Results for 'Meaghan M. O'Keefe'

137 found
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  1.  18
    "Readings in Ancient Western Philosophy," by George F. McLean, O.M.I., and Patrick J. Aspell, O.M.I.Martin D. O'Keefe - 1971 - Modern Schoolman 48 (4):420-421.
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  2.  16
    Journeys as Shared Human Experiences.Sarah Perrault & Meaghan M. O'Keefe - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (10):13-15.
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  3.  38
    Précis of O'Keefe & Nadel's The Hippocampus as a Cognitive Map.John O'Keefe & Lynn Nadel - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):487-494.
  4.  19
    “Editing” Genes: A Case Study About How Language Matters in Bioethics.Meaghan O'Keefe, Sarah Perrault, Jodi Halpern, Lisa Ikemoto & Mark Yarborough - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (12):3-10.
    Metaphors used to describe new technologies mediate public understanding of the innovations. Analyzing the linguistic, rhetorical, and affective aspects of these metaphors opens the range of issues available for bioethical scrutiny and increases public accountability. This article shows how such a multidisciplinary approach can be useful by looking at a set of texts about one issue, the use of a newly developed technique for genetic modification, CRISPRcas9.
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  5.  8
    New Metaphors for New Understandings of Genomes.Sarah Tinker Perrault & Meaghan O'Keefe - 2019 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 62 (1):1-19.
    New techniques have made genome modification cheaper, easier, and faster than before, leading to a boom in research—both “basic” research and research applied to many species, and to germlines as well as somatic cells, with especially strong interest in biomedical uses. Given the scope and potential power of this work, it is vital that people be provided with accurate information about what is being done or proposed, and why. Such information is crucial to their making good decisions both in their (...)
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  6.  8
    Review of Gaymon Bennett, Technicians of Human Dignity: Bodies, Souls, and the Making of Intrinsic Worth1. [REVIEW]Meaghan O'Keefe - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (8):1-2.
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  7.  37
    Epicurus on Freedom.Tim O'Keefe - 2005 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this book, Tim O'Keefe reconstructs the theory of freedom of the ancient Greek philosopher Epicurus (341-271/0 BCE). Epicurus' theory has attracted much interest, but our attempts to understand it have been hampered by reading it anachronistically as the discovery of the modern problem of free will and determinism. O'Keefe argues that the sort of freedom which Epicurus wanted to preserve is significantly different from the 'free will' which philosophers debate today, and that in its emphasis on rational (...)
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  8. Is Consciousness the Gateway to the Hippocampal Cognitive Map? A Speculative Essay on the Neural Basis of Mind.John O'Keefe - 1985 - In David A. Oakley (ed.), Brain and Mind. Methuen.
  9.  29
    The Cognitive Map as a Hippocampus.John O'Keefe & Lynn Nadel - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):520-533.
  10.  39
    Two Concepts of Argument.Daniel J. O'Keefe - 1992 - In William L. Benoit, Dale Hample & Pamela J. Benoit (eds.), Readings in Argumentation. Foris Publications. pp. 11--79.
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  11.  15
    Hippocampal Function: Does the Working Memory Hypothesis Work? Should We Retire the Cognitive Map Theory?John O'Keefe - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (3):339-343.
  12.  49
    Linking Visions: Feminist Bioethics, Human Rights, and the Developing World.Karen L. Baird, María Julia Bertomeu, Martha Chinouya, Donna Dickenson, Michele Harvey-Blankenship, Barbara Ann Hocking, Laura Duhan Kaplan, Jing-Bao Nie, Eileen O'Keefe, Julia Tao Lai Po-wah, Carol Quinn, Arleen L. F. Salles, K. Shanthi, Susana E. Sommer, Rosemarie Tong & Julie Zilberberg - 2004 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This collection brings together fourteen contributions by authors from around the globe. Each of the contributions engages with questions about how local and global bioethical issues are made to be comparable, in the hope of redressing basic needs and demands for justice. These works demonstrate the significant conceptual contributions that can be made through feminists' attention to debates in a range of interrelated fields, especially as they formulate appropriate responses to developments in medical technology, global economics, population shifts, and poverty.
