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  1.  3
    Beauvoirian Androgyny: Reflections on the Androgynous World of Fraternité in The Second Sex.Megan M. Burke - 2019 - Feminist Theory 20 (1):3-18.
    This article considers Beauvoir’s gesture towards fraternité at the end of The Second Sex by focusing on her fleeting characterisation of this future as ‘an androgynous world’. Generally, either Beauvoir’s call for fraternité is dismissed as an erasure of sexual difference and is thus seen to be politically bankrupt, or fraternité is understood to realise sexual difference. This latter reading suggests that androgyny plays no role in Beauvoir’s solution to women’s oppression, while the other view often sees it as one (...)
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  2.  33
    Gender as Lived Time: Reading The Second Sex for a Feminist Phenomenology of Temporality.Megan M. Burke - 2018 - Hypatia 33 (1):111-127.
    This article suggests that Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex offers an important contribution to a feminist phenomenology of temporality. In contrast to readings of The Second Sex that focus on the notion of “becoming” as the main claim about the relation between “woman” and time, this article suggests that Beauvoir's discussion of temporality in volume II of The Second Sex shows that Beauvoir understands the temporality of waiting, or a passive present, to be an underlying structure of women's existence (...)
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    Love as a Hollow: Merleau‐Ponty's Promise of Queer Love.Megan M. Burke - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (1):54-68.
    This article argues that Maurice Merleau-Ponty advances a queer notion of love. In particular, I argue that his notion of love as an institution, as a hollow fueled by the imaginary dimension of existence, shows that love unhinges petrified ideals of gender. I suggest that the crucial insight to be found in Merleau-Ponty's account of love is that love is a lived openness that invites us to seek out new ways of being.
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    Love as a Hollow: Merleau‐Ponty's Promise of Queer Love.Megan M. Burke - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (4).
    This article argues that Maurice Merleau-Ponty advances a queer notion of love. In particular, I argue that his notion of love as an institution, as a hollow fueled by the imaginary dimension of existence, shows that love unhinges petrified ideals of gender. I suggest that the crucial insight to be found in Merleau-Ponty's account of love is that love is a lived openness that invites us to seek out new ways of being.
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    Anonymous Temporality and Gender: Rereading Merleau-Ponty.Megan M. Burke - 2013 - philoSOPHIA: A Journal of Continental Feminism 3 (2):138-157.
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