Results for 'Members of the Nsight Ethics'

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  1.  26
    Sequencing Newborns: A Call for Nuanced Use of Genomic Technologies.Josephine Johnston, John D. Lantos, Aaron Goldenberg, Flavia Chen, Erik Parens, Barbara A. Koenig, Members of the Nsight Ethics & Policy Advisory Board - forthcoming - Zygon.
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  2.  4
    Members of the Code of Ethics Project Task Force.A. N. A. Staff - 2008 - In Marsha Diane Mary Fowler (ed.), Guide to the Code of Ethics for Nurses: Interpretation and Application. American Nurses Association. pp. 1998--1999.
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  3.  6
    Training Currently Practicing Members of the Ethics Consultation Service: One Institution's Experience.Rebecca L. Volpe - 2011 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 22 (3):217.
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  4.  32
    Limitation of Treatment at the End of Life: An Empirical-Ethical Analysis Regarding the Practices of Physician Members of the German Society for Palliative Medicine.Jan Schildmann, Julia Hoetzel, Anne Baumann, Christof Mueller-Busch & Jochen Vollmann - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (6):327-332.
    Objectives To determine the frequencies and types of limitation of medical treatment performed by physician members of the German Society for Palliative Medicine and to analyse the findings with respect to clinical and ethical aspects of end-of-life practices. Design Cross-sectional postal survey. Setting Data collection via the secretary of the German Society for Palliative Medicine using the German language version of the EURELD survey instrument. Subjects All 1645 physician members of the German Society for Palliative Medicine. Main outcome (...)
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  5.  30
    The Role of the Hospital Ethics Committee in Educating Members of the Medical Staff.Flora M. Barlotta & Linda S. Scheirton - 1989 - HEC Forum 1 (3):151-158.
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  6. The Views of Members of Local Research Ethics Committees, Researchers and Members of the Public Towards the Roles and Functions of LRECs.G. Kent - 1997 - Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (3):186-190.
    BACKGROUND: It can be argued that the ethical conduct of research involves achieving a balance between the rights and needs of three parties-potential research participants, society, and researchers. Local Research Ethics Committees (LRECs) have a number of roles and functions in the research enterprise, but there have been some indications that LREC members, researchers and the public can have different views about these responsibilities. Any such differences are potential sources of disagreement and misunderstanding. OBJECTIVES: To compare the views (...)
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  7.  23
    Views of the Process and Content of Ethical Reviews of Hiv Vaccine Trials Among Members of Us Institutional Review Boards and South African Research Ethics Committees.Robert Klitzman - 2008 - Developing World Bioethics 8 (3):207-218.
    ABSTRACTGiven the ethical controversies concerning HIV vaccine trials , we aimed to understand through an exploratory study how members of institutional review boards in the United States and research ethics committees in South Africa view issues concerning the process and content of reviews of these studies. We mailed packets of 20 questionnaires to 12 US IRB chairs and administrators and seven REC chairs to distribute to their members. We received 113 questionnaires . In both countries, members (...)
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  8.  27
    The Role of Patients/Family Members in the Hospital Ethics Committee's Review and Deliberations.Gregory L. Stidham, Kate T. Christensen & Gerald F. Burke - 1990 - HEC Forum 2 (1):3-17.
  9. Students' and Faculty Members' Perceptions of the Importance of Business Ethics and Accounting Ethics Education: Is There an Expectations Gap? [REVIEW]Nell Adkins & Robin R. Radtke - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 51 (3):279-300.
    Despite a wealth of prior research, little consensus has arisen about the goals and effectiveness of business ethics education. Additionally, accounting academics have recently been questioned as to their commitment to accounting ethics education. The current study examines whether accounting students' perceptions of business ethics and the goals of accounting ethics education are fundamentally different from the perceptions of accounting faculty members. The study uses a survey instrument to elicit student and faculty responses to various (...)
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  10. Ethics for Children [in Verse] Divided Into Daily Portions; as Introductory to Ethics for Youth, by a Member of the Church of England.Ethics - 1829
     
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  11. Ethics for Youth, by a Member of the Church of England.Ethics - 1828
     
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  12.  40
    Are Business Ethics and Engineering Ethics Members of the Same Family?Norman E. Bowie - 1985 - Journal of Business Ethics 4 (1):43 - 52.
