Results for 'Mental illness Philosophy.'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Mental Illness, Philosophy of.Erick Ramirez - 2014 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Philosophy of Mental Illness The Philosophy of Mental Illness is an interdisciplinary field of study that combines views and methods from the philosophy of mind, psychology, neuroscience, and moral philosophy in order to analyze the nature of mental illness. Philosophers of mental illness are concerned with examining the ontological, epistemological, and normative issues arising from […].
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Consciousness and memory.Is Mental Illness Ineradicably Normative & A. Reply To W. Miller Brown - 1986 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 7 (4):463-502.
  3.  70
    Mental Illness and Imagination in Philosophy, Literature, and Psychiatry.Line Joranger - 2013 - Philosophy and Literature 37 (2):507-523.
    Can existential themes, such as anxiety, the will to die, or our simultaneous will to live forever be logically described? Does a literary language or philosophical and psychiatric term exist that can express phenomena nonreferential to the external world? In short, does a genre exist that can redefine the relationships between symbol and meaning? Drawing upon various theoretical perspectives developed by Michel Foucault, Ludwig Binswanger, Gaston Bachelard, and Karl Jaspers, this paper discusses the ability to depict life as we are (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. The Disordered Mind: An Introduction to Philosophy of Mind and Mental Illness.George Graham - 2010 - New York City, NY: Routledge.
    _The Disordered Mind: An Introduction to Philosophy of Mind and Mental Illness, second edition_ examines and explains, from a philosophical standpoint, what mental disorder is: its reality, causes, consequences, and more. It is also an outstanding introduction to philosophy of mind from the perspective of mental disorder. Revised and updated throughout, this _second edition_ includes new discussions of grief and psychopathy, the problems of the psychophysical basis of disorder, the nature of selfhood, and clarification of the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   39 citations  
  5. Creating mental illness.Allan V. Horwitz - 2002 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
    In this surprising book, Allan V. Horwitz argues that our current conceptions of mental illness as a disease fit only a small number of serious psychological conditions and that most conditions currently regarded as mental illness are cultural constructions, normal reactions to stressful social circumstances, or simply forms of deviant behavior.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   41 citations  
  6. Mental illness and its limits.Carl Elliott - 2004 - In Jennifer Radden (ed.), The Philosophy of Psychiatry: A Companion. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 426.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  7.  13
    Mental illness and thelebensweltA discussion of Maurice Natanson (Ed.),Psychiatry and philosophy∗.Alastair Hannay - 1972 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 15 (1-4):208-230.
  8. Mental Illness, Human Function, and Values.Christopher Megone - 2000 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 7 (1):45-65.
    The present paper constitutes a development of the position that illness, whether bodily or mental, should be analyzed as an incapacitating failure of bodily or mental capacities, respectively, to realize their functions. The paper undertakes this development by responding to two critics. It addresses first Szasz’s continued claims that (1) physical illness is the paradigm concept of illness and (2) a philosophical analysis of mental illness does not shed any light on the social (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  9.  20
    The Dao of Madness: Mental Illness and Self-Cultivation in Early Chinese Philosophy and Medicine.Alexus McLeod - 2021 - Oxford University Press.
    "Chapter One lays out the dominant views of self, agency, and moral responsibility in early Chinese Philosophy. The reason for this is that these views inform the ways early Chinese thinkers approach mental illness, as well as the role they see it playing in self-cultivation as a whole. In this chapter I offer a view of a number of dominant conceptions of mind, body, and agency in early Chinese thought, through a number of philosophical and medical texts"--.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. The metaphor of mental illness.Neil Pickering - 2006 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Introduction : the existence of mental illness -- The likeness argument -- The categorical argument -- Metaphor -- Two metaphors from physical medicine -- The metaphor of mental illness -- Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, social construction, and metaphor -- Metaphors and models.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  11.  67
    Disordered existentiality: Mental illness and Heidegger’s philosophy of Dasein.Schmid Jelscha - 2018 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 17 (3):485-502.
    In this paper, I propose an existentialist-phenomenological model that conceives of mental illness through the terminology of Heidegger’s Being and Time. In particular, the concepts of existentiality, disturbance and the relation between ‘being-with’ and ‘the one’, will be implemented in order to reconstruct the experience of mental illness. The proposed model understands mental illness as a disturbance of a person’s existentiality. More precisely, mental illness is conceptualized as the disturbance of a person’s (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  12. After “Mental Illness” What? A Philosophical Endorsement of Statutory Reform.Edmund Byrne - 1980 - Bowling Green Studies in Applied Philosophy 2:122-131.
