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Matthias Scheutz [30]Matthias Josef Scheutz [1]Matthias J. Scheutz [1]
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  1.  59
    The “Big Red Button” is Too Late: An Alternative Model for the Ethical Evaluation of AI Systems.Thomas Arnold & Matthias Scheutz - 2018 - Ethics and Information Technology 20 (1):59-69.
    As a way to address both ominous and ordinary threats of artificial intelligence, researchers have started proposing ways to stop an AI system before it has a chance to escape outside control and cause harm. A so-called “big red button” would enable human operators to interrupt or divert a system while preventing the system from learning that such an intervention is a threat. Though an emergency button for AI seems to make intuitive sense, that approach ultimately concentrates on the point (...)
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  2. When Physical Systems Realize Functions.Matthias Scheutz - 1999 - Minds and Machines 9 (2):161-196.
    After briefly discussing the relevance of the notions computation and implementation for cognitive science, I summarize some of the problems that have been found in their most common interpretations. In particular, I argue that standard notions of computation together with a state-to-state correspondence view of implementation cannot overcome difficulties posed by Putnam's Realization Theorem and that, therefore, a different approach to implementation is required. The notion realization of a function, developed out of physical theories, is then introduced as a replacement (...)
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  3.  34
    Against the Moral Turing Test: Accountable Design and the Moral Reasoning of Autonomous Systems.Thomas Arnold & Matthias Scheutz - 2016 - Ethics and Information Technology 18 (2):103-115.
    This paper argues against the moral Turing test as a framework for evaluating the moral performance of autonomous systems. Though the term has been carefully introduced, considered, and cautioned about in previous discussions :251–261, 2000; Allen and Wallach 2009), it has lingered on as a touchstone for developing computational approaches to moral reasoning :98–109, 2015). While these efforts have not led to the detailed development of an MTT, they nonetheless retain the idea to discuss what kinds of action and reasoning (...)
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  4.  79
    Computational Vs. Causal Complexity.Matthias Scheutz - 2001 - Minds and Machines 11 (4):543-566.
    The main claim of this paper is that notions of implementation based on an isomorphic correspondence between physical and computational states are not tenable. Rather, ``implementation'' has to be based on the notion of ``bisimulation'' in order to be able to block unwanted implementation results and incorporate intuitions from computational practice. A formal definition of implementation is suggested, which satisfies theoretical and practical requirements and may also be used to make the functionalist notion of ``physical realization'' precise. The upshot of (...)
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  5.  16
    Computational Versus Causal Complexity.Matthias Scheutz - 2001 - Minds and Machines 11 (4):543-566.
    The main claim of this paper is that notions of implementation based on an isomorphic correspondence between physical and computational states are not tenable. Rather, ``implementation'' has to be based on the notion of ``bisimulation'' in order to be able to block unwanted implementation results and incorporate intuitions from computational practice. A formal definition of implementation is suggested, which satisfies theoretical and practical requirements and may also be used to make the functionalist notion of ``physical realization'' precise. The upshot of (...)
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  6.  41
    Computationalism: New Directions.Matthias Scheutz (ed.) - 2002 - MIT Press.
    A new computationalist view of the mind that takes into account real-world issues of embodiment, interaction, physical implementation, and semantics.
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  7. Computationalism: The Next Generation.Matthias Scheutz - 2002 - In Computationalism: New Directions. MIT Press. pp. 517-524.
  8.  10
    AI in the Sky: How People Morally Evaluate Human and Machine Decisions in a Lethal Strike Dilemma.Bertram F. Malle, Stuti Thapa Magar & Matthias Scheutz - 2019 - In Maria Isabel Aldinhas Ferreira, João Silva Sequeira, Gurvinder Singh Virk, Mohammad Osman Tokhi & Endre E. Kadar (eds.), Robotics and Well-Being. Springer Verlag. pp. 111-133.