    The thesis of the paper is that there are no important differences between problems in business ethics and problems in engineering ethics. The problems are both of the same logical type. What keeps this contention from being obvious is that many view engineers as professionals and business persons as nonprofessionals. If you accept the traditional definition of professional neither engineering nor business qualify. If you adopt the attitudinal definition of a profession which I propose, both practitioners could be (...)
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  13.  11
    The Lay Member in the Research Ethics Committee: A Reply to Green.C. Parker - 2007 - Research Ethics 3 (4):131-133.
    This paper seeks to clarify the process of ethical review primarily through a consideration of the lay member's role; it considers some of the conventional accounts of the role and portrays weaknesses in them. Its positive account places the ethical review service in a wide political context allowing the definition of lay member as a politically-positioned individual in the REC with the function of formally representing the public standards of morality in the medical research context.
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  14.  24
    Members First: The Ethics of Donating Organs and Tissues to Groups.Timothy F. Murphy & Robert M. Veatch - 2006 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (1):50-59.
    In the United States, people may donate organs and tissues to a family member, friend, or anyone whose specific need becomes known to them. For example, in late 2003 dozens of people came forward to donate a kidney to a professional basketball player known to them only through his sports performances. People may also donate a kidney to no one in particular through a process known as nondirected donation. In nondirected donation, people donate a kidney to the organ allocation system (...)
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  15.  51
    Doctors' and Nurses' Attitudes Towards and Experiences of Voluntary Euthanasia: Survey of Members of the Japanese Association of Palliative Medicine.Atsushi Asai, Motoki Ohnishi, Shizuko K. Nagata, Noritoshi Tanida & Yasuji Yamazaki - 2001 - Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (5):324-330.
    Objective—To demonstrate Japanese doctors' and nurses' attitudes towards and practices of voluntary euthanasia (VE) and to compare their attitudes and practices in this regard. Design—Postal survey, conducted between October and December 1999, using a self-administered questionnaire.Participants—All doctor members and nurse members of the Japanese Association of Palliative Medicine.Main outcome measure—Doctors' and nurses' attitude towards and practices of VE.Results—We received 366 completed questionnaires from 642 doctors surveyed (response rate, 58%) and 145 from 217 nurses surveyed (68%). A total of (...)
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  16. Collective Guilt. Survey of Contributions to the Subject by Members of the Ethical-Juridical Section of the I. S. S.N. Westendorp Boerma - 1949 - Synthese 8 (1):213.
     
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  17.  97
    Impact of Ethical Leadership and Leader–Member Exchange on Whistle Blowing: The Moderating Impact of the Moral Intensity of the Issue. [REVIEW]Kanika T. Bhal & Anubha Dadhich - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 103 (3):485-496.
    Given the prevalence of corporate frauds and the significance of whistle blowing as a mechanism to report about the frauds, the present study explores the impact of ethical leadership and leader–member exchange (LMX) on whistle blowing. Additionally, the article also explores the moderating role of the moral intensity [studied as magnitude of consequences (MOC)] of the issue on this relationship. The article reports results of three experimental studies conducted on the postgraduate students of a premier technology institute in India. Ethical (...)
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  18.  21
    Children and Parents as Members of the Research Team: Fair Employment Practices Without a Union Contract.Ryan Spellecy, L. Eugene Arnold & Thomas May - 2008 - Ethics and Behavior 18 (2-3):199-214.
    In clinical mental health research with children, both child and parent are essential members of the research team. The 3 R's of parent/child team membership are respect, rapport, and recognition. Respect and recognition include fair reimbursement for time, expense, and inconvenience, but the most important compensation for many families is the appreciation of the other team members for their sacrifice and cooperation. Reimbursement, although honoring the principles of justice and respect for persons, raises difficult issues about appropriate amount, (...)
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  19.  5
    An Asterisk Denotes a Publication by a Member of the American Catholic Philosophical Association. The Editors Welcome Suggestions for Reviews. Bash, Anthony. Forgiveness and Christian Ethics. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2007. Pp. Xi+ 208. Hard Cover $85.00, ISBN: 978-0-521-87880-7. Cary, Phillip. Inner Grace: Augustine in the Traditions of Plato and Paul. New York. [REVIEW]Daniel O. Dahlstrom - 2008 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82 (3).
