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  1.  38
    Introduction: Sharing Data in a Medical Information Commons.Amy L. McGuire, Mary A. Majumder, Angela G. Villanueva, Jessica Bardill, Juli M. Bollinger, Eric Boerwinkle, Tania Bubela, Patricia A. Deverka, Barbara J. Evans, Nanibaa' A. Garrison, David Glazer, Melissa M. Goldstein, Henry T. Greely, Scott D. Kahn, Bartha M. Knoppers, Barbara A. Koenig, J. Mark Lambright, John E. Mattison, Christopher O'Donnell, Arti K. Rai, Laura L. Rodriguez, Tania Simoncelli, Sharon F. Terry, Adrian M. Thorogood, Michael S. Watson, John T. Wilbanks & Robert Cook-Deegan - 2019 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 47 (1):12-20.
    Drawing on a landscape analysis of existing data-sharing initiatives, in-depth interviews with expert stakeholders, and public deliberations with community advisory panels across the U.S., we describe features of the evolving medical information commons. We identify participant-centricity and trustworthiness as the most important features of an MIC and discuss the implications for those seeking to create a sustainable, useful, and widely available collection of linked resources for research and other purposes.
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  2.  10
    The Patient as Consumer: Empowerment or Commodification? Currents in Contemporary Bioethics.Melissa M. Goldstein & Daniel G. Bowers - 2015 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (1):162-165.
    Discussions surrounding patient engagement and empowerment often use the terms “patient” and “consumer” interchangeably. But do the two terms hold the same meaning, or is a “patient” a passive actor in the health care arena and a “consumer” an informed, rational decision-maker? Has there been a shift in our usage of the two terms that aligns with the increasing commercialization of health care in the U.S. or has the patient/consumer dynamic always been a part of the buying and selling of (...)
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  3.  9
    Revising the Common Rule: Ethics, Scientific Advancement, and Public Policy in Conflict.Melissa M. Goldstein - 2017 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 45 (3):452-459.
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  4.  18
    Health Information Technology and the Idea of Informed Consent.Melissa M. Goldstein - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (1):27-35.
    As policy makers place great hope in health information technology as a means to lower costs and achieve improvements in health care quality, safety, and efficiency, organizations at the forefront of building health information exchange networks attempt to weave the concept and function of informed consent into an evolving information-driven health care system. The vast amount of information that will become available to both health professionals and patients in the new HIT-driven environment can reasonably be expected to affect the relationship (...)
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  5.  23
    Health Information Technology and the Idea of Informed Consent.Melissa M. Goldstein - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (1):27-35.
    During this early stage of HIT adoption, it is critical that we engage in discussions regarding informed consent's proper role in a health care environment in which electronic information sharing holds primary importance. This article discusses current implementation of the doctrine within health information exchange networks; the relationship between informed consent and privacy; the variety of ways that the concept is referenced in discussions of information sharing; and challenges that surround incorporation of the doctrine into the evolving HIT environment. The (...)
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  6.  18
    Building an Information Technology Infrastructure.Melissa M. Goldstein & David Blumenthal - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (4):709-715.
    The widespread adoption of health information technology has been recognized as both a necessary element of health reform and a required building block of a modern, high performing health care system.
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  7.  5
    Building an Information Technology Infrastructure.Melissa M. Goldstein & David Blumenthal - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (4):709-715.
    Information technology is considered a potentially transformative element in the field of health care by payers, providers, vendors, and consumers alike. Because of this transformative potential, health information technology adoption is viewed by many as a key component of health system reform. HIT is in its earliest stages, with diffusion of the technology still relatively limited; at the same time, there is growing awareness of its potential to affect the operation of the entire health care system as a result of (...)
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  8.  8
    Guiding Deidentification Forward.Melissa M. Goldstein - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (9):27-28.
  9.  8
    Introduction.Melissa M. Goldstein & Mark A. Rothstein - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (1):6-6.
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  10.  4
    Introduction.Melissa M. Goldstein & Mark A. Rothstein - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (1):6-6.
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