    This article argues in favor of modifying the medical model of severe psychiatric disturbances that underlies calling them "mental illness." The key reason for this proposal is that numerous specialists other than physicians as well as non-specialists contribute to the process of assisting a person recover from what the author suggests might better be called "extraordinary functional disability." There is little uniformity in existing definitions under state laws, but all involve three types of intervention: civil commitment; civil determination (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  17
    "Mental Illness" and Justice as Recognition.Sara Goering - 2009 - Philosophy & Public Policy Quarterly 29 (1/2):14.
    Disability scholars have argued that the disadvantage of disability is caused primarily by social factors and calls out for social change as a matter of justice. But what about psychiatric disability? While noting several factors that make psychiatric disability a special casethe mentally ill individuals unreliability of judgment and instability of functioningSara Goering argues that much is gained by viewing mental illness through the lens of social oppression and workingtoward recognition of individuals with mental illness as (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  14. Mental Illness Stigma and Epistemic Credibility.Abigail Gosselin - 2018 - Social Philosophy Today 34:77-94.
    In this paper I explore the way that mental illness stigma impacts epistemic credibility in people who have mental illness. While any kind of stigma has the potential to discredit a person’s epistemic agency, in the case of mental illness the basis for discrediting is in some cases and to some extent justifiable, for impairments in rationality, control, and reality perception can indeed be obstacles to participating appropriately in epistemic activities such as normal conversation (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  15.  46
    Philosophy, psychiatry, mental illness and health.Charles Morris - 1959 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 20 (1):47-55.
  16. Mental illness and the mind-brain problem: Delusion, belief and Searle's theory of intentionality.K. W. M. Fulford - 1993 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 14 (2).
    Until recently there has been little contact between the mind-brain debate in philosophy and the debate in psychiatry about the nature of mental illness. In this paper some of the analogies and disanalogies between the two debates are explored. It is noted in particular that the emphasis in modern philosophy of mind on the importance of the concept of action has been matched by a recent shift in the debate about mental illness from analyses of disease (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17.  71
    Mental Illness and Reductionism: Can Functions Be Naturalized?Tim Thornton - 2000 - Philosophy Psychiatry and Psychology 9 (1):229-253.
    There has been considerable recent philo- sophical work on the nature of mental illness. Two..
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  18.  60
    Mental illness.Christian Perring - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  19.  5
    Philosophy, Psychiatry, Mental Illness.Charles Morris - 1959 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 20:47.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20. Mental Illness and Moral Discernment: A Clinical Psychiatric Perspective.Duncan A. P. Angus & Marion L. S. Carson - 2020 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 12 (4):191-211.
    As a contribution to a wider discussion on moral discernment in theological anthropology, this paper seeks to answer the question “What is the impact of mental illness on an individual’s ability to make moral decisions?” Written from a clinical psychiatric perspective, it considers recent contributions from psychology, neuropsychology and imaging technology. It notes that the popular conception that mental illness necessarily robs an individual of moral responsibility is largely unfounded. Most people who suffer from mental (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  14
    Neuroscience and Mental Illness.Natalia Washington, Christina Leone & Laura Niemi - 2022 - In Felipe De Brigard & Walter Sinnott-Armstrong (eds.), Neuroscience and philosophy. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press.
    The fast-developing field of neuroscience has given philosophy, as well as other disciplines and the public broadly, many new tools and perspectives for investigating one of our most pressing challenges: addressing the health and well-being of our mental lives. In some cases, neuroscientific innovation has led to clearer understanding of the mechanisms of mental illness and precise new modes of treatment. In other cases, features of neuroscience itself, such as the enticing nature of the data it produces (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Re-Conceptualizing Mental "Illness": The View from Enactivist Philosophy and Cognitive Science - AISB Convention 2013.Blay Whitby & Joel Parthmore (eds.) - 2013 - AISB.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Mental illness as a moral concept.Sean Sayers - 1973 - Radical Philosophy 5:2.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  24. Mental illness as a moral concept: The relevance of Freud.S. Sayers - 1985 - In Roy Edgley & Richard Osborne (eds.), Radical philosophy reader. London: Verso. pp. 217--233.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. The myth of mental illness: foundations of a theory of personal conduct.Thomas Szasz - 1974 - New York,: Harper & Row.