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  13. Memory for Events and Their Spatial Context: Models and Experiments.Neil Burgess, Suzanna Becker, John A. King & John O'Keefe - 2002 - In Alan Baddeley, John Aggleton & Martin Conway (eds.), Episodic Memory: New Directions in Research. Oxford University Press.
  14.  27
    Epicurean Advice for the Modern Consumer.Tim O'Keefe - forthcoming - In Kelly Arenson (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Hellenistic Philosophy.
    Epicurus thought that the conventional values of Greek society—in particular, its celebration of luxury and wealth—often led people astray. It is by rejecting these values, reducing our desires, and leading a moderately ascetic life that we can attain happiness. But Epicurus’ message is also pertinent for those of us in modern Western culture, with an economy based on constant consumption and an advertising industry that molds us to serve that economy by enlarging our desires. This paper begins with an outline (...)
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  15.  14
    Anaxarchus on Indifference, Happiness, and Convention.Tim O'Keefe - forthcoming - In David Wolfsdorf (ed.), Ancient Greek Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    Anaxarchus accompanied Pyrrho on Alexander the Great’s expedition to India and was known as “the Happy Man” because of his impassivity and contentment. Our sources on his philosophy are limited and largely consist of anecdotes about his interactions with Pyrrho and Alexander, but they allow us to reconstruct a distinctive ethical position. It overlaps with several disparate ethical traditions but is not merely a hodge-podge; it hangs together as a unified whole. Like Pyrrho, he asserts that things are indifferent in (...)
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  16. Aristotle's 'Cosmic Nose' Argument for the Uniqueness of the World.Tim O'Keefe & Harald Thorsrud - 2003 - Apeiron 36 (4):311 - 326.
    David Furley's work on the cosmologies of classical antiquity is structured around what he calls "two pictures of the world." The first picture, defended by both Plato and Aristotle, portrays the universe, or all that there is (to pan), as identical with our particular ordered world-system. Thus, the adherents of this view claim that the universe is finite and unique. The second system, defended by Leucippus and Democritus, portrays an infinite universe within which our particular kosmos is only one of (...)
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  17. Is Epicurean Friendship Altruistic?Tim O'Keefe - 2001 - Apeiron 34 (4):269 - 305.
    Epicurus is strongly committed to psychological and ethical egoism and hedonism. However, these commitments do not square easily with many of the claims made by Epicureans about friendship: for instance, that the wise man will sometimes die for his friend, that the wise man will love his friend as much as himself, feel exactly the same toward his friend as toward himself, and exert himself as much for his friend's pleasure as for his own, and that every friendship is worth (...)
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  18.  10
    Human Rights and Wrongs: Could Health Impact Assessment Help?Eileen O'Keefe & Alex Scott-Samuel - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (4):734-738.
  19.  63
    The Cyrenaics on Pleasure, Happiness, and Future-Concern.Tim O'Keefe - 2002 - Phronesis 47 (4):395-416.
    The Cyrenaics assert that (1) particular pleasure is the highest good, and happiness is valued not for its own sake, but only for the sake of the particular pleasures that compose it; (2) we should not forego present pleasures for the sake of obtaining greater pleasure in the future. Their anti-eudaimonism and lack of future-concern do not follow from their hedonism. So why do they assert (1) and (2)? After reviewing and criticizing the proposals put forward by Annas, Irwin and (...)
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  20.  3
    Living Without Fear.Tim O'Keefe - forthcoming - In Nathan Powers & Jacob Klein (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Hellenistic Philosophy.
    Explores the role of eliminating fear in Epicurean ethics and physics, focusing on techniques to eliminate the fear of death and the fear of the gods.
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  21.  75
    Neural Representations in Human Spatial Memory.Neil Burgess & John O'Keefe - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (12):517-519.
  22.  10
    Human Rights and Wrongs: Could Health Impact Assessment Help?Eileen O'Keefe & Alex Scott-Samuel - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (4):734-738.
  23.  33
    The Sources and Scope of Cyrenaic Scepticism.Tim O'Keefe - 2015 - In Ugo Zilioli (ed.), From the Socratics to the Socratic Schools: Classical Ethics, Metaphysics and Epistemology. Routledge. pp. 99-113.
    This paper focuses on two questions: (I) why do the Cyrenaics deny that we can gain knowledge concerning "external things," and (II) how wide-ranging is this denial? On the first question, I argue that the Cyrenaics are skeptical because of their contrast between the indubitable grasp we have of own affections, versus the inaccessibility of external things that cause these affections. Furthermore, this inaccessibility is due to our cognitive and perceptual limitations--it is an epistemological doctrine rooted in their psychology--and not (...)
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  24.  69
    Does Epicurus Need the Swerve as an Archê of Collisions?Tim O'Keefe - 1996 - Phronesis 41 (3):305-317.
    The 'swerve' is not supposed to provide a temporal 'starting point' (archê) of collisions, since Epicurus thinks that there is no temporal starting-point of collisions. Instead, the swerve is supposed to provide an explanatory archê of collisions. In positing the swerve, Epicurus is responding to Aristotle's criticisms of Democritus' theory of motion.
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  25. The Epicureans on Happiness, Wealth, and the Deviant Craft of Property Management.Tim O'Keefe - 2016 - In Jennifer Baker & Mark White (eds.), Economics and the Virtues. Oxford University Press. pp. 37-52.
    The Epicureans advocate a moderately ascetic lifestyle on instrumental grounds, as the most effective means to securing tranquility. The virtuous person will reduce his desires to what is natural and necessary in order to avoid the trouble and anxiety caused by excessive desire. So much is clear from Epicurus ' general ethics. But the later Epicurean Philodemus fills in far more detail about the attitude a wise Epicurean will take toward wealth in his treatise On Property Management. This paper explores (...)
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  26. Spatial Representation.John O'Keefe - 1993 - Cambridge: Blackwell.
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  27.  39
    Socrates' Therapeutic Use of Inconsistency in the Axiochus.Tim O'Keefe - 2006 - Phronesis 51 (4):388-407.
    The few people familiar with the pseudo-Platonic dialogue Axiochus generally have a low opinion of it. It's easy to see why: the dialogue is a mish-mash of Platonic, Epicurean and Cynic arguments against the fear of death, seemingly tossed together with no regard whatsoever for their consistency. As Furley notes, the Axiochus appears to be horribly confused. Whereas in the Apology Socrates argues that death is either annihilation or a relocation of the soul, and is a blessing either way, "the (...)
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  28.  22
    Lucretius and the Philosophical Use of Literary Persuasion.Tim O'Keefe - forthcoming - In Donncha O'Rourke (ed.), Approaches to Lucretius: traditions and innovations in reading De Rerum Natura. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    The first part of this paper looks into the question of Lucretius’ philosophical sources and whether he draws almost exclusively from Epicurus himself or also from later Epicurean texts. I argue that such debates are inconclusive and likely will remain so, even if additional Epicurean texts are discovered, and that even if we were able to ascertain Lucretius’ philosophical sources, doing so would add little to our understanding of the De Rerum Natura. The second part of the paper turns to (...)
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  29. Cognitive Maps, Time and Causality.John O'keefe - 1994 - In Objectivity, Simulation and the Unity of Consciousness: Current Issues in the Philosophy of Mind. pp. 35-45.
  30. Kant and the Sea-Horse: An Essay in the Neurophilosophy of Space.John O'Keefe - 1993 - In Naomi Eilan, Rosaleen McCarthy & Bill Brewer (eds.), Spatial Representation. Cambridge: Blackwell.
  31.  55
    The Stoics on Fate and Freedom.Tim O'Keefe - 2016 - In Meghan Griffith, Neil Levy & Kevin Timpe (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Free Will. Routledge. pp. 236-246.
    Overview of the Stoic position. Looks at the roots of their determinism in their theology, their response to the 'lazy argument' that believing that all things are fated makes action pointless, their analysis of human action and how it allows actions to be 'up to us,' their rejection of the Principle of Alternate Possibilities, their rejection of anger and other negative reactive attitudes, and their contention that submission to god's will brings true freedom.
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  32.  18
    Ethnomethodology.Daniel J. O'keefe - 1979 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 9 (2):187–219.
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  33.  82
    Lucretius on the Cycle of Life and the Fear of Death.Tim O'Keefe - 2003 - Apeiron 36 (1):43 - 65.
    In De Rerum Natura III 963-971, Lucretius argues that death should not be feared because it is a necessary part of the natural cycle of life and death. This argument has received little philosophical attention, except by Martha Nussbaum, who asserts it is quite strong. However, Nussbaum's view is unsustainable, and I offer my own reading. I agree with Nussbaum that, as she construes it, the cycle of life argument is quite distinct from the better-known Epicurean arguments: not only does (...)
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  34.  14
    The Normativity of Nature in Epicurean Ethics and Politics.Tim O'Keefe - forthcoming - In Christof Rapp & Peter Adamson (eds.), State and Nature: Essays in Ancient Political Philosophy. De Gruyter.
    Appeals to nature are ubiquitous in Epicurean ethics and politics. The foundation of Epicurean ethics is its claim that pleasure is the sole intrinsic good and pain the sole intrinsic evil, and this is supposedly shown by the behavior of infants who have not yet been corrupted, " when nature's judgement is pure and whole. " Central to their recommendations about how to attain pleasure is their division between types of desires: the natural and necessary ones, the natural but non-necessary (...)
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  35. Terrorism and Justice Moral Argument in a Threatened World.C. A. J. Coady & Michael P. O'keefe - 2002
     
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  36.  73
    The Reductionist and Compatibilist Argument of Epicurus' On Nature, Book 25.Tim O'Keefe - 2002 - Phronesis 47 (2):153-186.
    Epicurus' "On Nature" 25 is the key text for anti-reductionist interpretations of Epicurus' philosophy of mind. In it, Epicurus is trying to argue against those, like Democritus, who say that everything occurs 'of necessity,' and in the course of this argument, he says many things that appear to conflict with an Identity Theory of Mind and with causal determinism. In this paper, I engage in a close reading of this text in order to show that it does not contain any (...)
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  37.  46
    Epicurus' Garden: Physics and Epistemology.Tim O'Keefe - 2013 - In Frisbee Sheffield James Warren (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Ancient Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 455-468.
    Overview of Epicurean physics and epistemology, ending with a critical discussion of Cicero's report on Epicurean theology.
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  38. Influence and Identity In Social Interaction.Barbara O'keefe - 1995 - Argumentation 9 (5):785-800.
  39.  13
    Review of Warren, The Pleasures of Reason Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic Hedonists. [REVIEW]Tim O'Keefe - 2015 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
  40.  36
    Hedonistic Theories of Well-Being in Antiquity.Tim O'Keefe - 2016 - In Guy Fletcher (ed.), Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Well-Being.
    Focuses on the theories of the Epicureans and Cyrenaics in light of Plato's and Aristotle's criticisms of hedonism. Closes with a brief discussion of how the Pyrrhonian skeptical conception of the telos compares to the Epicureans'.
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  41.  36
    The Cyrenaics Vs. The Pyrrhonists on Knowledge of Appearances.Tim O'Keefe - 2011 - In Diego E. Machuca (ed.), New Essays on Ancient Pyrrhonism. Brill. pp. 27-40.
    In Outlines of Pyrrhonism, Sextus Empiricus takes pains to differentiate the skeptical way of life from other positions with which it is often confused, and in the course of this discussion he briefly explains how skepticism differs from Cyrenaicism. Surprisingly, Sextus does not mention an important apparent difference between the two. The Cyrenaics have a positive epistemic commitment--that we can apprehend our own feelings. Although we cannot know whether the honey is really sweet, we can know infallibly that right now (...)
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  42.  12
    Identity and Influence in Social Interaction.Barbara J. O'Keefe - 1995 - Argumentation 9 (5):785-800.
    Researchers studying argumentation often make the simplifying assumption that rational persuasion can be studied independently from the processes through which social identities are established and maintained. However, developments in the study of message design, particularly the groundbreaking work of Brown and Levinson (1978, 1987) on politeness, suggests that in practice the multiple functions of messages are intertwined in message structure and effects. In contrast to the view that identity issues distort rational processes in communication, both the communication of identity and (...)
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  43. Brill Online Books and Journals.Gail Fine, Francisco J. Gonzalez, Verity Harte, Tim O'Keefe, Tad Brennan, T. H. Irwin & Bob Sharples - 1996 - Phronesis 41 (3).
  44. Comments on Julia Annas, Platonic Ethics, Old and New.Tim O'Keefe - manuscript
    Critical examination of chapter 5 of Julia Annas' book _Platonic Ethics Old and New._ I first argue that she does not establish that Plato's ethics are independent of his metaphysics. I then suggest several ways in the content of his ethics does depend on his metaphysics, with special attention paid to the discussion of the impact of theology on ethics in the _Laws_.
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  45.  25
    Excerpt From.James McNamara & Dennis O'Keefe - 1990 - The Chesterton Review 16 (3/4):357-361.
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  46. Why There Are No Fresh Starts in Metaphysics Epsilon or Nicomachean Ethics III 5.Tim O'Keefe - manuscript
    Metaphysics Epsilon 2-3 and Nicomachean Ethics III 5 (1114b3-25) are often cited in favor of indeterminist interpretations of Aristotle. In Metaphysics Epsilon Aristotle denies that the coincidental has an aitia, and some (e.g., Sorabji) take this as a denial that coincidences have causes. In NE III 5 Aristotle says a person's actions and character must have their origin (archê) in the agent for him to be responsible for them. From this, some conclude that Aristotle thinks a person can be the (...)
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  47. Lucretius.Tim O'Keefe - 2005 - In Patricia O'Grady (ed.), Meet the Philosophers of Ancient Greece.
    Titus Lucretius Carus was an ardent disciple of Epicurus and the author of the De Rerum Natura, one of the greatest poems in Latin. Other than his approximate dates of birth and death, we have next to no reliable information about him. Because of his family name and his apparent familiarity with Roman upper-class mores, it is thought that Lucretius was probably a member of the aristocratic clan of the Lucretii, but this is not certain. And so any insight we (...)
     
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  48.  27
    Gregory J. Chaitin, the Unknowable, Springer-Verlag, Singapore 1999.Greg O'Keefe - 2002 - Studia Logica 70 (2):299-302.
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  49.  45
    Review of James Warren, Epicurus and Democritean Ethics: An Archaeology of Ataraxia[REVIEW]Tim O'Keefe - 2003 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (5).
    Epicurus’ debt to Democritus’ metaphysics is obvious. Even where Epicurus feels the need to modify Democritus’ metaphysics because of its skeptical or fatalist implications, he is working within Democritus’ general framework. The situation is quite different in ethics. Ancient critics of Epicurus claim that the Cyrenaics’ hedonism is the inspiration for his ethics, and in modern times, Epicurus’ ethics is usually viewed in the context of Aristotle’s eudaimonism.
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  50.  42
    Epicurus.Tim O'Keefe - 2001 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Overview of Epicurus' philosophy, including his metaphysics, theory of knowledge, and ethics.
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