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  1.  51
    When Bluff Isn't Enough.Max Wallace - 2013 - The Australian Humanist 109 (109):19.
    Wallace, Max I respond here to David Nicholls November 2012 Facebook posting in response to my article 'Non-religious tax avoidance' in the Summer issue of AH, No. 108, 2012 where I reviewed how it was the Atheist Foundation of Australia came to have tax-exempt status and whether that was appropriate.
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  2.  26
    High Court Case: Williams V the Commonwealth.Max Wallace - 2012 - The Australian Humanist 107 (107):5.
    Wallace, Max On 20 June 2012 the High Court of Australia handed down their decision in Willliams v The Commonwealth. The case concerned the question of whether it was unconstitutional for the federal government to fund religious chaplains in public schools. The argument against the funding was on technical, financial grounds. The government had avoided making a law in the parliament to fund the chaplains. That way, they were able to avoid a legal complaint that the funding breached Australia's s.116, (...)
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  3.  24
    Non-Religious Tax Avoidance.Max Wallace - 2012 - The Australian Humanist 108 (108):9.
    Wallace, Max At the Atheist Foundation of Australia (AFA) Convention in Melbourne on 14 April this year Geoffrey Robertson QC turned his mind to the tax-exempt status of religion. He joked that, Atheist foundations could qualify for tax exemption by declaring their belief in Christopher Hitchens! Turn him into an L. Ron Hubbard figure to be worshipped through his sacred books! It got a good laugh. It never occurred to Robertson, or the Convention audience, that the AFA, like all religions (...)
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  4.  15
    The Terminal Decline of Christianity in New Zealand.Max Wallace - 2014 - Australian Humanist, The 114:16.
    Wallace, Max The results of the 2013 New Zealand Census has Christianity down to around 47 per cent. Retired scientist Ken Perrott's accompanying graph charts Christianity's decline in every recent census and projects its decline to just above 20 per cent by 2030, and further beyond that date.1 It is, of course, very unlikely to disappear altogether, but, equally, the chances of a major Christian revival in New Zealand are very remote.
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  5.  12
    Finding Separation of Church and State for New Zealand.Max Wallace & Wallace - 2013 - The Australian Humanist 112:7.
    Wallace, Max; Wallace, Meg On 31 July this year submissions closed to the government's Constitutional Advisory Panel concerning a constitution for New Zealand. New Zealand, like England, does not have a written constitution. On 13 July there was a day-long seminar sponsored by the Law Faculty at Victoria University in Wellington on the question of separation of church and state. One reason for this seminar was the lack of constitutional separation in New Zealand.
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  6.  7
    Religion's Dying Swan Act: Secularism is Banishing It From the Public Square.Max Wallace - 2017 - Australian Humanist, The 125:7.
    Wallace, Max It is an often-heard claim, expressed in newspaper articles, academia, and on-line public forums, that religion is being banished from the public square.
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  7.  10
    A Secular Chronology, Part I - 1215 to 1970.Max Wallace - 2015 - Australian Humanist, The 119:14.
    Wallace, Max 1215 - Magna Carta raises the principle of equality through a 'fair trial for all', leading to the notion of the rule of law. 1517 - Martin Luther posts a document on the front door of the Catholic Church in Wittenberg, Germany. It contains 95 theses attacking church indulgences. Luther later spreads his ideas through the newly invented printing press. It is the start of the Reformation.
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  8.  9
    Australia and New Zealand Are Soft Theocracies.Max Wallace - 2014 - Australian Humanist, The 113:11.
    Wallace, Max In trying to find an accurate way to describe the relationship between government and religion, I devised the term 'soft theocracy' and defined it as a 'state where church and government purposes coincide to garnishee taxpayers' money and resources, structurally through tax exemptions and functionally through grants and privileges'.
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  9.  6
    Framing New Zealand's Funding of Religious Schools.Max Wallace - 2015 - Australian Humanist, The 117:19.
    Wallace, Max Eorge Lakoff is a professor of cognitive science and linguistics at the University of California. In his best-seller, Don't Think Of An Elephant! he demonstrates how the art of 'framing' - posing an argument in seemingly impartial terms, such as 'tax relief' - is often a method for advancing a political cause by stealth. The cause can be for the left or the right.
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  10.  5
    A Secular Chronology Part II 1971-2015.Max Wallace - 2016 - Australian Humanist, The 120:8.
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  11. Rich Enough? Do Church Schools Need Government Money?Max Wallace - 2013 - The Australian Humanist 111 (111):7.
    Wallace, Max This paper poses a paradox: the post-Gonski situation appears uncertain for mainly low socio-economic status government schools as the apparent government- in-waiting, the Coalition, have made a number of ominous statements as to whether they will follow through on the Gillard government's embrace of the Gonski funding reform.
     
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  12.  3
    Fiji: Case Study of a Paradox.Max Wallace - 2014 - Australian Humanist, The 115:16.
    Wallace, Max On 10 April 2009 all the judges in Fiji were removed from office by the military led by Commodore Voreqe Bainimarama. The Constitution was treated as if it were a mere piece of paper. This major event was a consequence of the December 2006 military coup, one of four since 1987 to shock governments, diplomats, law societies, defenders of human rights and civil liberties, and non-government organisations. The military coup, described as a 'revolution' by University of Sydney constitutional (...)
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