9 found
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  1.  26
    Language-experience facilitates discrimination of /d-/ in monolingual and bilingual acquisition of English.Megha Sundara, Linda Polka & Fred Genesee - 2006 - Cognition 100 (2):369-388.
  2.  16
    Lexical stress constrains English-learning infants’ segmentation in a non-native language.Megha Sundara & Victoria E. Mateu - 2018 - Cognition 181 (C):105-116.
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  3.  26
    Development of coronal stop perception: Bilingual infants keep pace with their monolingual peers.Megha Sundara, Linda Polka & Monika Molnar - 2008 - Cognition 108 (1):232-242.
  4.  23
    Biased generalization of newly learned phonological alternations by 12-month-old infants.James White & Megha Sundara - 2014 - Cognition 133 (1):85-90.
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  5.  22
    Young infants’ discrimination of subtle phonetic contrasts.Megha Sundara, Céline Ngon, Katrin Skoruppa, Naomi H. Feldman, Glenda Molina Onario, James L. Morgan & Sharon Peperkamp - 2018 - Cognition 178 (C):57-66.
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  6.  64
    Discrimination of coronal stops by bilingual adults: The timing and nature of language interaction.Megha Sundara & Linda Polka - 2008 - Cognition 106 (1):234-258.
  7.  9
    Spanish input accelerates bilingual infants' segmentation of English words.Victoria Mateu & Megha Sundara - 2022 - Cognition 218 (C):104936.
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  8.  14
    Infants' developing sensitivity to native language phonotactics: A meta-analysis.Megha Sundara, Z. L. Zhou, Canaan Breiss, Hironori Katsuda & Jeremy Steffman - 2022 - Cognition 221 (C):104993.
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  9.  32
    Stem similarity modulates infants' acquisition of phonological alternations.Megha Sundara, James White, Yun Jung Kim & Adam J. Chong - 2021 - Cognition 209 (C):104573.
    Phonemes have variant pronunciations depending on context. For instance, in American English, the [t] in pat [pæt] and the [d] in pad [pæd] are both realized with a tap [ɾ] when the –ing suffix is attached, [pæɾɪŋ]. We show that despite greater distributional and acoustic support for the [t]-tap alternation, 12-month-olds successfully relate taps to stems with a perceptually-similar final [d], not the dissimilar final-[t]. Thus, distributional learning of phonological alternations is constrained by infants' preference for the alternation of perceptually-similar (...)
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