Results for 'Medical ethics Islam'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  79
    Islam and the Four Principles of Medical Ethics.Yassar Mustafa - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (7):479-483.
    The principles underpinning Islam's ethical framework applied to routine clinical scenarios remain insufficiently understood by many clinicians, thereby unfortunately permitting the delivery of culturally insensitive healthcare. This paper summarises the foundations of the Islamic ethical theory, elucidating the principles and methodology employed by the Muslim jurist in deriving rulings in the field of medical ethics. The four-principles approach, as espoused by Beauchamp and Childress, is also interpreted through the prism of Islamic ethical theory. Each of the four (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  2.  54
    Muslim Medical Ethics: From Theory to Practice.Jonathan E. Brockopp & Thomas Eich (eds.) - 2008 - University of South Carolina Press.
    Muslim Medical Ethics draws on the work of historians, health-care professionals, theologians, and social scientists to produce an interdisciplinary view of ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  3.  24
    Medical Ethics of Medieval Islam with Special Reference to Al-Ruhāwī's Practical Ethics of the Physician. Martin Levey.Sami Hamarneh - 1969 - Speculum 44 (1):153-154.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  13
    Comparison of Medical Ethics in Islam and Secularism.Fatemeh Sefidi, Mohammad Mahdi Bandarchi & Masoomeh Seidi - 2013 - Journal of Bioethics 2 (6):93-119.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Medical Ethics in Qiṣāṣ (Eye-for-an-Eye) Punishment: An Islamic View; an Examination of Acid Throwing.Hossein Dabbagh, Amir Alishahi Tabriz & Harold G. Koenig - 2016 - Journal of Religion and Health 55 (4):1426–1432.
    Physicians in Islamic countries might be requested to participate in the Islamic legal code of qiṣāṣ, in which the victim or family has the right to an eye-for-an-eye retaliation. Qiṣāṣ is only used as a punishment in the case of murder or intentional physical injury. In situations such as throwing acid, the national legal system of some Islamic countries asks for assistance from physicians, because the punishment should be identical to the crime. The perpetrator could not be punished without a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  7
    A Comparative Study of the Foundations of Medical Ethics in Secular and Islamic Thought.Mohsen Rezaei Aderyani & Mehrzad Kiani - 2015 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 14 (40):27-46.
    The principles of medical ethics, common as they are in the world at the present time, have been formed in the context of Western secular communities; consequently, secular principles and values are inevitably manifested in all corners of medical ethics. Medical ethics is at its infancy in Iran. In order to incorporate medical ethics into the country's health system, either the same thoughts, principles, rules, and codes of Western communities should be translated (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Looking Beneath the Surface: Medical Ethics From Islamic and Western Perspectives.Hendrik M. Vroom, Petra Verdonk, Marzouk Aulad Abdellah & Martina C. Cornel (eds.) - 2013 - Editions Rodopi.
    Looking Beneath the Surface explores Arab-Islamic and Western perspectives on medical ethical issues: genetic research and treatment, abortion, organ donation, and palliative sedation and euthanasia. The contributions in this volume discuss the state of the art, the role of laws, counseling, and spiritual counseling in the decision-making process. The different approaches to the ethical issues, ways of moral reasoning, become clear in these contributions, especially the role of tradition for Islam and the importance of autonomy for the West. (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Three Things Digital Ethics Can Learn From Medical Ethics.Carissa Véliz - 2019 - Nature Electronics 2:316-318.
    Ethical codes, ethics committees, and respect for autonomy have been key to the development of medical ethics —elements that digital ethics would do well to emulate.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  58
    The Perceived Role of Islam in Immigrant Muslim Medical Practice Within the USA: An Exploratory Qualitative Study.A. I. Padela, H. Shanawani, J. Greenlaw, H. Hamid, M. Aktas & N. Chin - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (5):365-369.
    Background: Islam and Muslims are underrepresented in the medical literature and the influence of physician’s cultural beliefs and religious values upon the clinical encounter has been understudied. Objective: To elicit the perceived influence of Islam upon the practice patterns of immigrant Muslim physicians in the USA. Design: Ten face-to-face, in-depth, semistructured interviews with Muslim physicians from various backgrounds and specialties trained outside the USA and practising within the the country. Data were analysed according to the conventions of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  10.  85
    Autonomy, Problem-Based Learning, and the Teaching of Medical Ethics.M. Parker - 1995 - Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (5):305-310.