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  20.  26
    Ann Alpers, JD, is an Assistant Professor of Medicine and Member of the Program In Medical Ethics, University of California, San Francisco. David A. Bennahum Is Professor of Medicine and Family and Community Medi-Cine, Center for Ethics, Law and the Humanities, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque. [REVIEW]David A. Buehler - 1996 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5:4-5.
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  21.  36
    Opinions About Euthanasia and Advanced Dementia: A Qualitative Study Among Dutch Physicians and Members of the General Public.Pauline S. C. Kouwenhoven, Natasja J. H. Raijmakers, Johannes J. M. van Delden, Judith A. C. Rietjens, Donald G. Van Tol, Suzanne van de Vathorst, Nienke de Graeff, Heleen A. M. Weyers, Agnes van der Heide & Ghislaine J. M. W. van Thiel - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):7.
    The Dutch law states that a physician may perform euthanasia according to a written advance euthanasia directive when a patient is incompetent as long as all legal criteria of due care are met. This may also hold for patients with advanced dementia. We investigated the differing opinions of physicians and members of the general public on the acceptability of euthanasia in patients with advanced dementia.
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  22.  11
    An Asterisk Denotes a Publication by a Member of the American Catholic Philosophical Association. The Editors Welcome Suggestions for Reviews. Bedau, Mark A., and Emily C. Parke, Eds. The Ethics of Protocells: Moral and Social Implications of Creating Life in the Laboratory. Cambridge, Mass. And London: MIT Press, 2009. Pp. X+ 368. Paper $28.00, ISBN: 978-0-262-51269-5. [REVIEW]Joseph A. Bracken, Rémi Brague, J. Budziszewski & Stratford Caldecott - 2009 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 83 (3).
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  23. NOTES: To the Members of the American Philosophical Association.A. C. Armstrong - 1923 - Ethics 34:406.
     
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  24.  48
    Response to “Members First: The Ethics of Donating Organs and Tissues to Groups” by Timothy F. Murphy and Robert M. Veatch. [REVIEW]Alexander Tabarrok & David J. Undis - 2006 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (4):450-456.
    In their paper “Members First: The Ethics of Donating Organs and Tissues to Groups,” Timothy Murphy and Robert Veatch question the ethical underpinnings of LifeSharers, a grass-roots effort to increase the supply of organs by giving organ donors preferred access to organs.
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  25.  58
    Attitudes on Euthanasia, Physician-Assisted Suicide and Terminal Sedation -- A Survey of the Members of the German Association for Palliative Medicine.H. C. Müller-Busch, Fuat S. Oduncu, Susanne Woskanjan & Eberhard Klaschik - 2005 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 7 (3):333-339.
    Background: Due to recent legislations on euthanasia and its current practice in the Netherlands and Belgium, issues of end-of-life medicine have become very vital in many European countries. In 2002, the Ethics Working Group of the German Association for Palliative Medicine has conducted a survey among its physician members in order to evaluate their attitudes towards different end-of-life medical practices, such as euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, and terminal sedation. Methods: An anonymous questionnaire was sent to the 411 DGP physicians, (...)
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  26. A Philosophical Critique of the "Best Interests" Criterion and an Exploration of Clinical Ethical Strategies for Balancing the Interests of Infants or Fetuses, Family Members, and Society in the United States, India, and Sweden.Catherine Myser - 1994 - Dissertation, Georgetown University
    Recent law and ethics literature has been inundated with recommendations of the "best interests" criterion as the appropriate guide for neonatal and maternal-fetal decision-making. Increasingly, however, its adequacy is being questioned. In Chapter 1, I survey the arguments of "best interests" defenders and critics and suggest one problem is that the "best interests" criterion has yet to be subjected to a systematic conceptual and ethical analysis. In Chapter 2, therefore, I conduct such an analysis to evaluate more systematically its (...)
     
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  27.  27
    Assessment of Physician-Assisted Death by Members of the Public Prosecution in The Netherlands.J. M. Cuperus-Bosma, G. van der Wal, C. W. Looman & P. J. van der Maas - 1999 - Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (1):8-15.
    OBJECTIVES: To identify the factors that influence the assessment of reported cases of physician-assisted death by members of the public prosecution. DESIGN/SETTING: At the beginning of 1996, during verbal interviews, 12 short case-descriptions were presented to a representative group of 47 members of the public prosecution in the Netherlands. RESULTS: Assessment varied considerably between respondents. Some respondents made more "lenient" assessments than others. Characteristics of the respondents, such as function, personal-life philosophy and age, were not related to the (...)
