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  1.  48
    Rationality and the Genetic Challenge: Making People Better?Matti Häyry - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Seven ways of making people better; 2. Rational approaches to the genetic challenge; 3. The best babies and parental responsibility; 4. Deaf embryos, morality, and the law; 5. Saviour siblings and treating people as a means; 6. Reproductive cloning and designing human beings; 7. Embryonic stem cells, vulnerability, and sanctity; 8. Gene therapies, hopes, and fears; 9. Considerable life extension and the meaning of life; 10. Taking the genetic challenge rationally.
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  2.  14
    Doctrines and Dimensions of Justice: Their Historical Backgrounds and Ideological Underpinnings.Matti Häyry - 2018 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 27 (2):188-216.
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  3.  8
    Causation, Responsibility, and Harm: How the Discursive Shift From Law and Ethics to Social Justice Sealed the Plight of Nonhuman Animals.Matti Häyry - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (2):246-267.
    Moral and political philosophers no longer condemn harm inflicted on nonhuman animals as self-evidently as they did when animal welfare and animal rights advocacy was at the forefront in the 1980s, and sentience, suffering, species-typical behavior, and personhood were the basic concepts of the discussion. The article shows this by comparing the determination with which societies seek responsibility for human harm to the relative indifference with which law and morality react to nonhuman harm. When harm is inflicted on humans, policies (...)
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  4.  12
    Justice and the Possibility of Good Moralism in Bioethics.Matti Häyry - 2019 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 28 (2):236-263.
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  5.  26
    The COVID-19 Pandemic: Healthcare Crisis Leadership as Ethics Communication.Matti Häyry - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (1):42-50.
    Governmental reactions to crises like the COVID-19 pandemic can be seen as ethics communication. Governments can contain the disease and thereby mitigate the detrimental public health impact; allow the virus to spread to reach herd immunity; test, track, isolate, and treat; and suppress the disease regionally. An observation of Sweden and Finland showed a difference in feasible ways to communicate the chosen policy to the citizenry. Sweden assumed the herd immunity strategy and backed it up with health utilitarian arguments. This (...)
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  6.  16
    The COVID-19 Pandemic: A Month of Bioethics in Finland.Matti Häyry - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (1):114-122.
    The role of bioethicists amidst crises like the COVID-19 pandemic is not well defined. As professionals in the field, they should respond, but how? The observation of the early days of pandemic confinement in Finland showed that moral philosophers with limited experience in bioethics tended to apply their favorite theories to public decisions, with varying results. Medical ethicists were more likely to lend support to the public authorities by soothing or descriptive accounts of the solutions assumed. These are approaches that (...)
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  7.  4
    Research Ethics and Justice: The Case of Finland.Tuija Takala & Matti Häyry - 2019 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 28 (3):551-576.
    :This paper explores how Finnish research ethics deals with matters of justice on the levels of practical regulation, political morality, and theoretical studies. The bioethical sets of principles introduced by Tom Beauchamp and James Childress in the United States and Jacob Dahl Rendtorff and Peter Kemp in Europe provide the conceptual background, together with a recently introduced conceptual map of theories of justice and their dimensions. The most striking finding is that the internationally recognized requirement of informed consent for research (...)
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  8. Philosophical Arguments for and Against Human Reproductive Cloning.Matti Hayry - 2003 - Bioethics 17 (5-6):447-460.
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  9.  60
    European Values in Bioethics: Why, What, and How to Be Used. [REVIEW]Matti Häyry - 2003 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 24 (3):199-214.
    Are there distinctly European values in bioethics, and if there are, what are they? Some Continental philosophers have argued that the principles of dignity, precaution, and solidarity reflect the European ethos better than the liberal concepts of autonomy, harm, and justice. These principles, so the argument goes, elevate prudence over hedonism, communality over individualism, and moral sense over pragmatism. Contrary to what their proponents often believe, however, dignity, precaution, and solidarity can be interpreted in many ways, and it is not (...)
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  10.  6
    Just Better Utilitarianism.Matti Häyry - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (2):343-367.
    Utilitarianism could still be a viable moral and political theory, although an emphasis on justice as distributing burdens and benefits has hidden this from current conversations. The traditional counterexamples prove that we have good grounds for rejecting classical, aggregative forms of consequentialism. A nonaggregative, liberal form of utilitarianism is immune to this rejection. The cost is that it cannot adjudicate when the basic needs of individuals or groups are in conflict. Cases like this must be solved by other methods. This (...)
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  11.  13
    What Do You Think of Philosophical Bioethics?Matti Häyry - 2015 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 24 (2):139-148.
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  12.  42
    Genetic Ignorance, Moral Obligations and Social Duties.Tuija Takala & Matti Häyry - 2000 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (1):107 – 113.
    In a contribution to The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy , Professor Rosamond Rhodes argues that individuals sometimes have an obligation to know about their genetic disorders, because this is required by their status as autonomous persons. Her analysis, which is based on Kant's concept of autonomy and Aristotle's notion of friendship, is extended here to consequentialist concerns. These are of paramount importance if, as we believe and Professor Rhodes herself implies, the Kantian and Aristotelian doctrines can be helpful only (...)
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  13.  23
    Disability as a Test of Justice in a Globalising World.Matti Häyry & Simo Vehmas - 2015 - Journal of Global Ethics 11 (1):90-98.
    This paper shows how most modern theories of justice could require or at least condone international aid aimed at alleviating the ill effects of disability. Seen from the general viewpoint of liberal egalitarianism, this is moderately encouraging, since according to the creed people in bad positions should be aided, and disability tends to put people in such positions. The actual responses of many theories, including John Rawls's famous view of justice, remain, however, unclear. Communitarian, liberal egalitarian, and luck egalitarian thinkers (...)
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  14.  16
    What Exactly Did You Claim?Matti Häyry - 2015 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 24 (1):107-112.
  15.  77
    Genetic Information, Rights, and Autonomy.Matti Häyry & Tuija Takala - 2001 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (5):403-414.
    Rights, autonomy, privacy, and confidentialityare concepts commonly used in discussionsconcerning genetic information. When theseconcepts are thought of as denoting absolutenorms and values which cannot be overriden byother considerations, conflicts among themnaturally occur.In this paper, these and related notions areexamined in terms of the duties and obligationsmedical professionals and their clients canhave regarding genetic knowledge. It issuggested that while the prevailing idea ofautonomy is unhelpful in the analysis of theseduties, and the ensuing rights, an alternativereading of personal self-determination canprovide a firmer (...)
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  16.  31
    Considerable Life Extension and Three Views on the Meaning of Life.Matti Häyry - 2011 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (1):21-29.
    Picture this. You are having your regular medical checkup, when, all of a sudden, the physician turns to you and says: “Oh, did I remember to mention that you can now live forever?” You look at the doctor enquiringly and she goes on: “Well, it’s not actual immortality, you know, but they’ve invented this treatment—I don’t have the full details—that stops aging, getting physically older. It might not be for everyone, but you seem to be a suitable candidate. You could (...)
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  17.  21
    Academic Freedom, Public Reactions, and Anonymity.Matti Häyry - 2014 - Bioethics 28 (4):170-173.
    Academic freedom can be defined as immunity against adverse reactions from the general public, designed to keep scholars unintimidated and productive even after they have published controversial ideas. Francesca Minerva claims that this notion of strict instrumental academic freedom is supported by Ronald Dworkin, and that anonymity would effectively defend the sphere of immunity implied by it. Against this, I argue that the idea defended by Minerva finds no support in the work by Dworkin referred to; that anonymity would not (...)
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  18.  24
    Precaution and Solidarity.Matti Häyry - 2005 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 14 (2):199-206.