    Autonomy has been the central principle underpinning changes which have affected the practice of medicine in recent years. Medical education is undergoing changes as well, many of which are underpinned, at least implicitly, by increasing concern for autonomy. Some universities have embarked on graduate courses which utilize problem-based learning (PBL) techniques to teach all areas, including medical ethics. I argue that PBL is a desirable method for teaching and learning in medical ethics. It is desirable (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  11.  22
    Civic Republican Medical Ethics.Tom O’Shea - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (1):56-59.
    This article develops a civic republican approach to medical ethics. It outlines civic republican concerns about the domination that arises from subjection to an arbitrary power of interference, while suggesting republican remedies to such domination in healthcare. These include proposals for greater review, challenge and pre-authorisation of medical power. It extends this analysis by providing a civic republican account of assistive arbitrary power, showing how it can create similar problems within both formal and informal relationships of care, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  49
    Elective Non-Therapeutic Intensive Care and the Four Principles of Medical Ethics.A. Baumann, G. Audibert, C. G. Lafaye, L. Puybasset, P. -M. Mertes & F. Claudot - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (3):139-142.
    The chronic worldwide lack of organs for transplantation and the continuing improvement of strategies for in situ organ preservation have led to renewed interest in elective non-therapeutic ventilation of potential organ donors. Two types of situation may be eligible for elective intensive care: patients definitely evolving towards brain death and patients suitable as controlled non-heart beating organ donors after life-supporting therapies have been assessed as futile and withdrawn. Assessment of the ethical acceptability and the risks of these strategies is essential. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  13.  94
    Medical Ethics and the Islamic Tradition.Azim A. Nanji - 1988 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 13 (3):257-275.
    After tracing the main features of the foundational ethical perspectives and their relationship to the rise of medical practice in early Islam, the paper focusses on the development of the moral concept of adab . This concept served as an important tool in defining and shaping an ethical tradition based on the integration of the Hippocratic tradition into Muslim medicine and its underlying moral values. The existence of plural therapeutic systems and their moral and theological sources are also (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  14.  49
    Islamic Biomedical Ethics: Principles and Application.Abdulaziz Abdulhussein Sachedina - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    In search of principles of health care in Islam -- Health and suffering -- Beginning of life -- Terminating early life -- Death and dying -- Organ donation and cosmetic enhancement -- Recent developments -- Epilogue.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  15.  92
    Medical Ethics in the European Community.P. Riis - 1993 - Journal of Medical Ethics 19 (1):7-12.
    Increasing European co-operation must take place in many areas, including medical ethics. Against the background of common cultural norms and pluralistic variation within political traditions, religion and lifestyles, Europe will have to converge towards unity within the field of medical ethics. This article examines how such convergence might develop with respect to four major areas: European research ethics committees, democratic health systems, the human genome project and rules for stopping futile treatments.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  16.  37
    In Defence of Medical Ethics.M. H. Kottow - 1999 - Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (4):340-343.
    A number of recent publications by the philosopher David Seedhouse are discussed. Although medicine is an eminently ethical enterprise, the technical and ethical aspects of health care practices can be distinguished, therefore justifying the existence of medical ethics and its teaching as a specific part of every medical curriculum. The goal of teaching medical ethics is to make health care practitioners aware of the essential ethical aspects of their work. Furthermore, the contention that rational bioethics (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  17.  25
    What Do Islamic Institutional Fatwas Say About Medical and Research Confidentiality and Breach of Confidentiality?Ghiath Alahmad & Kris Dierickx - 2012 - Developing World Bioethics 12 (2):104-112.
    Protecting confidentiality is an essential value in all human relationships, no less in medical practice and research.1 Doctor-patient and researcher-participant relationships are built on trust and on the understanding those patients' secrets will not be disclosed.2 However, this confidentiality can be breached in some situations where it is necessary to meet a strong conflicting duty.3Confidentiality, in a general sense, has received much interest in Islamic resources including the Qur'an, Sunnah and juristic writings. However, medical and research confidentiality have (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  18. Introducing the Medical Ethics Bowl.Allison Merrick, Rochelle Green, Thomas V. Cunningham, Leah R. Eisenberg & D. Micah Hester - 2016 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 25 (1):141-149.