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  28.  3
    The 2018 Yearbook of the Digital Ethics Lab.Carl Öhman & David Watson (eds.) - 2019 - Springer Verlag.
    This book explores a wide range of topics in digital ethics. It features 11 chapters that analyze the opportunities and the ethical challenges posed by digital innovation, delineate new approaches to solve them, and offer concrete guidance to harness the potential for good of digital technologies. The contributors are all members of the Digital Ethics Lab, a research environment that draws on a wide range of academic traditions. The chapters highlight the inherently multidisciplinary nature of the subject, (...)
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  29.  10
    Lay Members of New Zealand Research Ethics Committees: Who and What Do They Represent?Helen Gremillion, Martin Tolich & Ralph Bathurst - 2015 - Research Ethics 11 (2):82-97.
    Since the 1988 Cartwright Inquiry, lay members of ethics committees have been tasked with ensuring that ordinary New Zealanders are not forgotten in ethical deliberations. Unlike Institutional Review Boards in North America, where lay members constitute a fraction of ethics committee membership, 50% of most New Zealand ethics committees are comprised of lay members. Lay roles are usually defined in very broad terms, which can vary considerably from committee to committee. This research queries who (...)
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  30.  2
    What Should Engagement in Health Research Look Like? Perspectives From People with Lived Experience, Members of the Public, and Engagement Managers.Bridget Pratt - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (2):263-274.
    Engagement in health research is increasingly practised worldwide. Yet many questions remain under debate in the ethics field about its contribution to health research and these debates have largely not been informed by those who have been engaged in health research. This paper addresses the following key questions: what should the ethical goals of engagement in health research be and how should it be performed? Qualitative data were generated by interviewing 22 people with lived experience, members of the (...)
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  31.  54
    Enriching Our Views on Clinical Ethics: Results of a Qualitative Study of the Moral Psychology of Healthcare Ethics Committee Members[REVIEW]Eric Racine - 2008 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (1):57-67.
    The contribution of healthcare ethics committee (HEC) members to HECs is fundamental. However, little is known about how HEC members view clinical ethics. We report results from a qualitative study of the moral psychology of HEC members. We found that contrary to the existing Kohlberg-based studies, HEC members hold a pragmatic non-expert view of clinical ethics based mainly on respect for persons and a commitment to the patient’s good. In general, HEC members (...)
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  32.  45
    Students as Members of University-Based Academic Research Ethics Boards: A Natural Evolution.Nancy A. Walton, Alexander G. Karabanow & Jehangir Saleh - 2008 - Journal of Academic Ethics 6 (2):117-127.
    University based academic Research Ethics Boards (REB) face the particularly difficult challenge of trying to achieve representation from a variety of disciplines, methodologies and research interests. Additionally, many are currently facing another decision – whether to have students as REB members or not. At Ryerson University, we are uniquely situated. Without a medical school in which an awareness of the research ethics review process might be grounded, our mainly social science and humanities REB must also educate and (...)
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  33.  38
    Historical Perspectives: Development of the Codes of Ethics in the Legal, Medical and Accounting Professions. [REVIEW]Jeanne F. Backof & Charles L. Martin - 1991 - Journal of Business Ethics 10 (2):99 - 110.
    Members of the legal, medical and accounting professions are guided in their professional behavior by their respective codes of ethics. These codes of ethics are not static. They are ever evolving, responding to forces that are exogenous and endogenous to the professions. Specifically, changes in the ethical codes are often due to economic and social events, governmental influence, and growth and change within the professions. This paper presents an historical analysis of the major events leading to changes (...)
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  34. The Decomposition of the Corporate Body: What Kant Cannot Contribute to Business Ethics.Matthew C. Altman - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 74 (3):253-266.
    Kant is gaining popularity in business ethics because the categorical imperative rules out actions such as deceptive advertising and exploitative working conditions, both of which treat people merely as means to an end. However, those who apply Kant in this way often hold businesses themselves morally accountable, and this conception of collective responsibility contradicts the kind of moral agency that underlies Kant's ethics. A business has neither inclinations nor the capacity to reason, so it lacks the conditions necessary (...)