    Now available in a Harper Colophon edition, this classic book has revolutionized thinking throughout the Western world about the nature of the psychiatric profession and the moral implications of its practices. Book jacket.
  26. Mental illness, agency, and responsibility.Michelle Ciurria - 2019 - In Şerife Tekin & Robyn Bluhm (eds.), The Bloomsbury Companion to Philosophy of Psychiatry. London: Bloomsbury.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  33
    To Mental Illness via a Rhyme for the Eye.T. S. Champlin - 1996 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 41:165-189.
    The intellectual journey on which I am about to embark, although not an unusual one in philosophy, may at first seem strange to those who are in the habit of looking to science for the answers to their big questions, including their philosophical questions. For I propose to shed light on the problematic relationship between two things, namely, mental illness and physical illness, by comparing their relationship to the relationship between two other things, namely, a rhyme for (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  28. Models of Mental Illness.Jacqueline Sullivan - 2016 - In Harold Kincaid, Jeremy Simon & Miriam Solomon (eds.), The Routledge Companion to the Philosophy of Medicine. Routledge. pp. 455-464.
    This chapter has two aims. The first aim is to compare and contrast three different conceptual-explanatory models for thinking about mental illness with an eye towards identifying the assumptions upon which each model is based, and exploring the model’s advantages and limitations in clinical contexts. Major Depressive Disorder is used as an example to illustrate these points. The second aim is to address the question of what conceptual-theoretical framework for thinking about mental illness is most likely (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  29.  67
    Mental Illness Stigma and Epistemic Credibility in advance.Abigail Gosselin - forthcoming - Social Philosophy Today.
  30. Commentary on Szmukler: Mental Illness, Dangerousness, and Involuntary Civil Commitment.Ken Levy & Alex Cohen - 2016 - In Daniel D. Moseley Gary J. Gala (ed.), Philosophy and Psychiatry: Problems, Intersections, and New Perspectives. Routledge. pp. 147-160.
    Prof. Cohen and I answer six questions: (1) Why do we lock people up? (2) How can involuntary civil commitment be reconciled with people's constitutional right to liberty? (3) Why don't we treat homicide as a public health threat? (4) What is the difference between legal and medical approaches to mental illness? (5) Why is mental illness required for involuntary commitment? (6) Where are we in our efforts to understand the causes of mental illness?
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Mental illness, the medical model, and psychiatry.Gerald L. Klerman - 1977 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 2 (3):220-243.
  32.  58
    Chronic mental illness and the limits of the biopsychosocial model.Dirk Richter - 1999 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (1):21-30.
    Twenty years ago, the biopsychosocial model was proposed by George Engel to be the new paradigm for medicine and psychiatry. The model assumed a hierarchical structure of the biological, psychological and social system and simple interactions between the participating systems. This article holds the thesis that the original biopsychosocial model cannot depict psychiatry's reality and problems. The clinical validity of the biopsychosocial model has to be questioned. It is argued that psychiatric interventions can only stimulate but not determine their target (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33.  54
    The reality of mental illness.Martin Roth - 1986 - New York: Cambridge University Press. Edited by Jerome Kroll.
    This book is psychiatry's reply to the diverse group of antipsychiatrists, including Laing, Foucault, Goffman, Szasz and Bassaglia, that has made fashionable the view that mental illness is merely socially deviant behaviour and that psychiatrists are agents of the capitalist society seeking to repress such behaviour. It establishes, by the use of evidence from historical and transcultural studies, that mental illness has been recognised in all cultures since the beginning of history and goes on to explore (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34. Mental illnesses are emotional disorders.Philip N. Johnson-Laird - 2021 - In Valentina Cardella & Amelia Gangemi (eds.), Psychopathology and Philosophy of Mind: What Mental Disorders Can Tell Us About Our Minds. New York, NY: Routledge.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  73
    Mental illness and moral status.Stephen Wear - 1980 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 5 (4):292-312.
  36.  19
    Mental illness and juvenile criminal justice.Kenneth Pahel - 1992 - Journal of Social Philosophy 23 (1):120-131.