    Even though morally competent artificial agents have yet to emerge in society, we need insights from empirical science into how people will respond to such agents and how these responses should inform agent design. Three survey studies presented participants with an artificial intelligence agent, an autonomous drone, or a human drone pilot facing a moral dilemma in a military context: to either launch a missile strike on a terrorist compound but risk the life of a child, or to cancel the (...)
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  9.  55
    Towards a Conceptual and Methodological Framework for Determining Robot Believability.Robert Rose, Matthias Scheutz & Paul Schermerhorn - 2010 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 11 (2):314-335.
    Making interactions between humans and artificial agents successful is a major goal of interaction design. The aim of this paper is to provide researchers conducting interaction studies a new framework for the evaluation of robot believability. By critically examining the ordinary sense of believability, we first argue that currently available notions of it are underspecified for rigorous application in an experimental setting. We then define four concepts that capture different senses of believability, each of which connects directly to an empirical (...)
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  10.  41
    In Praise of a Model but Not Its Conclusions: Commentary on Cooper, Catmur, and Heyes (2012).Bennett I. Bertenthal & Matthias Scheutz - 2013 - Cognitive Science 37 (4):631-641.
    Cooper et al. (this issue) develop an interactive activation model of spatial and imitative compatibilities that simulates the key results from Catmur and Heyes (2011) and thus conclude that both compatibilities are mediated by the same processes since their single model can predict all the results. Although the model is impressive, the conclusions are premature because they are based on an incomplete review of the relevant literature and because the model includes some questionable assumptions. Moreover, a competing model (Scheutz & (...)
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  11.  16
    Effects of Morphosyntactic Gender Features in Bilingual Language Processing*,*.Matthias J. Scheutz & Kathleen M. Eberhard - 2004 - Cognitive Science 28 (4):559-588.
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  12.  22
    Dissociating Ideomotor and Spatial Compatibility: Empirical Evidence and Connectionist Models.Ty W. Boyer, Matthias Scheutz & Bennett I. Bertenthal - 2009 - In N. A. Taatgen & H. van Rijn (eds.), Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. pp. 2280--2285.
  13.  40
    “Causation‘ is Only Part of the Answer.Matthias Scheutz - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (5):634-635.
    Although Ross & Spurrett (R&S) successfully fend off the threat of Kim's “supervenience argument” by showing that it conflates different notions of causation, their proposal for a dynamic systems answer to the mind-body problem is itself yet another supervenience claim in need of an explanation that justifies it. The same goes for their notion of “multiple supervenience.”.
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  14.  5
    Robotics and Well-Being.Maria Isabel Aldinhas Ferreira, Ana S. Aníbal, P. Beardsley, Selmer Bringsjord, Paulo S. Carvalho, Raja Chatila, Vladimir Estivill-Castro, Nicola Fabiano, Sarah R. Fletcher, Rodolphe Gelin, Rikhiya Ghosh, Naveen Sundar Govindarajulu, John C. Havens, Teegan L. Johnson, Endre E. Kadar, Jon Larreina, Pedro U. Lima, Stuti Thapa Magar, Bertram F. Malle, André Martins, Michael P. Musielewicz, A. Mylaeus, Matthew Peveler, Matthias Scheutz, João Silva Sequeira, R. Siegwart, B. Tranter & A. Vempati (eds.) - 2019 - Springer Verlag.
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  15.  22
    HRI Ethics and Type-Token Ambiguity: What Kind of Robotic Identity is Most Responsible?Thomas Arnold & Matthias Scheutz - 2020 - Ethics and Information Technology 22 (4):357-366.
    This paper addresses ethical challenges posed by a robot acting as both a general type of system and a discrete, particular machine. Using the philosophical distinction between “type” and “token,” we locate type-token ambiguity within a larger field of indefinite robotic identity, which can include networked systems or multiple bodies under a single control system. The paper explores three specific areas where the type-token tension might affect human–robot interaction, including how a robot demonstrates the highly personalized recounting of information, how (...)
