Results for 'May Raafat'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  42
    Attitudes, Understanding, and Concerns Regarding Medical Research Amongst Egyptians: A Qualitative Pilot Study. [REVIEW]Susan S. Khalil, Henry J. Silverman, May Raafat, Samer El-Kamary & Maged El-Setouhy - 2007 - BMC Medical Ethics 8 (1):9.
    Medical research must involve the participation of human subjects. Knowledge of patients' perspectives and concerns with their involvement in research would enhance recruitment efforts, improve the informed consent process, and enhance the overall trust between patients and investigators. Several studies have examined the views of patients from Western countries. There is limited empirical research involving the perspectives of individuals from developing countries. The purpose of this study is to examine the attitudes of Egyptian individuals toward medical research. Such information would (...)
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  2.  48
    Herding in Humans.Ramsey M. Raafat, Nick Chater & Chris Frith - 2009 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (10):420-428.
  3.  27
    Corrigendum: Herding in Humans.Ramsey M. Raafat, Nick Chater & Chris Frith - 2009 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (12):504.
  4. Corrigendum: Herding in Humans:[Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (2009), 420-428].Ramsey M. Raafat, Nick Chater & Chris Frith - 2009 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (12):504.
  5. What We May Demand of Each Other.Simon Căbulea May - 2013 - Analysis 73 (3):554-563.
    In this critical notice of Gerald Gaus's The Order of Public Reason, I reject two arguments Gaus advances for the claim that social moral rules must be publicly justified.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6. LPS 215 Topics in Analytic Philosophy Spring 2006 R. May.Robert May - manuscript
    The topic of this seminar will be the notion of language as it is employed in the philosophy of language. The seminar will be divided into two parts, of somewhat unequal length. The first part will be devoted to the change in the conception of language that marked the transition from structural linguistics to generative linguistics (the so-called "Chomskian revolution"). We will approach this not only as a chapter in the philosophy of language, but also as an important chapter in (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  17
    Descartes and the Notion of a Criterion of External Reality: May Brodbeck.May Brodbeck - 1971 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 5:1-14.
    Descartes's greatest glory was to be the first to articulate, and systematically to defend, the new scientific ideal of explanation in terms of lawfulness. For the realm of matter, lawful connections replaced anthropomorphic volitions as the model of rational explanation. Descartes's use of explanation in terms of lawfulness, inspired by Galileo's beginnings in this enterprise, was vindicated by Newton's subsequent achievement. Replacement of anthropomorphic agency, by causal mechanism, as the explanatory model, was undoubtedly the most profound of the many effects (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. 12 Specifying the Central Executive May Require Complexity.Jon May - 2001 - In Jackie Andrade (ed.), Working Memory in Perspective. Psychology Press. pp. 261.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  30
    Reply to Victoria Davion's Comments on May and Strikwerda.Larry May & Robert Strikwerda - 1995 - Hypatia 10 (2):157 - 158.
  10. Linguistic Analysis and Phenomenology. Edited by Wolfe Mays and S.C. Brown. --.Wolfe Mays & Stuart C. Brown - 1972 - Bucknell University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  11.  16
    Reconsidering the Grounds for Buddhist-Christian Dialogic Communication: A Review of John D'Arcy May's "Meaning, Consensus and Dialogue in Buddhist-Christian Communication"Meaning, Consensus and Dialogue in Buddhist-Christian Communication. [REVIEW]Lauren Pfister & John D'Arcy May - 1986 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 6:121.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  21
    Ainos: Its History and Coinage 474–341 B.C. By J. M. F. May. Pp. Xvi + 288. 10 Pll., 4 Maps. London: Geoffrey Cumberlege, 1950. 25s. [REVIEW]G. K. Jenkins & J. M. F. May - 1952 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 72:158-158.
  13. The Limits of Emotion in Moral Judgment.Joshua May - 2018 - In Karen Jones & Francois Schroeter (eds.), The Many Moral Rationalisms. Oxford University Press. pp. 286-306.
    I argue that our best science supports the rationalist idea that, independent of reasoning, emotions aren’t integral to moral judgment. There’s ample evidence that ordinary moral cognition often involves conscious and unconscious reasoning about an action’s outcomes and the agent’s role in bringing them about. Emotions can aid in moral reasoning by, for example, drawing one’s attention to such information. However, there is no compelling evidence for the decidedly sentimentalist claim that mere feelings are causally necessary or sufficient for making (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  14. Regard for Reason in the Moral Mind.Joshua May - 2018 - Oxford University Press.