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  35.  23
    The Experiences of One Faculty Member in a Business Ethics Seminar: What Can We Take Back to the Classroom? [REVIEW]Renate R. Mai-Dalton - 1987 - Journal of Business Ethics 6 (7):509 - 511.
    The author's experiences in an ethics seminar for business school faculty are described. Conclusions from the dynamics of the participants' interactions are drawn and recommendations are made for teaching business school students about ethics.
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  36.  54
    Board Members in the Service Industry: An Empirical Examination of the Relationship Between Corporate Social Responsibility Orientation and Directorial Type. [REVIEW]Nabil A. Ibrahim, Donald P. Howard & John P. Angelidis - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 47 (4):393 - 401.
    One area of business performance of particular interest to both scholars and practitioners is corporate social responsibility. The notion that organizations should be attentive to the needs of constituents other than shareholders has been investigated and vigorously debated for over two decades. This has provoked an especially rich and diverse literature investigating the relationship between business and society. As a result, researchers have urged the study of the profiles and backgrounds of corporate upper echelons in order to better understand this (...)
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  37.  36
    Engaging Communities to Strengthen Research Ethics in Low‐Income Settings: Selection and Perceptions of Members of a Network of Representatives in Coastal K Enya.Dorcas M. Kamuya, Vicki Marsh, Francis K. Kombe, P. Wenzel Geissler & Sassy C. Molyneux - 2013 - Developing World Bioethics 13 (1):10-20.
    There is wide agreement that community engagement is important for many research types and settings, often including interaction with ‘representatives’ of communities. There is relatively little published experience of community engagement in international research settings, with available information focusing on Community Advisory Boards or Groups (CAB/CAGs), or variants of these, where CAB/G members often advise researchers on behalf of the communities they represent. In this paper we describe a network of community members (‘KEMRI Community Representatives’, or ‘KCRs’) linked (...)
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  38.  7
    The Recruitment and Retention of Members of Black and Other Ethnic Minority Groups to NHS Research Ethics Committees in the United Kingdom.Babatunde A. Gbolade - 2005 - Research Ethics 1 (1):27-31.
    The publication ‘Governance arrangements for NHS Research Ethics Committees’ is clear in its recommendations about the composition of National Health Service research ethics committees in the United Kingdom. It highlights the need for a sufficiently broad range of experience and expertise, balanced age and gender distribution and every effort to be made to recruit members from black and ethnic minority backgrounds, as well as people with disabilities. It was considered that this composition would make it possible for (...)
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  39.  32
    Students' and Faculty Members' Perceptions of the Importance of Business Ethics and Accounting Ethics Education: Iranian Case. [REVIEW]Ramazanali Royaee, Saied Ali Ahmadi & Azam Jari - 2013 - Asian Journal of Business Ethics 2 (2):163-171.
    The aim of this research is to investigate students’ and faculty members’ perceptions of the importance of business ethics and accounting ethics education. The study uses a survey instrument to elicit student and faculty responses to various questions concerning the importance of business ethics and accounting ethics education. The sample consists of 75 faculty members and 108 accounting Master students and multiple regression models were used for analyzing and testing hypotheses. The results indicate that (...)
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  40.  38
    The Evaluation of the Risks and Benefits of Phase II Cancer Clinical Trials by Institutional Review Board (IRB) Members: A Case Study.H. E. M. van Luijn - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (3):170-176.
    Objectives: There are indications that institutional review board members do not find it easy to assess the risks and benefits in medical experiments, although this is their principal duty. This study examined how IRB members assessed the risk/benefit ratio of a specific phase II breast cancer clinical trial.Participants and methods: The trial was evaluated by means of a questionnaire administered to 43 members of IRBs at six academic hospitals and specialised cancer centres in the Netherlands. The questionnaire (...)
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  41.  83
    Excerpts From John Martin Fischer's Discussion with Members of the Audience.Scott MacDonald, John Martin Fischer, Carl Ginet, Joseph Margolis, Mark Case, Elie Noujain, Robert Kane & Derk Pereboom - 2000 - The Journal of Ethics 4 (4):408 - 417.
  42.  7
    Public Attitudes to Participating in UK BioBank: A DNA Bank, Lifestyle and Morbidity Database on 500,000 Members of the UK Public Aged 45–69. [REVIEW]Darren Shickle, Rhydian Hapgood, Jane Carlisle, Phil Shackley, Ann Morgan & Chris McCabe - 2003 - In Bartha Maria Knoppers (ed.), Populations and Genetics: Legal and Socio-Ethical Perspectives. Martinus Nijhoff.
