64 found
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  1. Monothematic Delusions: Towards a Two-Factor Account.Martin Davies, Max Coltheart, Robyn Langdon & N. Breen - 2001 - Philosophy, Psychiatry and Psychology 8 (2-3):133-58.
    We provide a battery of examples of delusions against which theoretical accounts can be tested. Then, we identify neuropsychological anomalies that could produce the unusual experiences that may lead, in turn, to the delusions in our battery. However, we argue against Maher’s view that delusions are false beliefs that arise as normal responses to anomalous experiences. We propose, instead, that a second factor is required to account for the transition from unusual experience to delusional belief. The second factor in the (...)
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  2. DRC: A Dual Route Cascaded Model of Visual Word Recognition and Reading Aloud.Max Coltheart, Kathleen Rastle, Conrad Perry, Robyn Langdon & Johannes Ziegler - 2001 - Psychological Review 108 (1):204-256.
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  3.  20
    Towards a Universal Model of Reading.Ram Frost, Christina Behme, Madeleine El Beveridge, Thomas H. Bak, Jeffrey S. Bowers, Max Coltheart, Stephen Crain, Colin J. Davis, S. Hélène Deacon & Laurie Beth Feldman - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (5):263.
    In the last decade, reading research has seen a paradigmatic shift. A new wave of computational models of orthographic processing that offer various forms of noisy position or context-sensitive coding have revolutionized the field of visual word recognition. The influx of such models stems mainly from consistent findings, coming mostly from European languages, regarding an apparent insensitivity of skilled readers to letter order. Underlying the current revolution is the theoretical assumption that the insensitivity of readers to letter order reflects the (...)
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  4. Abductive Inference and Delusional Belief.Max Coltheart, Peter Menzies & John Sutton - 2010 - Cognitive Neuropsychiatry 15 (1):261-287.
    Delusional beliefs have sometimes been considered as rational inferences from abnormal experiences. We explore this idea in more detail, making the following points. Firstly, the abnormalities of cognition which initially prompt the entertaining of a delusional belief are not always conscious and since we prefer to restrict the term “experience” to consciousness we refer to “abnormal data” rather than “abnormal experience”. Secondly, we argue that in relation to many delusions (we consider eight) one can clearly identify what the abnormal cognitive (...)
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  5.  28
    Modularity and Cognition.Max Coltheart - 1999 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (3):115-120.
  6.  69
    The Cognitive Neuropsychology of Delusions.Robyn Langdon & Max Coltheart - 2000 - Mind and Language 15 (1):183-216.
  7.  14
    Cumulative Semantic Inhibition in Picture Naming: Experimental and Computational Studies.David Howard, Lyndsey Nickels, Max Coltheart & Jennifer Cole-Virtue - 2006 - Cognition 100 (3):464-482.
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  8.  44
    Is There a Causal Link From Phonological Awareness to Success in Learning to Read?Anne Castles & Max Coltheart - 2004 - Cognition 91 (1):77-111.
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  9.  97
    Introduction: Pathologies of Belief.Martin Davies & Max Coltheart - 2000 - Mind and Language 15 (1):1–46.
    who are unrecognizable because they are in disguise. ¼ The person I see in the mirror is not really me. ¼ A person I knew who died is nevertheless in the hospital ward today. ¼ This arm [the speaker’s left arm] is not mine it is yours; you have..
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  10.  76
    Towards an Understanding of Delusions of Misidentification: Four Case Studies.Nora Breen, Diana Caine, Max Coltheart, Julie Hendy & Corrine Roberts - 2000 - Mind and Language 15 (1):74–110.
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  11.  6
    Varieties of Developmental Dyslexia.Anne Castles & Max Coltheart - 1993 - Cognition 47 (2):149-180.
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  12. From the Internal Lexicon to Delusional Belief.Max Coltheart - 2015 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies (3/2014):19-29.
    In this overview, Author presents the development of his approach—the twofactor account of delusions—drawing attention to the neuropsychological research on delusions (the role of brain damage in the formation of delusions), as well as to the differences between explaining monothematic and polythematic delusions (this differentiation is not analyzed in detail in the present volume). He also sketches the most promising issues in the current research on delusions.
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  13.  1
    Monothematic Delusions: Towards a Two-Factor Account.Martin Davies, Max Coltheart, Robyn Langdon & Nora Breen - 2001 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 8 (2):133-158.
    Article copyright 2002. We provide a battery of examples of delusions against which theoretical accounts can be tested. Then we identify neuropsychological anomalies that could produce the unusual experiences that may lead, in turn, to the delusions in our battery. However, we argue against Maher's view that delusions are false beliefs that arise as normal responses to anomalous experiences. We propose, instead, that a second factor is required to account for the transition from unusual experience to delusional belief. The second (...)
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  14. Conscious Experience and Delusional Belief.Max Coltheart - 2005 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (2):153-157.
  15.  32
    The Fregoli Delusion: A Disorder of Person Identification and Tracking.Robyn Langdon, Emily Connaughton & Max Coltheart - 2014 - Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (4):615-631.
    Fregoli delusion is the mistaken belief that some person currently present in the deluded person's environment is a familiar person in disguise. The stranger is believed to be psychologically identical to this known person even though the deluded person perceives the physical appearance of the stranger as being different from the known person's typical appearance. To gain a deeper understanding of this contradictory error in the normal system for tracking and identifying known persons, we conducted a detailed survey of all (...)
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  16. Pathologies of Belief.Martin Davies & Max Coltheart - 2000 - Mind and Language 15:1-46.
    In this book, psychologists and philosophers describe and discuss a range of case studies of delusional beliefs, drawing out general lessons both for the cognitive architecture of the mind and for the notion of rationality, and exploring connections between the delusional beliefs that occur in schizophrenia and the flawed understanding of beliefs that is characteristic of autism.
     
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  17.  37
    Lessons From Cognitive Neuropsychology for Cognitive Science: A Reply to Patterson and Plaut (2009).Max Coltheart - 2010 - Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (1):3-11.
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  18.  7
    The Neuronal Recycling Hypothesis for Reading and the Question of Reading Universals.Max Coltheart - 2014 - Mind and Language 29 (3):255-269.
    Are there universals of reading? There are three ways of construing this question. Is the region of the brain where reading is implemented identical regardless of what writing system the reader uses? Is the mental information-processing system used for reading the same regardless of what writing system the reader uses. Do the word's writing systems share certain universal features? Dehaene offers affirmative answers to all three questions in his book. Here I suggest instead that the answers should be negative. And (...)
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  19. Dismissing Subliminal Perception Because of its Famous Problems is Classic “Baby with the Bathwater”.Matthew Finkbeiner & Max Coltheart - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (1):27.
  20. Anosognosia and the Two-Factor Theory of Delusions.Martin Davies, Anne Aimola Davies & Max Coltheart - 2005 - Mind and Language 20 (2):241-57.
    Anosognosia is literally ‘unawareness of or failure to acknowledge one’s hemi- plegia or other disability’ (OED). Etymology would suggest the meaning ‘lack of knowledge of disease’ so that anosognosia would include any denial of impairment, such as denial of blindness (Anton’s syndrome). But Babinski, who introduced the term in 1914, applied it only to patients with hemiplegia who fail to acknowledge their paralysis. Most commonly, this is failure to acknowledge paralysis of the left side of the body following damage to (...)
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  21.  1
    Models of Reading Aloud: Dual-Route and Parallel-Distributed-Processing Approaches.Max Coltheart, Brent Curtis, Paul Atkins & Micheal Haller - 1993 - Psychological Review 100 (4):589-608.
  22.  68
    Understanding Minds and Understanding Communicated Meanings in Schizophrenia.Robyn Langdon, Martin Davies & Max Coltheart - 2002 - Mind and Language 17 (1-2):68-104.
    Cognitive neuropsychology is that branch of cognitive psychology that investi- gates people with acquired or developmental disorders of cognition. The aim is to learn more about how cognitive systems normally operate or about how they are normally acquired by studying selective patterns of cognitive break- down after brain damage or selective dif?culties in acquiring particular cogni- tive abilities. In the early days of modern cognitive neuropsychology, research focused on rather basic cognitive abilities such as speech comprehension or production at the (...)