    The burgeoning science of ethics has produced a trend toward pessimism. Ordinary moral thought and action, we’re told, are profoundly influenced by arbitrary factors and ultimately driven by unreasoned feelings. This book counters the current orthodoxy on its own terms by carefully engaging with the empirical literature. The resulting view, optimistic rationalism, shows the pervasive role played by reason, and ultimately defuses sweeping debunking arguments in ethics. The science does suggest that moral knowledge and virtue don’t come easily. However, despite (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   30 citations  
  15.  67
    Remastering Morals with Aristotle and Confucius.May Sim - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    Aristotle and Confucius are pivotal figures in world history; nevertheless, Western and Eastern cultures have in modern times largely abandoned the insights of these masters. Remastering Morals provides a book-length scholarly comparison of the ethics of Aristotle and Confucius. May Sim's comparisons offer fresh interpretations of the central teachings of both men. More than a catalog of similarities and differences, her study brings two great traditions into dialog so that each is able to learn from the other. This is essential (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  16. The Limits of Appealing to Disgust.Joshua May - 2018 - In Nina Strohminger & Victor Kumar (eds.), The Moral Psychology of Disgust. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 151-170.
    The rhetoric of disgust is common in moral discourse and political propaganda. Some believe it's pernicious, for it convinces without evidence. But scientific research now suggests that disgust is typically an effect, not a cause, of moral judgment. At best the emotion on its own only sometimes slightly amplifies a moral belief one already has. Appeals to disgust are thus dialectically unhelpful in discourse that seeks to convince. When opponents of abortion use repulsive images to make their case, they convince (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  17.  11
    Metaheuristic Optimization of Fractional Order Incremental Conductance Maximum Power Point Tracking.Hossam Hassan Ammar, Ahmad Taher Azar, Raafat Shalaby & M. I. Mahmoud - 2019 - Complexity 2019:1-13.
    This paper seeks to improve the photovoltaic system efficiency using metaheuristic, optimized fractional order incremental conductance control. The proposed FO-INC controls the output voltage of the PV arrays to obtain maximum power point tracking. Due to its simplicity and efficiency, the incremental conductance MPPT is one of the most popular algorithms used in the PV scheme. However, owing to the nonlinearity and fractional order nature of both PV and DC-DC converters, the conventional INC algorithm provides a trade-off between monitoring velocity (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  8
    Contingent Pacifism: Revisiting Just War Theory.Larry May - 2015 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this, the first major philosophical study of contingent pacifism, Larry May offers a new account of pacifism from within the Just War tradition. Written in a non-technical style, the book features real-life examples from contemporary wars and applies a variety of approaches ranging from traditional pacifism and human rights to international law and conscientious objection. May considers a variety of thinkers and theories, including Hugo Grotius, Kant, Socrates, Seneca on restraint, Tertullian on moral purity, Erasmus's arguments against just war, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  19. Repugnance as Performance Error: The Role of Disgust in Bioethical Intuitions.Joshua May - 2016 - In Steve Clarke, Julian Savulescu, C. A. J. Coady, Alberto Giubilini & Sagar Sanyal (eds.), The Ethics of Human Enhancement: Understanding the Debate. Oxford University Press. pp. 43-57.
    An influential argument in bioethics involves appeal to disgust, calling on us to take it seriously as a moral guide (e.g. Kass, Miller, Kahan). Some argue, for example, that genetic enhancement, especially via human reproductive cloning, is repellant or grotesque. While objectors have argued that repugnance is morally irrelevant (e.g. Nussbaum, Kelly), I argue that the problem is more fundamental: it is psychologically irrelevant. Examining recent empirical data suggests that disgust’s influence on moral judgment may be like fatigue: an exogenous (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  20. May I Treat A Collective As A Mere Means.Bill Wringe - 2014 - American Philosophical Quarterly 51 (3):273-284.
    According to Kant, it is impermissible to treat humanity as a mere means. If we accept Kant's equation of humanity with rational agency, and are literalists about ascriptions of agency to collectives it appears to follow that we may not treat collectives as mere means. On most standard accounts of what it is to treat something as a means this conclusion seems highly implausible. I conclude that we are faced with a range of options. One would be to rethink the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  21.  7
    Catalog of the Islamic Coins, Glass Weights, Dies and Medals in the Egyptian National Library, Cairo.Hanna E. Kassis, Norman D. Nicol, Raafat el-Nabarawy & Jere L. Bacharach - 1985 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 105 (4):755.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  71
    Logical Form: Its Structure and Derivation.Robert May - 1985 - MIT Press.