    Health care services are constantly assessed by their ability to accommodate values popular in contemporary societies. Autonomy, justice, and human dignity have for some time been among such values in the affluent West. Relative newcomers in the field are the notions of and which seem to attract, in particular, Continental European ethicists. a.
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  19.  4
    Discoursive Humanity as a Transcendental Basis for Cognitive Ability Ethics and Policies.Matti Häyry - 2016 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 25 (2):262-271.
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  20.  20
    Another Look at Dignity.Matti Häyry - 2004 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 13 (1):7-14.
    With the considerable attention given to UNESCO's Universal Declaration on the Human Genome and Human Rights, the time has come to take another look at the concept of dignity, on which this document is morally founded. The term “dignity” now appears in many national constitutions and international bioethical statements. It has also become popular among Continental European ethicists, many of whom wish to challenge the particularly American and overtly individualistic principles of “autonomy,” “justice,” “beneficence,” and “nonmaleficence.” a.
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  21.  30
    Protecting Humanity.Matti Häyry - 2012 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 21 (2):211-222.
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  22.  54
    Liberal Utilitarianism and Applied Ethics.Matti Hayry - 1994 - Routledge.
    _Liberal Utilitarianism and Applied Ethics_ explores the foundations of early utilitarianism and, at the same time, the theoretical bases of social ethics and policy in modern Western welfare states. Matti Hayry sees the main reason for utilitarianism's growing disrepute among moral philosophers is that its principles cannot legitimately be extended to situations where the basic needs of the individuals involved are in conflict. He is able to formulate a solution to this fundamental problem by arguing convincingly that by combining a (...)
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  23. A Defense of Ethical Relativism.Matti Häyry - 2005 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 14 (1):7-12.
    Relativism is usually a derogatory word in philosophical bioethics in the West. If people make the mistake of trying to understand radically “different” points of view, an accusation of relativism is quickly forthcoming. But why should this be an accusation? My aim in this paper is to demonstrate that it should not.
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  24.  2
    Bioethics and Social Reality.Matti Häyry, Tuija Takala & Peter Herissone-Kelly - 2005 - Rodopi.
    This book explores the many connections that bioethical thinking has with social reality. Bioethics, if it is to be effective, must engage with and address the actualities of modern life: policies, regulations, markets, opinions, and technological advances. In these original contributions fifteen notable scholars working in the North West of England take on this challenge.Values in Bioethics makes available original philosophical books in all areas of bioethics, including medical and nursing ethics, health care ethics, research ethics, environmental ethics, and global (...)
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  25.  48
    Benefiting From Past Wrongdoing, Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines, and the Fragility of the German Legal Position.Tuija Takala & Matti Häyry - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (3):150–159.
    This paper examines the logic and morality of the German Stem Cell Act of 2002. After a brief description of the law’s scope and intent, its ethical dimensions are analysed in terms of symbolic threats, indirect consequences, and the encouragement of immorality. The conclusions are twofold. For those who want to accept the law, the arguments for its rationality and morality can be sound. For others, the emphasis on the uniqueness of the German experience, the combination of absolute and qualified (...)
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  26.  9
    Genetic Engineering and the Risk of Harm.Matti Häyry & Tuija Takala - 1998 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 1 (1):61-64.
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  27.  10
    Scratching the Surface of Bioethics.Matti Häyry & Tuija Takala (eds.) - 2003 - Rodopi.
    WHAT IS BIOETHICS ALL ABOUT? A START Matti Hayry and Tuija Takala. A Start What is bioethics all about? Is it only about medicine, nursing, and healthcare? ...
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  28.  6
    Increasing the Sum Total of General Intelligence, As Measured by Individual IQ Scores.Matti Häyry - 2016 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 25 (3):505-514.
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  29.  39
    Synthetic Biology and Ethics: Past, Present, and Future.Matti Häyry - 2017 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 26 (2):186-205.