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  23.  6
    Ecological Necessity of Iconic Memory.Max Coltheart - 1983 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (1):17.
  24.  9
    A Laboratory Analogue of Mirrored-Self Misidentification Delusion: The Role of Hypnosis, Suggestion, and Demand Characteristics.Michael H. Connors, Amanda J. Barnier, Robyn Langdon, Rochelle E. Cox, Vince Polito & Max Coltheart - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (4):1510-1522.
    Mirrored-self misidentification is the delusional belief that one's own reflection in the mirror is a stranger. In two experiments, we tested the ability of hypnotic suggestion to model this condition. In Experiment 1, we compared two suggestions based on either the delusion's surface features (seeing a stranger in the mirror) or underlying processes (impaired face processing). Fifty-two high hypnotisable participants received one of these suggestions either with hypnosis or without in a wake control. In Experiment 2, we examined the extent (...)
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  25.  5
    Visual Perspective-Taking and Schizotypy: Evidence for a Simulation-Based Account of Mentalizing in Normal Adults.Robyn Langdon & Max Coltheart - 2001 - Cognition 82 (1):1-26.
  26.  73
    Pathologies of Belief.Max Coltheart & Martin Davies (eds.) - 1991 - Blackwell.
    In this book, psychologists and philosophers describe and discuss a range of case studies of delusional beliefs, drawing out general lessons both for the cognitive architecture of the mind and for the notion of rationality, and exploring connections between the delusional beliefs that occur in schizophrenia and the flawed understanding of beliefs that is characteristic of autism.
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  27.  17
    Are There Universals of Reading? We Don't Believe So.Max Coltheart & Stephen Crain - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (5):282-283.
    There are universals of language; but is it also true, as the target article claims, that there are universals of reading? We believe there are no such universals, and invite others to refute our claim by providing a list of some universals of reading. If there are no universals of reading, there cannot be a universal model of reading.
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  28.  2
    Computational Modeling of Reading in Semantic Dementia: Comment on Woollams, Lambon Ralph, Plaut, and Patterson.Max Coltheart, Jeremy J. Tree & Steven J. Saunders - 2010 - Psychological Review 117 (1):256-271.
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  29.  7
    Confabulation and Delusion.Max Coltheart & Martha Turner - 2009 - In William Hirstein (ed.), Confabulation: Views From Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Psychology and Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 173.
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  30.  33
    Paying Attention to Reading Errors in Acquired Dyslexia.Colin J. Davis & Max Coltheart - 2002 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (9):359-361.
  31.  9
    Does Reading Develop in a Sequence of Stages?Morag Stuart & Max Coltheart - 1988 - Cognition 30 (2):139-181.
  32.  56
    Autism, Modularity and Levels of Explanation in Cognitive Science.Max Coltheart & Robyn Langdon - 1998 - Mind and Language 13 (1):138-152.
  33.  17
    The Relationship Between Language-Processing and Visual-Processing Deficits in Developmental Dyslexia.Laurie Cestnick & Max Coltheart - 1999 - Cognition 71 (3):231-255.
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  34.  91
    Inference and Explanation in Cognitive Neuropsychology.Max Coltheart & Martin Davies - 2003 - Cortex 39 (1):188-191.
    The question posed by Dunn and Kirsner (D&K) is an instance of a more general one: What can we infer from data? One answer, if we are talking about logically valid deductive inference, is that we cannot infer theories from data. A theory is supposed to explain the data and so cannot be a mere summary of the data to be explained. The truth of an explanatory theory goes beyond the data and so is never logically guaranteed by the data. (...)
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  35.  5
    Cognitive Neuropsychology.Max Coltheart - 2002 - In J. Wixted & H. Pashler (eds.), Stevens' Handbook of Experimental Psychology. Wiley.
  36.  16
    Misidentification Syndromes and Cognitive Neuropsychiatry.Max Coltheart, Robyn Langdon & Nora Breen - 1997 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (5):157-158.
  37.  30
    A Two-Way Window on Face Recognition.Nora Breen, Max Coltheart & Diana Caine - 2001 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (6):234-235.
  38.  5
    Delusions and Misbeliefs.Max Coltheart - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (6):517-517.