    Although ethics is an essential component of undergraduate medical education, research suggests current medical ethics curricula face considerable challenges in improving students’ ethical reasoning. This paper discusses these challenges and introduces a promising new mode of graduate and professional ethics instruction for overcoming them. We begin by describing common ethics curricula, focusing in particular on established problems with current approaches. Next, we describe a novel method of ethics education and assessment for medical (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19.  33
    Medical Error Disclosure: From the Therapeutic Alliance to Risk Management: The Vision of the New Italian Code of Medical Ethics.Emanuela Turillazzi & Margherita Neri - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):57.
    The Italian code of medical deontology recently approved stipulates that physicians have the duty to inform the patient of each unwanted event and its causes, and to identify, report and evaluate adverse events and errors. Thus the obligation to supply information continues to widen, in some way extending beyond the doctor-patient relationship to become an essential tool for improving the quality of professional services.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  20.  39
    Phronesis as an Ideal in Professional Medical Ethics: Some Preliminary Positionings and Problematics.Kristján Kristjánsson - 2015 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 36 (5):299-320.
    Phronesis has become a buzzword in contemporary medical ethics. Yet, the use of this single term conceals a number of significant conceptual controversies based on divergent philosophical assumptions. This paper explores three of them: on phronesis as universalist or relativist, generalist or particularist, and natural/painless or painful/ambivalent. It also reveals tensions between Alasdair MacIntyre’s take on phronesis, typically drawn upon in professional ethics discourses, and Aristotle’s original concept. The paper offers these four binaries as a possible analytical (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  21.  49
    Dual Loyalty in Military Medical Ethics: A Moral Dilemma or a Test of Integrity?Peter Olsthoorn - 2019 - Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps 165 (4):282-283.
    When militaries mention loyalty as a value they mean loyalty to colleagues and the organisation. Loyalty to principle, the type of loyalty that has a wider scope, plays hardly a role in the ethics of most armed forces. Where military codes, oaths and values are about the organisation and colleagues, medical ethics is about providing patient care impartially. Being subject to two diverging professional ethics can leave military medical personnel torn between the wish to act (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  54
    The Ethics of Postmortem Examinations in Contemporary Islam.V. Rispler-Chaim - 1993 - Journal of Medical Ethics 19 (3):164-168.
    Postmortem examinations have recently become common practice in Western medicine: they are used to verify the cause of death and to obtain additional scientific information on certain diseases, as well as to train medical students. For religious people of the monotheistic faiths postmortems present several ethical questions even though the advantages attributed to postmortems in the West are also acknowledged by Jews, Christians and Muslims. The Islamic way of dealing with such questions will be surveyed via contemporary fatawa (legal (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  23.  57
    Medical Ethics Education: A Survey of Opinion of Medical Students in a Nigerian University. [REVIEW]Clement A. Adebamowo - 2010 - Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (2):85-93.
    In Nigeria, medical education remains focused on the traditional clinical and basic medical science components, leaving students to develop moral attitudes passively through observation and intuition. In order to ascertain the adequacy of this method of moral formations, we studied the opinions of medical students in a Nigerian university towards medical ethics training. Self administered semi-structured questionnaires were completed by final year medical students of the College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria. There were (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  24.  15
    [Book Review] Just Doctoring, Medical Ethics in the Liberal State. [REVIEW]Troyen A. Brennan - 1993 - Ethics 103 (4):832-834.
    _Just Doctoring_ draws the doctor-patient relationship out of the consulting room and into the middle of the legal and political arenas where it more and more frequently appears. Traditionally, medical ethics has focused on the isolated relationship of physician to patient in a setting that has left the physician virtually untouched by market constraints or government regulation. Arguing that changes in health care institutions and legal attention to patient rights have made conventional approaches obsolete, Troyen Brennan points the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  25. Law and Medical Ethics.J. K. Mason - 2003 - Lexisnexis Uk.
    This new edition of Law and Medical Ethics continues to chart the ever-widening field that the topics cover. The interplay between the health caring professions and the public during the period intervening since the last edition has, perhaps, been mainly dominated by wide-ranging changes in the administration of the National Health Service and of the professions themselves but these have been paralleled by important developments in medical jurisprudence.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  26.  30
    Medical Ethics, Bioethics and Research Ethics Education Perspectives in South East Europe in Graduate Medical Education.Goran Mijaljica - 2014 - Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (1):237-247.