    :This article explores the ethical issues that have been identified in emerging technologies, from early genetic engineering to synthetic biology. The scientific advances in the field form a continuum, and some ethical considerations can be raised time and again when new developments occur. An underlying concern is the cumulative effect of scientific advances and ensuing technological innovation that can change our understanding of life and humanity.
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  30.  37
    Guest Editorial: Yet Another Emerging Technology: Old and New Questions Posed by Synthetic Biology.Tuija Takala & Matti Häyry - 2017 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 26 (2):183-185.
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  31.  79
    The Tension Between Self-Governance and Absolute Inner Worth in Kant's Moral Philosophy.Matti Häyry - 2007 - The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 1 (11):153-157.
    In contemporary discussions on practical ethics, the concepts of autonomy and dignity have frequently been opposed. This tendency has been particularly visible in controversies regarding cloning, abortion, organ sales, and euthanasia. Freedom of research and freedom of choice, as instances of professional and personal autonomy, have been cited in arguments favouring these practices, while the dignity and sanctity of human life have been evoked in arguments against them. In the moral theory of Immanuel Kant, however, the concepts of autonomy and (...)
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  32.  22
    Genetic Engineering and the Risk of Harm.Matti Häyry - 1998 - Medicine, Healthcare and Philosophy 1 (1):61-64.
  33.  27
    Utilitarianism, Human Rights and the Redistribution of Health Through Preventive Medical Measures.Heta Häyry & Matti Häyry - 1989 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 6 (1):43-52.
  34.  41
    Rationality and the Genetic Challenge Revisited.Matti Häyry - 2011 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (3):468-483.
  35.  1
    Passive Obedience and Berkeley’s Moral Philosophy.Matti Häyry - 2012 - Berkeley Studies 23:3-14.
    In Passive Obedience Berkeley argues that we must always observe the prohibitions decreed by our sovereign rulers. He defends this thesis both by providing critiques against opposing views and, more interestingly, by presenting a moral theory that supports it. The theory contains elements of divine - command, natural - law, moral - sense, rule - based, and outcome - oriented ethics. Ultimately, however, it seems to rest on a notion of spiritual reason — a specific God - given faculty that (...)
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  36.  45
    Ethicalization in Bioscience—A Pilot Study in Finland.Matti Häyry, Jukka Takala, Piia Jallinoja, Salla Lötjönen & Tuija Takala - 2006 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (3):282-284.
    Concepts that refer to trends like globalization and medicalization have, of late, become a hallmark of public debates. The logic of such concepts is that the same word can refer both to good and bad developments, partly depending on the chosen viewpoint. Hardly anyone opposes the global enforcement of human rights, but the global liberation of trade is sometimes viewed with suspicion. In a similar vein, advances in medicine are seldom seen as a bad thing, but medical solutions to social (...)
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  37.  16
    Response to Special Section: “Cloning: Technology, Policy, and Ethics” (CQ Vol 7, No 2).Matti Häyry - 2001 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (2):205-208.
    The idea of cloning adult human beings often gives rise to objections involving mad dictators producing copies of themselves, or deranged billionaires who want to live forever. But what about situations where we can more readily understand and accept the reasons for creating a clone? Consider, for instance, the case of parents who have simultaneously lost their newly born child and found out that they cannot have any more children of their own by other known methods. Would it be wrong (...)
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  38.  18
    Response to Special Section: “Cloning: Technology, Policy, and Ethics” (CQ Vol 7, No 2) But What If We Feel That Cloning Is Wrong? [REVIEW]Matti Häyry - 2001 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (2):205-208.
    The idea of cloning adult human beings often gives rise to objections involving mad dictators producing copies of themselves, or deranged billionaires who want to live forever. But what about situations where we can more readily understand and accept the reasons for creating a clone? Consider, for instance, the case of parents who have simultaneously lost their newly born child and found out that they cannot have any more children of their own by other known methods. Would it be wrong (...)
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  39.  27
    Neuroethical Theories.Matti Häyry - 2010 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (2):165.