    Chapter. 1. Logical. Form. as. a. Level. of. Linguistic. Representation. What is the relation of a sentence's syntactic form to its logical form? This issue has been of central concern in modern inquiry into the semantic properties of natural ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   120 citations  
  23.  12
    Sharing Responsibility.Larry May - 1996 - University of Chicago Press.
    Are individuals responsible for the consequences of actions taken by their community? What about their community's inaction or its attitudes? In this innovative book, Larry May departs from the traditional Western view that moral responsibility is limited to the consequences of overt individual action. Drawing on the insights of Arendt, Jaspers, and Sartre, he argues that even when individuals are not direct participants, they share responsibility for various harms perpetrated by their communities.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   49 citations  
  24. Principled Compromise and the Abortion Controversy.Simon Cabulea May - 2005 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 33 (4):317-348.
    I argue against the claim that there are principled as well as pragmatic reasons for compromise in politics, even within the context of reasonable moral disagreements such as the abortion controversy.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   37 citations  
  25. There May Be Strict Empirical Laws in Biology, After All.Mehmet Elgin - 2006 - Biology and Philosophy 21 (1):119-134.
    This paper consists of four parts. Part 1 is an introduction. Part 2 evaluates arguments for the claim that there are no strict empirical laws in biology. I argue that there are two types of arguments for this claim and they are as follows: (1) Biological properties are multiply realized and they require complex processes. For this reason, it is almost impossible to formulate strict empirical laws in biology. (2) Generalizations in biology hold contingently but laws go beyond describing contingencies, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  26.  58
    Complicity: Ethics and Law for a Collective Age.Larry May - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (3):483-486.
    Christopher Kutz has written an excellent book: part metaphysics, part ethical theory, and part legal philosophy. The aim of the book, as is clear from the title, is to examine and defend the idea of complicity, that is, the responsibility of individuals for their participation in collective harms. While there has not been a lot of philosophical work on this topic, there has been some good work, and Kutz is responsive to most of it. But basically, this book strikes out (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   76 citations  
  27.  46
    Gilles Deleuze: An Introduction.Todd May - 2005 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book offers a readable and compelling introduction to the work of one of the twentieth century's most important and elusive thinkers. Other books have tried to explain Deleuze in general terms. Todd May organizes his book around a central question at the heart of Deleuze's philosophy: how might we live? The author then goes on to explain how Deleuze offers a view of the cosmos as a living thing that provides ways of conducting our lives that we may not (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  28.  43
    [Book Review] Sharing Responsibility. [REVIEW]Larry May - 1994 - Ethics 104 (4):890-893.
    Are individuals responsible for the consequences of actions taken by their community? What about their community's inaction or its attitudes? In this innovative book, Larry May departs from the traditional Western view that moral responsibility is limited to the consequences of overt individual action. Drawing on the insights of Arendt, Jaspers, and Sartre, he argues that even when individuals are not direct participants, they share responsibility for various harms perpetrated by their communities.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   84 citations  
  29. Does Disgust Influence Moral Judgment?Joshua May - 2014 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 92 (1):125-141.
    Recent empirical research seems to show that emotions play a substantial role in moral judgment. Perhaps the most important line of support for this claim focuses on disgust. A number of philosophers and scientists argue that there is adequate evidence showing that disgust significantly influences various moral judgments. And this has been used to support or undermine a range of philosophical theories, such as sentimentalism and deontology. I argue that the existing evidence does not support such arguments. At best it (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   38 citations  
  30. Practical Interests, Relevant Alternatives, and Knowledge Attributions: An Empirical Study.Joshua May, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, Jay G. Hull & Aaron Zimmerman - 2010 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 1 (2):265–273.