    Ethics has an established place within the medical curriculum. However notable differences exist in the programme characteristics of different schools of medicine. This paper addresses the main differences in the curricula of medical schools in South East Europe regarding education in medical ethics and bioethics, with a special emphasis on research ethics, and proposes a model curriculum which incorporates significant topics in all three fields. Teaching curricula of Medical Schools in Bulgaria, Bosnia and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  27.  50
    Essays: Religious Medical Ethics: A Study of the Rulings of Rabbi Waldenberg.Yitzhak Brand - 2010 - Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (3):495-520.
    This article seeks to examine how religious ideas that are not the focus of a particular halakhic question become the crux of the ruling, thereby molding it and dictating its bias. We will attempt to demonstrate this through a study of Jewish medical ethics, based on some of the rulings of one of the greatest halakhic decisors of the previous generation: Rabbi Eliezer Yehuda Waldenberg (1915–2006). Rabbi Waldenberg molds his rulings on the basis of a religious principle asserting (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  18
    The Seminal Contribution of Rabbi Moshe Feinstein to the Development of Modern Jewish Medical Ethics.Alan Jotkowitz - 2014 - Journal of Religious Ethics 42 (2):285-309.
    The purpose of this essay is to show how, on a wide variety of issues, Rabbi Moshe Feinstein broke new ground with the established Orthodox rabbinic consensus and blazed a new trail in Jewish medical ethics. Rabbi Feinstein took power away from the rabbis and let patients decide their treatment, he opened the door for a Jewish approach to palliative care, he supported the use of new technologies to aid in reproduction, he endorsed altruistic living organ donation and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  55
    The American Medical Ethics Revolution: How the Ama's Code of Ethics has Transformed Physicians' Relationships to Patients, Professionals, and Society.Robert Baker (ed.) - 1999 - Johns Hopkins University Press.
    The American Medical Association enacted its Code of Ethics in 1847, the first such national codification. In this volume, a distinguished group of experts from the fields of medicine, bioethics, and history of medicine reflect on the development of medical ethics in the United States, using historical analyses as a springboard for discussions of the problems of the present, including what the editors call "a sense of moral crisis precipitated by the shift from a system of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  30.  60
    A Short History of Medical Ethics.Albert R. Jonsen - 2000 - Oxford University Press.
    A physician says, "I have an ethical obligation never to cause the death of a patient," another responds, "My ethical obligation is to relieve pain even if the patient dies." The current argument over the role of physicians in assisting patients to die constantly refers to the ethical duties of the profession. References to the Hippocratic Oath are often heard. Many modern problems, from assisted suicide to accessible health care, raise questions about the traditional ethics of medicine and the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  31.  63
    Risk and Luck in Medical Ethics.Donna Dickenson - 2003 - Polity.
    This book examines the moral luck paradox, relating it to Kantian, consequentialist and virtue-based approaches to ethics. It also applies the paradox to areas in medical ethics, including allocation of scarce medical resources, informed consent to treatment, withholding life-sustaining treatment, psychiatry, reproductive ethics, genetic testing and medical research. If risk and luck are taken seriously, it might seem to follow that we cannot develop any definite moral standards, that we are doomed to moral relativism. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  32. The Need for Authenticity-Based Autonomy in Medical Ethics.Lucie White - 2018 - HEC Forum 30 (3):191-209.
    The notion of respect for autonomy dominates bioethical discussion, though what qualifies precisely as autonomous action is notoriously elusive. In recent decades, the notion of autonomy in medical contexts has often been defined in opposition to the notion of autonomy favoured by theoretical philosophers. Where many contemporary theoretical accounts of autonomy place emphasis on a condition of “authenticity”, the special relation a desire must have to the self, bioethicists often regard such a focus as irrelevant to the concerns of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  33. Classic Cases in Medical Ethics: Accounts of Cases That Have Shaped Medical Ethics, with Philosophical, Legal, and Historical Bacgrounds.Gregory E. Pence - 2004 - Mcgraw-Hill.