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  16. The Tactile Ethics of Soft Robotics: Designing Wisely for Human–Robot Interaction.Thomas Arnold & Matthias Scheutz - 2017 - Soft Robotics 4 (2):81-87.
    Soft robots promise an exciting design trajectory in the field of robotics and human–robot interaction (HRI), promising more adaptive, resilient movement within environments as well as a safer, more sensitive interface for the objects or agents the robot encounters. In particular, tactile HRI is a critical dimension for designers to consider, especially given the onrush of assistive and companion robots into our society. In this article, we propose to surface an important set of ethical challenges for the field of soft (...)
     
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  17.  14
    Multi-Modal Referring Expressions in Human-Human Task Descriptions and Their Implications for Human-Robot Interaction.Stephanie Gross, Brigitte Krenn & Matthias Scheutz - 2016 - Interaction Studies 17 (2):180-210.
    Human instructors often refer to objects and actions involved in a task description using both linguistic and non-linguistic means of communication. Hence, for robots to engage in natural human-robot interactions, we need to better understand the various relevant aspects of human multi-modal task descriptions. We analyse reference resolution to objects in a data collection comprising two object manipulation tasks and find that 78.76% of all referring expressions to the objects relevant in Task 1 are verbally underspecified and 88.64% of all (...)
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  18. Causal Vs. Computational Complexity?Matthias Scheutz - 2001 - Minds and Machines 11:534-566.
  19. Ethology and Functionalism: Behavioral Descriptions as the Link Between Physical and Functional Descriptions.Matthias Scheutz - 2001 - Evolution and Cognition 7 (2):164-171.
  20. Explicating the Epistemological Role of Simulation in the Development of Theories of Cognition.Matthias Scheutz & Markus F. Peschl - 2001 - In Proceedings of the 7th International Colloquium on Cognitive.
     
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  21. Implementation: Computationalism's Weak Spot.Matthias Scheutz - 1998 - Conceptus JG 31 (79):229-239.
  22.  27
    Is There More to “Model” Than “Muddle”?Matthias Scheutz - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (6):1076-1077.
    Any discussion comparing different models with respect to their quality qua models must presuppose a notion of model, that is, what it is to be a model. While Webb provides seven criteria to assess the quality of various proposed biorobotic models, she does not clarify the very notion of “model of animal behavior” itself.
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  23.  25
    Max Urchs: Maschine, Körper, Geist - Eine Einführung in Die Kognitionswissenschaften. Frankfurt Am Main: Vittorio Klostermann, 2002.Matthias Scheutz - 2004 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 67 (1):258-261.
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  24.  36
    New Computationalism.Matthias Scheutz - 2002 - Conceptus Studien 14.
  25. Philosophical Issues About Computation.Matthias Scheutz - 2002 - In Lynn Nadel (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Macmillan.
     
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  26. Proceedings of the Sixth Congress of the Austrian Philosophical Society.Matthias Scheutz & Markus F. Peschl - 2001
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  27. Proceedings of the 7th International Colloquium on Cognitive.Matthias Scheutz & Markus F. Peschl - 2001
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  28. Some Thoughts on Computation and Simulation in Cognitive Science.Matthias Scheutz & Markus F. Peschl - 2001 - In Proceedings of the Sixth Congress of the Austrian Philosophical Society.
  29. The Cognitive Computational Story.Matthias Scheutz - 2000 - Conceptus Studien 14:136-152.
  30. The Ontological Status of Representations.Matthias Scheutz - 1999 - In Alexander Riegler, Markus F. Peschl & A. von Stein (eds.), Understanding Representation in the Cognitive Sciences. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
     
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  31.  4
    What I Am: The Self as a Dynamic Data Structure Implemented Within a Cognitive Framework by a Functional System. [REVIEW]Matthias Scheutz - 2001 - PSYCHE: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Research On Consciousness 7.
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