    In defending his interest-relative account of knowledge in Knowledge and Practical Interests (2005), Jason Stanley relies heavily on intuitions about several bank cases. We experimentally test the empirical claims that Stanley seems to make concerning our common-sense intuitions about these bank cases. Additionally, we test the empirical claims that Jonathan Schaffer seems to make in his critique of Stanley. We argue that our data impugn what both Stanley and Schaffer claim our intuitions about such cases are. To account for these (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   70 citations  
  31.  53
    War Crimes and Just War.Larry May - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    Larry May argues that the best way to understand war crimes is as crimes against humanness rather than as violations of justice. He shows that in a deeply pluralistic world, we need to understand the rules of war as the collective responsibility of states that send their citizens into harm's way, as the embodiment of humanity, and as the chief way for soldiers to retain a sense of honour on the battlefield. Throughout, May demonstrates that the principle of humanness is (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  32. Presentists May Say Goodbye to A-Properties.Joshua Rasmussen - 2012 - Analysis 72 (2):270-276.
    Philosophers of time say that if presentism is true (i.e. if reality is comprised solely of presently existing things), then a complete description of reality must contain tensed terms, such as ‘was’, ‘presently is’ and ‘will be’. I counter this viewpoint by explaining how the presentist may de-tense our talk about times. I argue, furthermore, that, since the A-theory of time denies the success of any such de-tensing strategy, presentism is not a version of the A-theory – contrary to the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  33. The Grammar of Quantification.Robert May - 1977 - Dissertation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  34. Directed Duties.Simon Căbulea May - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (8):523-532.
    Directed duties are duties that an agent owes to some party – a party who would be wronged if the duty were violated. A ‘direction problem’ asks what it is about a duty in virtue of which it is directed towards one party, if any, rather than another. I discuss three theories of moral direction: control, demand and interest theories. Although none of these theories can be rejected out of hand, all three face serious difficulties.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  35.  29
    You May Not Reap What You Sow: How Employees’ Moral Awareness Minimizes Ethical Leadership’s Positive Impact on Workplace Deviance.Kubilay Gok, John J. Sumanth, William H. Bommer, Ozgur Demirtas, Aykut Arslan, Jared Eberhard, Ali Ihsan Ozdemir & Ahmet Yigit - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (2):257-277.
    Although a growing body of research has shown the positive impact of ethical leadership on workplace deviance, questions remain as to whether its benefits are consistent across all situations. In this investigation, we explore an important boundary condition of ethical leadership by exploring how employees’ moral awareness may lessen the need for ethical leadership. Drawing on substitutes for leadership theory, we suggest that when individuals already possess a heightened level of moral awareness, ethical leadership’s role in reducing deviant actions may (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  36. Infant Sensitivity to Distributional Information Can Affect Phonetic Discrimination.Jessica Maye, Janet F. Werker & LouAnn Gerken - 2002 - Cognition 82 (3):B101-B111.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   116 citations  
  37. Egoism, Empathy, and Self-Other Merging.Joshua May - 2011 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 49 (s1):25-39.
    [Emerging Scholar Prize Essay for Spindel Supplement] Some philosophers and psychologists have evaluated psychological egoism against recent experimental work in social psychology. Dan Batson (1991; forthcoming), in particular, argues that empathy tends to induce genuinely altruistic motives in humans. However, some argue that there are egoistic explanations of the data that remain unscathed. I focus here on some recent criticisms based on the idea of self-other merging or "oneness," primarily leveled by Robert Cialdini and his collaborators (1997). These authors argue (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  38. What in the World is Weakness of Will?Joshua May & Richard Holton - 2012 - Philosophical Studies 157 (3):341–360.
    At least since the middle of the twentieth century, philosophers have tended to identify weakness of will with akrasia—i.e. acting, or having a disposition to act, contrary to one‘s judgments about what is best for one to do. However, there has been some recent debate about whether this captures the ordinary notion of weakness of will. Richard Holton (1999, 2009) claims that it doesn’t, while Alfred Mele (2010) argues that, to a certain extent, it does. As Mele recognizes, the question (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   36 citations  
  39. The Political Thought of Jacques Rancière: Creating Equality.Todd May - 2008 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    This book examines the political perspective of French thinker and historian Jacques Rancière. Rancière argues that a democratic politics emerges out of people’s acting under the presupposition of their own equality with those better situated in the social hierarchy. Todd May examines and extends this presupposition, offering a normative framework for understanding it, placing it in the current political context, and showing how it challenges traditional political philosophy and opens up neglected political paths. He demonstrates that the presupposition of equality (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  40. When May We Kill Government Agents? In Defense of Moral Parity.Jason Brennan - 2016 - Social Philosophy and Policy 32 (2):40-61.