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  43.  9
    The Role, Remit and Function of the Research Ethics Committee — 1. The Rationale for Ethics Review of Research by Committee.Sarah J. L. Edwards - 2009 - Research Ethics 5 (4):147-150.
    This is the first in a series of five papers on the role, remit and function of research ethics committees which are intended to provide for REC members a broad understanding of the most important issues in research ethics and governance. The first considers the rationale for having ethics review by committee at all; seeking to explain why ethics committees, as we currently have them, are so important to the wider system of governing research.
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  44.  11
    The Membership and Function of the Research Ethics Committee.Colin Parker - 2008 - Research Ethics 4 (1):31-33.
    This paper focuses on the REC and its political context to clarify the process of ethical review. The examples initially considered are taken from a Research Ethics Review editorial to develop the social explanation of the membership and function of a research ethics committee. It is suggested that the management and administration of medical matters are not always best understood solely in medical terms. The conclusion of the paper is that the larger political relationships determine the membership and (...)
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  45.  39
    An Experiential Exercise That Introduces the Concept of the Personal Ethical Threshold to Develop Moral Courage.Debra R. Comer & Gina Vega - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics Education 2 (2):171-197.
    This paper presents an experiential exercise introducing the concept of the personal ethical threshold to help explain why moral behavior does not always follow moral intention. An individual’s PET represents the individual’s vulnerability to situational factors, i.e., how little or much it takes for members of organizations to cross their proverbial line to act in a way they deem unethical. The PET reflects the interplay among the situation, the particular ethical issue, and the individual. Exploring the PET can help (...)
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  46.  17
    Out of the Clash of Hermeneutic Rules Comes Ethical Decision Making: But Does It?Johannes Iemke Bakker - 2006 - Journal of Academic Ethics 4 (1-4):11-38.
    IRBs and REBs use specialized language. A process of definition and re-definition of the situation occurs. That process of interpretation can usefully be considered from the perspective of interpretive social science models involving Symbolic Interaction, Semiotics and Hermeneutics. Seven examples are provided to flesh out the nuances of contextual decision making and the “casuistic” aspects of a balanced approach to complex problems. While many decisions are relatively unproblematic and can follow a template, it is not possible simply to apply a (...)
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  47.  19
    The Role, Remit and Function of the Research Ethics Committee — 3. Balancing Potential Social Benefits Against Risks to Subjects.Sarah J. L. Edwards - 2010 - Research Ethics 6 (3):96-100.
    This is the third in a series of five papers on the role, remit and function of research ethics committees which are intended to provide for REC members a broad understanding of the most important issues in research ethics and governance. This paper examines the role of ethics committees in balancing the social value of the research it reviews against the risks it imposes on those who take part. The ethics committee's role in assessing the (...)
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  48.  10
    Valuing Biomarker Diagnostics for Dementia Care: Enhancing the Reflection of Patients, Their Care-Givers and Members of the Wider Public.Simone van der Burg, Floris H. B. M. Schreuder, Catharina J. M. Klijn & Marcel M. Verbeek - 2019 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 22 (3):439-451.
    What is the value of an early diagnosis of dementia in the absence of effective treatment? There has been a lively scholarly debate over this question, but until now patients have not played a large role in it. Our study supplements biomedical research into innovative diagnostics with an exlporation of its meanings and values according to patients. Based on seven focusgroups with patients and their care-givers, we conclude that stakeholders evaluate early diagnostics with respect to whether and how they expect (...)
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  49. Ethics of the Legal Profession: A New Order.Fred Phillips - 2004 - Cavendish.
    In countries outside the developed world, although writers have written commentaries on specific legal codes, very little attention has been given to legal writing which has focused specifically on the ethics of the legal profession. This book makes a special contribution in that regard providing, as it does, a comparative study of prevailing efforts to enhance ethical standards in a profession potentially in crisis and under much public scrutiny. Countries which have been examined include the UK, the US, Canada, (...)
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  50.  24
    Dana Swartzberg and Pavel Tichthenko Discuss Healthcare Reforms and Human Rights in Post-Soviet Russia with a Prominent Member of the Russian Parliment.Rudolf S. Goon - 1994 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (2):277.
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