    This rich collection, popular among teachers and students alike, provides an in-depth look at major cases that have shaped the field of medical ethics. The book presents each famous (or infamous) case using extensive historical and contextual background, and then proceeds to illuminate it by careful discussion of pertinent philosophical theories and legal and ethical issues.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  34.  27
    The Cambridge Medical Ethics Workbook.Donna Dickenson, Richard Huxtable & Michael Parker (eds.) - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    This new edition of The Cambridge Medical Ethics Workbook builds on the success of the first edition by working from the 'bottom up', with a widely praised case ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  35.  34
    The Moral Code in Islam and Organ Donation in Western Countries: Reinterpreting Religious Scriptures to Meet Utilitarian Medical Objectives.Mohamed Y. Rady & Joseph L. Verheijde - 2014 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 9:11.
    End-of-life organ donation is controversial in Islam. The controversy stems from: scientifically flawed medical criteria of death determination; invasive perimortem procedures for preserving transplantable organs; and incomplete disclosure of information to consenting donors and families. Data from a survey of Muslims residing in Western countries have shown that the interpretation of religious scriptures and advice of faith leaders were major barriers to willingness for organ donation. Transplant advocates have proposed corrective interventions: reinterpreting religious scriptures, reeducating faith leaders, and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  36.  39
    The Ends of Human Life: Medical Ethics in a Liberal Polity.Ezekiel J. Emanuel - 1991 - Harvard University Press.
    INTRODUCTION The Questions of Medical Ethics Call him Andrew. His face is gaunt and unshaven but peaceful. His eyelids are gently closed. ...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  37. Disrupted Dialogue: Medical Ethics and the Collapse of Physician-Humanist Communication (1770-1980).Robert M. Veatch - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    Medical ethics changed dramatically in the past 30 years because physicians and humanists actively engaged each other in discussions that sometimes led to confrontation and controversy, but usually have improved the quality of medical decision-making. Before then medical ethics had been isolated for almost two centuries from the larger philosophical, social, and religious controversies of the time. There was, however, an earlier period where leaders in medicine and in the humanities worked closely together and both (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  38. Medical Ethics.Alastair V. Campbell (ed.) - 1997 - Oxford University Press.
    This book is intended as a practical introduction to the ethical problems which doctors and other health professionals can expect to encounter in their practice. It is divided into three parts: ethical foundations, clinical ethics, and medicine and society. The authors incorporate new chapters on topics such as theories of medical ethics, cultural aspects of medicine, genetic dilemmas, aging, dementia and mortality, research ethics, justice and health care (including an examination of resource allocation), and medicine, (...) and medical law. Medical Ethics also covers issues having to do with the beginning and end of life, as well as ethical questions surrounding the human body and the use of human tissue, confidentiality and AIDS, care of the mentally ill, and the implications of genetic technology. Each chapter presents a range of ethical views, drawing both from traditional philosophy and the most recent contemporary trends. The theoretical discussion is extended and illustrated by case studies and examples. This book is a non-technical guide to ethics written with the needs of medical students and medical practitioners in mind. It will also appeal to students and practitioners of allied health professions, and for all users of health care services. (shrink)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  39.  31
    Contemporary Medical Ethics: An Overview From Iran.Bagher Larijani & Farzaneh Zahedi - 2008 - Developing World Bioethics 8 (3):192-196.
    We have discussed some of the activities in the field of medical ethics that have been carried out in our country within recent years.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  40.  62
    Islamic Medical Ethics: A Primer.Aasim I. Padela - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (3):169–178.
    ABSTRACTModern medical practice is becoming increasingly pluralistic and diverse. Hence, cultural competency and awareness are given more focus in physician training seminars and within medical school curricula. A renewed interest in describing the varied ethical constructs of specific populations has taken place within medical literature. This paper aims to provide an overview of Islamic Medical Ethics. Beginning with a definition of Islamic Medical Ethics, the reader will be introduced to the scope of Islamic (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  41. Medical Ethics and Medical Law: A Symbiotic Relationship.José Miola - 2007 - Hart.
