic hospitalist teaching service for further management.The transgender population is diverse in gender identity, expression, and sexual orientation. Although estimates vary, one study suggests that 0.3% of adults identify as transgender. The U.S. National Transgender Discrimination Survey revealed that 28% of transgender adults have (...)
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  49.  8
    Teʾumman in the Neo-Assyrian Correspondence.Matthew W. Waters - 1999 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 119 (3):473.
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  50.  17
    Arguments and reason-giving.Matthew W. McKeon - 2024 - New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
    Arguments, understood initially as premise-conclusion complexes of propositions, figure in our practices of giving reasons. Among other uses, we use arguments to advance reasons to explain why we believe or did something, to justify our beliefs or actions, to persuade others to do or to believe something, and (following Pinto 2001b) to advance reasons to worry or to fear that something is true. This book is about our uses of arguments to advance their premises as reasons for believing their conclusions, (...)
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