    Beliefs may be true or false, and grounded or ungrounded. McKay & Dennett (M&D) treat these properties of belief as independent. What, then, do they mean by misbelief? They state that misbeliefs are So would they consider a very well-grounded belief that is false a misbelief? And why can't beliefs that are very poorly grounded be considered delusions, even when they are true?
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  39.  3
    Implicit Memory and the Functional Architecture of Cognition.Max Coltheart - 1989 - In S. Lewandowsky, J. M. Dunn & K. Kirsner (eds.), Implicit Memory: Theoretical Issues. Lawrence Erlbaum. pp. 285--297.
  40.  4
    Case Alternation Impairs Word Identification.Max Coltheart & Roger Freeman - 1974 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 3 (2):102-104.
  41.  2
    Varieties of Developmental Dyslexia: A Comment on Bryant and Impey.Max Coltheart - 1987 - Cognition 27 (1):97-101.
  42.  4
    Right-Hemisphere Reading.Max Coltheart - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (1):67.
  43.  17
    Distinguishing Proximal From Distal Causes is Useful and Compatible with Accounts of Compensatory Processing in Developmental Disorders of Cognition.Nancy Ewald Jackson & Max Coltheart - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):758-759.
    Models of the architecture of mature cognitive systems can inform the study of normal and disordered cognitive development, if one distinguishes between proximal and distal causes of performance. The assumption of residual normality need not be made in order to apply adult models to performance early in development, because these models can be modified to reflect the results of compensatory processing.
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  44.  56
    Trains, Planes, and Brains: Attention and Consciousness.Max Coltheart - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (1):152-153.
    O'Brien & Opie believe that some mental representations are evoked by stimuli to which a person is attending, and other mental representations are evoked by stimuli to which attention was not paid. I argue that this is the classical view of consciousness; yet this is the view which they wish to challenge.
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  45.  13
    Various Ways to Understand Other Minds: Towards a Pluralistic Approach to the Explanation of Social Understanding.Anika Fiebich & Max Coltheart - 2015 - Mind and Language 30 (3):235-258.
    In this article, we propose a pluralistic approach to the explanation of social understanding that integrates literature from social psychology with the theory of mind debate. Social understanding in everyday life is achieved in various ways. As a rule of thumb we propose that individuals make use of whatever procedure is cognitively least demanding to them in a given context. Aside from theory and simulation, associations of behaviors with familiar agents play a crucial role in social understanding. This role has (...)
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  46.  19
    On the Distinction Between Monothematic and Polythematic Delusions.Max Coltheart - 2013 - Mind and Language 28 (1):103-112.
    Some delusional patients exhibit only a single delusional belief (or several delusional beliefs concerning a single theme): this is monothematic delusion. It contrasts with polythematic delusion, where the patient exhibits a variety of delusions concerning a variety of different themes. The neuropsychological bases of various monothematic delusions are rather well understood, and there is a well-worked-out general neuropsychological theory of monothematic delusion, the two-factor theory. Whether polythematic delusion might be explained in a similar way is an open question: I sketch (...)
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  47.  3
    In Defence of Dual-Route Models of Reading.Max Coltheart - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (4):709-710.
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  48.  3
    Using Hypnosis to Disrupt Face Processing: Mirrored-Self Misidentification Delusion and Different Visual Media.Michael H. Connors, Amanda J. Barnier, Max Coltheart, Robyn Langdon, Rochelle E. Cox, Davide Rivolta & Peter W. Halligan - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  49.  19
    The Role of Signal Detection and Amplification in the Induction of Emotion by Music.William Forde Thompson & Max Coltheart - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (5):597-598.
    We propose that the six mechanisms identified by Juslin & Vll (J&V) fall into two categories: signal detection and amplification. Signal detection mechanisms are unmediated and induce emotion by directly detecting emotive signals in music. Amplifiers act in conjunction with signal detection mechanisms. We also draw attention to theoretical and empirical challenges associated with the proposed mechanisms.
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  50.  7
    Introduction to Radden Symposium.Robyn Langdon & Max Coltheart - 2013 - Mind and Language 28 (1):55-56.
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