    Introduction -- Historical perspectives of medical ethics -- The medical ethics Renaissance: a brief assessment -- Risk disclosure/'informed consent' -- Consent, control and minors: Gillick and beyond -- Sterilisation/best interests: legislation intervenes -- The end of life: total abrogation -- Medical ethics in government-commissioned reports -- Conclusion.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  42.  20
    The Contribution of Kantian Moral Theory to Contemporary Medical Ethics: A Critical Analysis.Friedrich Heubel & Nikola Biller-Andorno - 2005 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8 (1):5-18.
    Kantian deontology is one of three classic moral theories, among virtue ethics and consequentialism. Issues in medical ethics are frequently addressed within a Kantian paradigm, at least – although not exclusively – in European medical ethics. At the same time, critical voices have pointed to deficits of Kantian moral philosophy which must be examined and discussed. It is argued that taking concrete situations and complex relationships into account is of paramount importance in medical (...). Encounters between medical or nursing staff and patients are rarely symmetrical relationships between autonomous and rational agents. Kantian ethics, the criticism reads, builds on the lofty ideal of such a relationship. In addition to the charge of an individualist and rationalist focus on autonomy, Kantian ethics has been accused of excluding those not actually in possession of these properties or of its rigorism. It is said to be focussed on laws and imperatives to an extent that it cannot appreciate the complex nuances of real conflicts. As a more detailed analysis will show, these charges are inadequate in at least some regards. This will be demonstrated by drawing on the Kantian notion of autonomy, the role of maxims and judgment and the conception of duties, as well as the role of emotions. Nevertheless the objections brought forward against Kantian moral theory can help determine, with greater precision, its strengths and shortcomings as an approach to current problems in medical ethics. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  43.  86
    The Medical Ethics of Miracle Max.Shea Brendan - 2015 - In R. Greene (ed.), The Princess Bride and Philosophy: Inconceivable! Chicago, IL: Open Court. pp. 193-203.
    Miracle Max, it seems, is the only remaining miracle worker in all of Florin. Among other things, this means that he (unlike anyone else) can resurrect the recently dead, at least in certain circumstances. Max’s peculiar talents come with significant perks (for example, he can basically set his own prices!), but they also raise a number of ethical dilemmas that range from the merely amusing to the truly perplexing: -/- How much about Max’s “methods” does he need to reveal to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44.  12
    Hovering Between Roles: Military Medical Ethics.Daniel Messelken & Hans U. Baer - 2013 - In Michael L. Gross & Don Carrick (eds.), Military Medical Ethics for the 21st Century. Ashgate.
  45.  21
    Devotion, Diversity, and Reasoning: Religion and Medical Ethics.Michael D. Dahnke - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (4):709-722.
    Most modern ethicists and ethics textbooks assert that religion holds little or no place in ethics, including fields of professional ethics like medical ethics. This assertion, of course, implicitly refers to ethical reasoning, but there is much more to the ethical life and the practice of ethics—especially professional ethics—than reasoning. It is no surprise that teachers of practical ethics, myself included, often focus on reasoning to the exclusion of other aspects of the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  46. Islam Und Bioethik: Eine Kritische Analyse der Modernen Diskussion Im Islamischen Recht.Thomas Eich - 2005 - Reichert.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47. The Cambridge World History of Medical Ethics.Robert B. Baker & Laurence B. McCullough (eds.) - 2008 - Cambridge University Press.
    The Cambridge World History of Medical Ethics is the first comprehensive scholarly account of the global history of medical ethics. Offering original interpretations of the field by leading bioethicists and historians of medicine, it will serve as the essential point of departure for future scholarship in the field. The volumes reconceptualize the history of medical ethics through the creation of new categories, including the life cycle; discourses of religion, philosophy, and bioethics; and the relationship (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  48. The Alleged Incompatibility of Business and Medical Ethics.Judith Andre - 1999 - HEC Forum 11 (4):288-292.
    Business Ethics and medical ethics are in principle compatible: In particular, the tools of business ethics can be useful to those doing healthcare ethics. Health care could be conducted as a business and maintain its moral core.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  35
    Case Studies in Medical Ethics.Robert M. Veatch - 1977 - Harvard University Press.
    INTRODUCTION Five Questions of Ethics Medical ethics as a field presents a fundamental problem. As a branch of applied ethics, medical ethics becomes ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  50. Islam and Bioethics.Berna Arda & Vardit Rispler-Chaim (eds.) - 2011 - Ankara Üniversitesi Basımevi.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000