4 found
Order:
  1.  8
    Kitsch Happens. On the Kitsch Experience of Nature.Max Ryynänen - 2019 - Espes 8 (2):10-16.
    In Kitsch and Art Tomáš Kulka notes that natural landscapes cannot be called kitsch. Kitsch needs to be produced by a human being, he says. I agree with that. Experience-wise it is more complicated, though. Sometimes kitsch affects our experience of landscapes. It is not just that our overwhelming culture of images affects how we see nature, but that also sugared, sentimental and stereotypical kitsch images of nature, that we see in postcards and social media, affect our experience of e.g. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  41
    The Double Life of Jeff Koon's Made in Heaven Glass Artworks.Max Ryynanen - 2004 - Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 16 (29-30).
    This article owes a lot to Arthur C. Danto's heuristic writings about the Artworld, which have shown us, that the ontological status of works of art is, at least when we discuss some current, maybe even dominating trends in contemporary art, dependent on our more or less philosophical interpretations of them. The effects of the Dantoan atmosphere of theory and art historical consciousness are, still, decisive for just some contemporary art. Danto's interest in the philosophical side of contemporary art makes (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3.  13
    Review: Dorota Koczanowicz and Wojciech Małecki, Eds., Shusterman’s Pragmatism: Between Literature and Somaesthetics; Wojciech Małecki, Embodying Pragmatism: Richard Shusterman’s Philosophy and Literary Theory; and Richard Shusterman, Thinking Through the Body: Essays in Somaesthetics. [REVIEW]Max Ryynänen - 2015 - Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 24 (47).
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  13
    Nobrow.Max Ryynänen - 2005 - Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 17 (32).
    Less than an attempt to philosophically define anything, the following text should be read as a theoretical sketch to portray an artistic margin, which has not yet been much discussed, although it has been loosely touched upon as a side product of many other theoretical aspirations. Its name, ‘nobrow’, is borrowed from a use somewhat different from mine, but is accurate in pointing out that there is a dynamic position works of art can acquire when they use both high and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark