Results for 'Meaning Generator System'

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  1.  8
    Discourse Theory’s Sociological Claim Reconstructing the Epistemic Meaning of Democracy as a Deliberative System.Daniel Gaus - 2016 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 42 (6):503-525.
    In the quest for a workable ideal of democracy, the systems approach has recently shifted its perspective on deliberative democratic theory. Instead of enquiring how institutionalized decision-making might mirror an ‘ideal deliberative procedure’, it asks how democracy might be construed as a ‘deliberative system’. This leads it to recommend de-emphasizing the role of parliament and focusing instead on non-institutionalized actors and communications. Though this increased emphasis is undoubtedly warranted, the importance of parliament must not be downplayed. In the debate (...)
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  2.  4
    How Can Meaning Be Grounded Within a Closed Self-Referential System?B. Pierce - 2016 - Constructivist Foundations 11 (3):557-559.
    Open peer commentary on the article “Consciousness as Self-Description in Differences” by Diana Gasparyan. Upshot: The account, in the target article, of consciousness as a self-contained, self-referential autopoietic system faces a potential problem when we seek to ground meaning and norms. I will discuss three ways in which meaning can be grounded, the last of which requires reasons for action to be grounded from a subjective point of view, with the qualitative character of affective valence performing a (...)
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  3.  3
    Goodbye to the School System— Goodbye to the System of Leisure and Recreation? Aspects of the Decay of the Last Dominant Mode of Socialisation at the Levels of Meaning and Identity[1].Volker Buddrus - 1984 - Educational Studies 10 (1):43-63.
    (1984). Goodbye to the School System— Goodbye to the System of Leisure and Recreation? Aspects of the decay of the last dominant mode of socialisation at the levels of meaning and identity[1] Educational Studies: Vol. 10, No. 1, pp. 43-63.
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  4.  12
    The System of Interpretance, Naturalizing Meaning as Finality.Stanley N. Salthe - 2008 - Biosemiotics 1 (3):285-294.
    A materialist construction of semiosis requires system embodiment at particular locales, in order to function as systems of interpretance. I propose that we can use a systemic model of scientific measurement to construct a systems view of semiosis. I further suggest that the categories required to understand that process can be used as templates when generalizing to biosemiosis and beyond. The viewpoint I advance here is that of natural philosophy—which, once granted, incurs no principled block to further generalization all (...)
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  5.  6
    Unpacking the Meaning of Quality in Quebec's Health-Care System: The Input of Commissions of Inquiry. [REVIEW]Oscar E. Firbank - 2008 - Health Care Analysis 16 (4):375-396.
    The paper explores how several commissions of inquiry established in Quebec, Canada, have, over time, contributed in redefining the meaning of quality in health-care and its management. Adopting an interpretive analysis of commissions’ reports, the paper examines the particular ‘conceptual boxes’ used by their members to tackle quality and the embedded nature of their work. It is shown that although quality was always considered, this was generally done by bringing into focus specific quality domains and issues, some new, others (...)
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  6. The Human Brains System Forming Capability and the Research on Ultimate Reality and Meaning.W. Gray - 1982 - Ultimate Reality and Meaning 5 (1):68-77.
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  7.  28
    The Meaning of Dharma and the Relationship of the Two Mīmāmsās: Appayya Dīksita's 'Discourse on the Refutation of a Unified Knowledge System of PūrvamīMāmsa and Uttaramimamsa. [REVIEW]Sheldon Pollock - 2004 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 32 (5-6):769-811.
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  8.  21
    Meaning-Making in the Immune System.Yair Neuman - 2004 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 47 (3):317-327.
  9.  13
    A Sensitive Period for the Incorporation of a Cultural Meaning System: A Study of Japanese Children Growing Up in the United States.Yasuko Minoura - 1992 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 20 (3):304-339.
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  10.  18
    Concordance Et Indices de la Tradition musulmaneHistoire des Croisades Et du Royaume Franc de Jérusalem. Vol. I: L'anarchie Musulmane Et la Monarchie Franque The Kingdom of the CrusadesMoslem Schisms and Sects Diwan of Khaki KhorasaniTwo Early Ismaili Treatises, I. E. Haft Babi Bab Sayyid-Na and Matlubu'l-Mu'mininTrue Meaning of Religion, I. E. Risala Dar Haqqiqati DinAl-Islām W-Al-Tajdīd Fi MiṣrMonetary and Banking System of SyriaThe Yazīdis, Past and Present. [REVIEW]Philip K. Hitti, A. J. Wensinck, René Grousset, Dana C. Munro, Abraham S. Halkin, W. Ivanow, Nasir'D.-din Tusi, Shihabu' din Shah, Ivanow, 'Abbās Maḥmūd, Sa'īd B. Ḥimādeh, Ismā'īl Beg Chol, Costi K. Zurayq, Anīs Khūri al-Maqdisi, Jibrā'īl S. Jabbūr, Al-amīr Ḥaydar al-Shihābi, Asad Rustum, Fu'ād I. al-Bustāni, Rene Grousset, 'Abbas Mahmud, Sa'id B. Himadeh, Isma'il Beg Chol, Anis Khuri al-Maqdisi, Jibra'il S. Jabbur, Al-Amir Haydar Al-Shihabi & Fu'ad I. al-Bustani - 1936 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 56 (4):510.
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  11.  6
    A Sensitive Period for the Incorporation of a Cultural Meaning System: A Study of Japanese Children Growing Up in the United States.Yasuko Minoura - 1992 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 20 (3):304-339.
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  12.  15
    Brief Notes on the Meaning of a Genomic Control System for Animal Embryogenesis.Eric Davidson - 2014 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 57 (1):78-86.
    In 2012, we published a computational automaton, based on the most comprehensive gene regulatory network (GRN) model yet available (Peter, Faure, and Davidson 2012). This model had been synthesized over the previous years from extensive experimental studies on specification mechanisms in the endomesodermal territories of the sea urchin embryo. The GRN model explicitly indicated the dynamically changing interactions occurring at the cis-regulatory control sequences of almost 50 genes, mostly encoding transcription factors (the proteins that specifically recognize cis-regulatory DNA sequence and (...)
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  13.  10
    The Religious Meaning System and Subjective Well-Being.Dariusz Krok - 2014 - Archive for the Psychology of Religion 36 (2):253-273.
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  14.  9
    System and Meaning: Comments on the Work of Niklas Luhmann.J. Bleicher - 1982 - Theory, Culture and Society 1 (1):49-52.
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  15.  3
    Language, Text, Structure, Model,(Secondary) Modeling System Are These Notions the Dynamism of Which—in the Volume of Their Meaning—Gives a Good Overview of the Semiotics of Lotman and the Tartu–Moscow Semiotic School Until the Birth of Cultural Semiotics in 1973. K. Eimermacher has Called Lotmans Ability to Conjoin Different Terms and to Provide Them with Novel Meanings Integrativity, and to This He Also Dedicated an Article “JM Lotman: Semiotic Version of Integrative Culturology”(Eimermacher 1998 ... [REVIEW]Peeter Torop - 1999 - Sign Systems Studies 27:9-23.
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  16.  2
    The Hermeneutics Rule as a System of Meaning and Production of Text.Leandro Martín Catoggio - 2012 - Estudios de Filosofía 45:105-121.
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  17. Also Psychology Consciousness, 56-59, 83-84 as Meaning, 84-85 as Ordered Symbol System, 84-85 Realist Conception of, 56-59. [REVIEW]Pragmatism Deconstruction - 1990 - In Richard A. Cherwitz (ed.), Rhetoric and Philosophy. L. Erlbaum Associates. pp. 191--309.
  18. Geometric Conventionalism and Carnap's Principle of Tolerance: We Discuss in This Paper the Question of the Scope of the Principle of Tolerance About Languages Promoted in Carnap's The Logical Syntax of Language and the Nature of the Analogy Between It and the Rudimentary Conventionalism Purportedly Exhibited in the Work of Poincaré and Hilbert. We Take It More or Less for Granted That Poincaré and Hilbert Do Argue for Conventionalism. We Begin by Sketching Coffa's Historical Account, Which Suggests That Tolerance Be Interpreted as a Conventionalism That Allows Us Complete Freedom to Select Whatever Language We Wish—an Interpretation That Generalizes the Conventionalism Promoted by Poincaré and Hilbert Which Allows Us Complete Freedom to Select Whatever Axiom System We Wish for Geometry. We Argue That Such an Interpretation Saddles Carnap with a Theory of Meaning That has Unhappy Consequences, a Theory We Believe He Did Not Hold. We Suggest That the Principle of Linguistic Tolerance In. [REVIEW]David De Vidi & Graham Solomon - 1994 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 25 (5):773-783.
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  19. Educational Handicaps as a Cultural Meaning System.Hugh Mehan - 1988 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 16 (1):73-91.
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  20. Educational Handicaps as a Cultural Meaning System.Hugh Mehan - 1988 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 16 (1):73-91.
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  21.  83
    How Is Meaning Grounded in the Organism?Liz Stillwaggon Swan & Louis J. Goldberg - 2010 - Biosemiotics 3 (2):131-146.
    In this paper we address the interrelated questions of why and how certain features of an organism’s environment become meaningful to it. We make the case that knowing the biology is essential to understanding the foundation of meaning-making in organisms. We employ Miguel Nicolelis et al’s seminal research on the mammalian somatosensory system to enrich our own concept of brain-objects as the neurobiological intermediary between the environment and the consequent organismic behavior. In the final section, we explain how (...)
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  22.  21
    Semiosis in Cognitive Systems: A Neural Approach to the Problem of Meaning[REVIEW]Eliano Pessa & Graziano Terenzi - 2007 - Mind and Society 6 (2):189-209.
    This paper deals with the problem of understanding semiosis and meaning in cognitive systems. To this aim we argue for a unified two-factor account according to which both external and internal information are non-independent aspects of meaning, thus contributing as a whole in determining its nature. To overcome the difficulties stemming from this approach we put forward a theoretical scheme based on the definition of a suitable representation space endowed with a set of transformations, and we show how (...)
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  23.  10
    The Semiosis of “Side Effects” in Genetic Interventions.Ramsey Affifi - 2016 - Biosemiotics 9 (3):345-364.
    Genetic interventions, which include transgenic engineering, gene editing, and other forms of genome modification aimed at altering the information “in” the genetic code, are rapidly increasing in power and scale. Biosemiotics offers unique tools for understanding the nature, risks, scope, and prospects of such technologies, though few in the community have turned their attention specifically in this direction. Bruni is an important exception. In this paper, I examine how we frame the concept of “side effects” that result from genetic interventions (...)
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  24.  20
    Language and the Shift From Signs to Practices in Cultural Inquiry.Richard Biernacki - 2000 - History and Theory 39 (3):289–310.
    A model of culture as a partially coherent system of signs comprised the most widely employed instrument for analyzing cultural meaning among the new cultural historians. However, the model failed to account for meanings that are produced by agents engaged in practices that are not guided by "reading" the contrasts among signs. It also encouraged some analysts to conceive the difference between sign system and concrete practice as that between what is graspable as an intellectual form and (...)
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  25.  22
    Speech and System.Peter Bornedal - 1997 - Museum Tusculanum Press.
    2.2.4) Differance as Supplement 246 2.3) Anti-logics 248 2.3.1) Argumentative Incompatibility 249 2.3.2) Counter-Finality 250 2.3.3) Performative ...
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  26.  62
    Propositions, Meaning, and Names.Tristan Grøtvedt Haze - 2018 - Philosophical Forum 49 (3):335-362.
    The object of this paper is to sketch an approach to propositions, meaning and names. The key ingredients are a Twin-Earth-inspired distinction between internal and external meaning, and a middle-Wittgenstein-inspired conception of internal meaning as role in language system. The focus here is not on working out all the details, but on outlining the approach and showing how it offers a promising solution to the problem of the meaning of proper names. This is a plea (...)
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  27.  28
    Einstein's “Zur Elektrodynamik...” (1905) Revisited, With Some Consequences.S. D. Agashe - 2006 - Foundations of Physics 36 (7):955-1011.
    Einstein, in his “Zur Elektrodynamik bewegter Körper”, gave a physical (operational) meaning to “time” of a remote event in describing “motion” by introducing the concept of “synchronous stationary clocks located at different places”. But with regard to “place” in describing motion, he assumed without analysis the concept of a system of co-ordinates.In the present paper, we propose a way of giving physical (operational) meaning to the concepts of “place” and “co-ordinate system”, and show how the observer (...)
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  28. The Meaning of Life. Can Hans Jonas’ "Philosophical Biology" Effectively Act Against Reductionism in the Contemporary Life Sciences?Roberto Franzini Tibaldeo - 2015 - Humaniora. Czasopismo Internetowe 1 (9):13-24.
    Hans Jonas’ “philosophical biology,” although developed several decades ago, is still fundamental to the contemporary reflection upon the meaning of life in a systems thinking perspective. Jonas, in fact, closely examines the reasons of modern science, and especially of Wiener’s Cybernetics and Bertalanffy’s General System Theory, and at the same time points out their basic limits, such as their having a reductionistic attitude to knowledge and ontology. In particular, the philosopher highlights the problematic consequences of scientific reductionism for (...)
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  29. A Theory of Practical Meaning.Carlotta Pavese - 2017 - Philosophical Topics 45 (2):65-96.
    This essay is divided into two parts. In the first part (§2), I introduce the idea of practical meaning by looking at a certain kind of procedural systems — the motor system — that play a central role in computational explanations of motor behavior. I argue that in order to give a satisfactory account of the content of the representations computed by motor systems (motor commands), we need to appeal to a distinctively practical kind of meaning. Defending (...)
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  30.  44
    Logicality and Meaning.Gil Sagi - 2018 - Review of Symbolic Logic 11 (1):133-159.
    In standard model-theoretic semantics, the meaning of logical terms is said to be fixed in the system while that of nonlogical terms remains variable. Much effort has been devoted to characterizing logical terms, those terms that should be fixed, but little has been said on their role in logical systems: on what fixing their meaning precisely amounts to. My proposal is that when a term is considered logical in model theory, what gets fixed is its intension rather (...)
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  31.  26
    Husserl on Meaning, Grammar, and the Structure of Content.Matteo Bianchin - 2018 - Husserl Studies 34 (2):101-121.
    Husserl’s Logical Grammar is intended to explain how complex expressions can be constructed out of simple ones so that their meaning turns out to be determined by the meanings of their constituent parts and the way they are put together. Meanings are thus understood as structured contents and classified into formal categories to the effect that the logical properties of expressions reflect their grammatical properties. As long as linguistic meaning reduces to the intentional content of pre-linguistic representations, however, (...)
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  32.  15
    On Meaning: A Biosemiotic Approach. [REVIEW]Maria Isabel Aldinhas Ferreira - 2010 - Biosemiotics 3 (1):107-130.
    A life form and its environment constitute an essential unit, a microcosm. This microcosm is sustained by a privileged dialectic relationship in which the embedded agent- an entity endowed with a particular physical architecture- and its specific environment, coupled, mutually influence each other. Identical principles rule both the basic forms of semiotic organisation and the upper forms. When we distinguish these two levels of semiotic structuring we are distinguishing the semiotic relations that involve a stimulus-response relationship, which is dyadic in (...)
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  33. Individualism, Externalism and Idiolectical Meaning.Robert Briscoe - 2006 - Synthese 152 (1):95-128.
    Semantic externalism in contemporary philosophy of language typically – and often tacitly – combines two supervenience claims about idiolectical meaning (i.e., meaning in the language system of an individual speaker). The first claim is that the meaning of a word in a speaker’s idiolect may vary without any variation in her intrinsic, physical properties. The second is that the meaning of a word in a speaker’s idiolect may vary without any variation in her understanding of (...)
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  34.  18
    Reviving the Living: Meaning Making in Living Systems.Yair Neuman - 2008 - Elsevier.
    What is reductionism? -- Who is reading the book of life? -- Genetics : from grammar to meaning making -- A point for thought : why are organisms irreducible? -- A point for thought : does the genetic system include a meta-language? -- Immunology : from soldiers to housewives -- A point for thought : immune specificity and Brancusi's kiss -- A point for thought : reflections on the immune self -- Meaning making in language and biology (...)
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  35.  54
    The Meanings of "Meaning" and "Meaning": Dimensions of the Sciences of Mind.Jay L. Garfield - 2000 - Philosophical Psychology 13 (4):421-440.
    The naturalization of intentionality requires explaining the supervenience of the normative upon the descriptive. Proper function theory provides an account of the semantics of natural representations, but not of that of signs that require the observance of norms. I therefore distinguish two senses of "meaning" and two correlative senses of "representation" and explain their relationship to one another. I distinguish between indicative signs and semiotic devices. The former are indicators of the presence of some phenomenon. The latter are rule-governed (...)
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  36. How to Be a Meaning Holist.Eric Lormand - 1996 - Journal of Philosophy 93 (2):51-73.
    Meaning holists hold, roughly, that each representation in a linguistic or mental system depends semantically on every other representation in the system. The main difficulty for holism is the threat it poses to meaning stability--shared meaning between representations in two systems. If meanings are holistically dependent, then semantic differences anywhere seem to balloon into semantic differences everywhere. My positive aim is to show how holism, even at its most extreme, can accommodate and also increase (...) stability. My negative aim is to provide reasons for rejecting various nonholist proposals, at least for systems of mental representations. (shrink)
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  37.  36
    Towards a Multi-Level Approach to the Emergence of Meaning Processes in Living Systems.João Queiroz & Charbel Niño El-Hani - 2006 - Acta Biotheoretica 54 (3):179-206.
    Any description of the emergence and evolution of different types of meaning processes (semiosis, sensu C.S.Peirce) in living systems must be supported by a theoretical framework which makes it possible to understand the nature and dynamics of such processes. Here we propose that the emergence of semiosis of different kinds can be understood as resulting from fundamental interactions in a triadically-organized hierarchical process. To grasp these interactions, we develop a model grounded on Stanley Salthe's hierarchical structuralism. This model can (...)
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  38.  16
    Representations of the Natural System in the Nineteenth Century.Robert J. O'Hara - 1991 - Biology and Philosophy 6 (2): 255–274.
    "The Natural System" is the abstract notion of the order in living diversity. The richness and complexity of this notion is revealed by the diversity of representations of the Natural System drawn by ornithologists in the Nineteenth Century. These representations varied in overall form from stars, to circles, to maps, to evolutionary trees and cross-sections through trees. They differed in their depiction of affinity, analogy, continuity, directionality, symmetry, reticulation and branching, evolution, and morphological convergence and divergence. Some representations (...)
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  39.  14
    Literal Meaning and Rabbinic Hermeneutics: A Response to Claudio Luzzati and Jan Broekman.Bernard S. Jackson - 2001 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 14 (2):129-141.
    This response to the articles of Luzzati and Broekman (in this issue) addresses principally the character of early rabbinic legal interpretation, as viewed by the Rabbis themselves. It considers, with examples, their concept of "simple meaning'' (peshat), its place within their overall hermeneutic system and its theological presuppositions. The second section responds more briefly to thetheoretical critiques of Luzzati and Broekman, stressing that (my version of) semiotics is descriptive rather than normative; resists the reduction of textual meaning (...)
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  40.  7
    Science, Religion, and the Meaning of Life and the Universe: “Amalgam” Narratives of Polish Natural Scientists.Maria Rogińska - 2016 - Zygon 51 (4):904-924.
    This article deals with phenomena occurring at the interface of the existential, the religious, and scientific inquiry. On the basis of in-depth interviews with Polish physicists and biologists, I examine the role that science and religion play in their narrative of the meaning of the Universe and human life. I show that the narratives about meaning have a system-related character that is associated with responses to adjacent metaphysical questions, including those based on scientific knowledge. I reconstruct the (...)
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  41.  6
    Through the Flat Canvas: The Motor Meaning of Realistic Paintings.Silvano Zipoli Caiani - 2016 - Aisthesis: Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 9 (2):197-217.
    It is well known that common objects in the environment can evoke possibilities of action, but what about their bi-dimensional representation? Do pictures or paintings that represent action-related objects evoke the same possibilities of actions of the objects that they represent? In contemporary cognitive science, there are two contrasting views on this issue. On the one hand, the ecological-dispositional approach to perception supports the idea that viewing depicted objects as endowed with the potential for action is nothing but an illusion. (...)
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  42.  9
    On a Distinction of Two Facets of Meaning and its Role in Proof-Theoretic Semantics.Nissim Francez - 2015 - Logica Universalis 9 (1):121-127.
    I show that in the context of proof-theoretic semantics, Dummett’s distinction between the assertoric meaning of a sentence and its ingredient sense can be seen as a distinction between two proof-theoretic meanings of a sentence: 1.Meaning as a conclusion of an introduction rule in a meaning-conferring natural-deduction proof system. 2.Meaning as a premise of an introduction rule in a meaning-conferring natural-deduction proof system. The effect of this distinction on compositionality of proof-theoretic meaning (...)
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  43. The Brain's Concepts: The Role of the Sensory-Motor System in Conceptual Knowledge.Vittorio Gallese & George Lakoff - unknown
    Concepts are the elementary units of reason and linguistic meaning. They are conventional and relatively stable. As such, they must somehow be the result of neural activity in the brain. The questions are: Where? and How? A common philosophical position is that all concepts—even concepts about action and perception—are symbolic and abstract, and therefore must be implemented outside the brain’s sensory-motor system. We will argue against this position using (1) neuroscientific evidence; (2) results from neural computation; and (3) (...)
     
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  44.  80
    The Distributed Human Neural System for Face Perception.Elizabeth A. Hoffman, M. Ida Gobbini & James V. Haxby - 2000 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (6):223-233.
    Face perception, perhaps the most highly developed visual skill in humans, is mediated by a distributed neural system in humans that is comprised of multiple, bilateral regions. We propose a model for the organization of this system that emphasizes a distinction between the representation of invariant and changeable aspects of faces. The representation of invariant aspects of faces underlies the recognition of individuals, whereas the representation of changeable aspects of faces, such as eye gaze, expression, and lip movement, (...)
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  45. General-Elimination Harmony and the Meaning of the Logical Constants.Stephen Read - 2010 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 39 (5):557-576.
    Inferentialism claims that expressions are meaningful by virtue of rules governing their use. In particular, logical expressions are autonomous if given meaning by their introduction-rules, rules specifying the grounds for assertion of propositions containing them. If the elimination-rules do no more, and no less, than is justified by the introduction-rules, the rules satisfy what Prawitz, following Lorenzen, called an inversion principle. This connection between rules leads to a general form of elimination-rule, and when the rules have this form, they (...)
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  46.  39
    How to Bootstrap a Human Communication System.Nicolas Fay, Michael Arbib & Simon Garrod - 2013 - Cognitive Science 37 (7):1356-1367.
    How might a human communication system be bootstrapped in the absence of conventional language? We argue that motivated signs play an important role (i.e., signs that are linked to meaning by structural resemblance or by natural association). An experimental study is then reported in which participants try to communicate a range of pre-specified items to a partner using repeated non-linguistic vocalization, repeated gesture, or repeated non-linguistic vocalization plus gesture (but without using their existing language system). Gesture proved (...)
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  47. Meaning Approached Via Proofs.Dag Prawitz - 2006 - Synthese 148 (3):507-524.
    According to a main idea of Gentzen the meanings of the logical constants are reflected by the introduction rules in his system of natural deduction. This idea is here understood as saying roughly that a closed argument ending with an introduction is valid provided that its immediate subarguments are valid and that other closed arguments are justified to the extent that they can be brought to introduction form. One main part of the paper is devoted to the exact development (...)
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  48.  87
    The Meaning of 'Most': Semantics, Numerosity and Psychology.Paul Pietroski, Jeffrey Lidz, Tim Hunter & Justin Halberda - 2009 - Mind and Language 24 (5):554-585.
    The meaning of 'most' can be described in many ways. We offer a framework for distinguishing semantic descriptions, interpreted as psychological hypotheses that go beyond claims about sentential truth conditions, and an experiment that tells against an attractive idea: 'most' is understood in terms of one-to-one correspondence. Adults evaluated 'Most of the dots are yellow', as true or false, on many trials in which yellow dots and blue dots were displayed for 200 ms. Displays manipulated the ease of using (...)
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  49.  58
    Deterministic Chaos and the Evolution of Meaning.Elliott O. Wagner - 2012 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 63 (3):547-575.
    Common wisdom holds that communication is impossible when messages are costless and communicators have totally opposed interests. This article demonstrates that such wisdom is false. Non-convergent dynamics can sustain partial information transfer even in a zero-sum signalling game. In particular, I investigate a signalling game in which messages are free, the state-act payoffs resemble rock–paper–scissors, and senders and receivers adjust their strategies according to the replicator dynamic. This system exhibits Hamiltonian chaos and trajectories do not converge to equilibria. This (...)
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    Dynamics of Meaning: Anaphora, Presupposition, and the Theory of Grammar.Gennaro Chierchia - 1995 - University of Chicago Press.
    In The Dynamics of Meaning , Gennaro Chierchia tackles central issues in dynamic semantics and extends the general framework. Chapter 1 introduces the notion of dynamic semantics and discusses in detail the phenomena that have been used to motivate it, such as "donkey" sentences and adverbs of quantification. The second chapter explores in greater depth the interpretation of indefinites and issues related to presuppositions of uniqueness and the "E-type strategy." In Chapter 3, Chierchia extends the dynamic approach to the (...)
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