    :This essay argues for what may be called the parity thesis: Whenever it would be morally permissible to kill a civilian in self-defense or in defense of others against that civilian's unjust acts, it would also be permissible to kill government officials, including police officers, prison officers, generals, lawmakers, and even chief executives. I argue that in realistic circumstances, violent resistance to state injustice is permissible, even and perhaps especially in reasonably just democratic regimes. When civilians see officials about to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  41. Psychological Egoism.Joshua May - 2011 - Internet Encyclopeida of Philosophy.
    Provides an overview of the theory of psychological egoism—the thesis that we are all ultimately motivated by self-interest. Philosophical arguments for and against the view are considered as well as some empirical evidence.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  42.  9
    Collective Responsibility: Five Decades of Debate in Theoretical and Applied Ethics.Larry May & Stacey Hoffman (eds.) - 1991 - Rowman & Littlefield.
    This anthology presents recent philosophical analyses of the moral, political, and legal responsibility of groups and their members. Motivated by reflection on such events as the Holocaust, the exploding Ford Pintos, the May Lai massacre, and apartheid in South Africa, the essays consider two questions - what collective efforts could have prevented these large-scale social harms? and is some group to blame and, if so, how is blame to be apportioned? The essays in the first half consider the concept of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  43.  3
    Heidegger’s Hidden Sources. East Asian Influences on His Work.Reinhard May - 1996 - Routledge.
    _Heidegger's Hidden Sources_ documents for the first time Heidegger's remarkable debt to East Asian philosophy. In this groundbreaking study, Reinhard May shows conclusively that Martin Heidegger borrowed some of the major ideas of his philosophy - on occasion almost word for word - from German translations of Chinese Daoist and Zen Buddhist classics. The discovery of this astonishing appropriation of non-Western sources will have important consequences for future interpretations of Heidegger's work. Moreover, it shows Heidegger as a pioneer of comparative (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  44. Heidegger’s Hidden Sources. East Asian Influences on His Work.Reinhard May - 1996 - Routledge.
    _Heidegger's Hidden Sources_ documents for the first time Heidegger's remarkable debt to East Asian philosophy. In this groundbreaking study, Reinhard May shows conclusively that Martin Heidegger borrowed some of the major ideas of his philosophy - on occasion almost word for word - from German translations of Chinese Daoist and Zen Buddhist classics. The discovery of this astonishing appropriation of non-Western sources will have important consequences for future interpretations of Heidegger's work. Moreover, it shows Heidegger as a pioneer of comparative (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  45. Genocide: A Normative Account.Larry May - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    Larry May examines the normative and conceptual problems concerning the crime of genocide. Genocide arises out of the worst of horrors. Legally, however, the unique character of genocide is reduced to a technical requirement, that the perpetrator's act manifest an intention to destroy a protected group. From this definition, many puzzles arise. How are groups to be identified and why are only four groups subject to genocide? What is the harm of destroying a group and why is this harm thought (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  46. Because I Believe It’s the Right Thing to Do.Joshua May - 2013 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (4):791-808.
    Our beliefs about which actions we ought to perform clearly have an effect on what we do. But so-called “Humean” theories—holding that all motivation has its source in desire—insist on connecting such beliefs with an antecedent motive. Rationalists, on the other hand, allow normative beliefs a more independent role. I argue in favor of the rationalist view in two stages. First, I show that the Humean theory rules out some of the ways we ordinarily explain actions. This shifts the burden (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  47.  83
    Nietzsche's Ethics and His War on 'Morality'.Simon May - 1999 - Oxford University Press.
    Nietzsche famously attacked traditional morality, and propounded a controversial ethics of 'life-enhancement'. Simon May presents a radically new view of Nietzsche's thought, which is shown to be both revolutionary and conservative, and to have much to offer us today after the demise of old values and the 'death of God'.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  48. Inverse Linking.Robert May - manuscript
    In this paper, we will consider a phenomenon known as inverse linking, a term coined by May (1977) to describe the most salient readings of sentences such as “Someone from every city despises it.”.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  49.  12
    Consciousness May Still Have a Processing Role to Play.Robert Van Gulick - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):699-700.
  50. Aggression and Crimes Against Peace.Larry May - 2008 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this volume, the third in his trilogy on the philosophical and legal aspects of war and conflict, Larry May locates a normative grounding for the crime of aggression - the only one of the three crimes charged at Nuremberg that is not currently being prosecuted - that is similar to that for crimes against humanity and war crimes. He considers cases from the Nuremberg trials, philosophical debates in the Just War tradition, and more recent debates about the International Criminal (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000