    Neuroethics addresses moral, legal, and social questions created or highlighted by theoretical and practical developments in neuroscience. Practices in need of scrutiny currently include at least brain imaging with new techniques, chemical attempts to shift exceptional brain function toward normality, chemical attempts to enhance ordinary brain function beyond normality, and brain manipulation by other methods.Matti H ja paha.
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  40.  16
    Health Care as a Right, Fairness and Medical Resources.Matti Hayry & Heta Hayry - 1990 - Bioethics 4 (1):1–21.
    There is a growing feeling in many Western countries that every human being has a right to health, or a right to health care. This feeling is reflected in a declaration of the World Health Organization (WHO) from 1976, which states: The enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health is one of the fundamental rights of every human being without distinction of race, religion, political belief, economic or social condition. Our intention in the following is to use the WHO (...)
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  41.  7
    Precaution and Solidarity.Matti Hayry - 2005 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 14 (2):199-206.
    Health care services are constantly assessed by their ability to accommodate values popular in contemporary societies. Autonomy, justice, and human dignity have for some time been among such values in the affluent West. Relative newcomers in the field are the notions of “precaution” and “solidarity,” which seem to attract, in particular, Continental European ethicists. a.
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  42.  29
    Generous Funding for Interventive Aging Research Now?Matti Häyry - 2007 - Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 1 (1).
  43.  22
    Some Additional Thoughts on Considerable Life Extension and the Meaning of Life.Matti Häyry - 2014 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (1):68-72.
  44.  8
    Aids Now.Heta Häyry & Matti Hayry - 1987 - Bioethics 1 (4):339–356.
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  45.  13
    Neuroethics and Animals: Methods and Philosophy.Tuija Takala & Matti Häyry - 2014 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (2):182-187.
    This article provides an overview of the six other contributions in the Neuroethics and Animals special section. In addition, it discusses the methodological and theoretical problems of interdisciplinary fields. The article suggests that interdisciplinary approaches without established methodological and theoretical bases are difficult to assess scientifically. This might cause these fields to expand without actually advancing.
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  46. Liberal Utilitarianism and Applied Ethics.Matti Hayry - 1994 - Routledge.
    _Liberal Utilitarianism and Applied Ethics_ explores the foundations of early utilitarianism and, at the same time, the theoretical bases of social ethics and policy in modern Western welfare states. Matti Hayry sees the main reason for utilitarianism's growing disrepute among moral philosophers is that its principles cannot legitimately be extended to situations where the basic needs of the individuals involved are in conflict. He is able to formulate a solution to this fundamental problem by arguing convincingly that by combining a (...)
     
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  47.  17
    Hard and Soft Offers as Constraints.Matti Häyry & Timo Airaksinen - 1988 - Philosophia 18 (4):385-398.
  48.  27
    Response to “Abortion and Assent” by Rosamond Rhodes.Matti Häyry - 2001 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (1):79-87.
    Abortions are legally permitted in most Western societies if there is a reasonable expectation that the child, if born, would be physically or mentally disabled. Even late-term abortions, which would not be allowed in the case of healthy fetuses, are accepted on the basis of foreseen disability.
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  49.  60
    Obedience to Rules and Berkeley's Theological Utilitarianism.Matti Häyry & Heta Häyry - 1994 - Utilitas 6 (2):233.
    According to what one might call ‘indirect” forms of utilitarian thinking, the proper end of all human action is the greatest happiness of the greatest number of individuals, but due to the fallibility of moral agents this end cannot, and must not, be directly pursued. Instead, according to at least one version of the indirect theory, moral agents have a duty to act in conformity with a set of general rules which, in their turn, have been designed to promote the (...)
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  50.  24
    Arguments and Analysis in Bioethics.Matti Häyry (ed.) - 2010 - Rodopi.
    The twenty-one chapters in this volume strive, through the use of high quality argument and analysis, to get a good deal clearer concerning a range of issues ...
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