  37.  45
    Should Clinicians' Views of Mental Illness Influence the DSM?Elizabeth H. Flanagan & Roger K. Blashfield - 2007 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (3):285-287.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Should Clinicians’ Views of Mental Illness Influence the DSM?Elizabeth H. Flanagan (bio) and Roger K. Blashfield (bio)Keywordsclinicians, DSM, values, psychopathology, scienceThe relationship between clinicians and the DSM is complex. Clinicians are the primary intended audience of the DSM. However, as Widiger (2007) pointed out in his commentary, there is a tension associated with trying to meet the clinical goals of the DSM and also trying to optimize (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38. What is mental illness?Derek Bolton - 2013 - In K. W. M. Fulford, Martin Davies, Richard Gipps, George Graham, John Sadler, Giovanni Stanghellini & Tim Thornton (eds.), The Oxford handbook of philosophy and psychiatry. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 434.
    The question "What is mental illness?" raises many issues in many contexts, personal, social, legal, and scientific. This chapter reviews mental health problems as they appear to the person with the problems, and to family and friends-before the person attends the clinic and is given a diagnosis-a time in which whether there really is a problem, as opposed to life's normal troubles and variations, is undecided, as also the nature of the problem, if such it be, and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  39. Malfunction and Mental Illness.Robert L. Woolfolk - 1999 - The Monist 82 (4):658-670.
    For years a debate has raged within the various literatures of philosophy, psychiatry, and psychology over whether, and to what degree, the concepts that characterize psychopathology are social constructions that reflect cultural values. While the majority position among philosophers has been normativist, i.e., that the conception of a mental disorder is value-laden, a vocal and cogent minority have argued that psychopathology results from malfunctions that can be described by terminology that is objective and scientific. Scientists and clinicians have tended (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  40.  16
    Ill Will: Or, Mental Illness and Resistant Subjectivity in Ahmed and Lugones.Katie Howard & Cash Kelly - 2022 - Journal of World Philosophies 7 (1):13-28.
    pSara Ahmed’s emWillful Subjects/em develops an account of willfulness as a site of simultaneous oppression and resistance: a diagnosis attributed to particular (not-quite-)subjects and to modes of behavior that are thereby diminished, pathologized, and controlled, and a “diagnosis” that may be positively affirmed as a way of living and doing otherwise. This essay puts Ahmed’s work on willfulness in conversation with María Lugones’ decolonial feminism, particularly her theory of active subjectivity. With Lugones, we offer, one can better understand the resistant (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  42
    Differential diagnosis and mental illness.Timothy Murphy - 1982 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 7 (4):327-336.
    In considering the argument that Thomas Szasz advances on behalf of his claim that there is no mental illness, it becomes evident that despite his stated assumptions, moral valuations are necessarily tied up with assessment of disease. By following his remarks about differential diagnosis, it becomes evident that behavior is the occasion for differential diagnosis, that behavior determines which anatomical deviations are counted as diseases, and that Szasz's insistence on autonomy introduces his own moral assumptions into the concept (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  84
    Some myths about 'mental illness'.Michael S. Moore - 1975 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 18 (3):233 – 265.
    Radical psychiatrists and others assert that mental illness is a myth. The opening and closing portions of the paper deal with the impact such argument has had in law and psychiatry. The body of the paper discusses the five versions of the myth argument prevalent in radical psychiatry: (A) that there is no such thing as mental illness; (B) that those called ?mentally ill? are really as rational as everyone else, only with different aims; that the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  43.  27
    The Rules of Insanity: Moral Responsibility and the Mentally Ill.Carl Elliott - 1996 - SUNY Press.
    In The Rules of Insanity, Carl Elliott draws on philosophy and psychiatry to develop a conceptual framework for judging the moral responsibility of mentally ill offenders. Arguing that there is little useful that can be said about the responsibility of mentally ill offenders in general, Elliott looks at specific mental illnesses in detail; among them schizophrenia, manic-depressive disorders, psychosexual disorders such as exhibitionism and voyeurism, personality disorders, and impulse control disorders such as kleptomania and pyromania. He takes a particularly (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  44. Mental health and mental illness: Some problems of definition and concept formation.Ruth Macklin - 1972 - Philosophy of Science 39 (3):341-365.
    In recent years there has been considerable discussion and controversy concerning the concepts of mental health and mental illness. The controversy has centered around the problem of providing criteria for an adequate conception of mental health and illness, as well as difficulties in specifying a clear and workable system for the classification, understanding, and treatment of psychological and emotional disorders. In this paper I shall examine a cluster of these complex and important issues, focusing on (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  45.  98
    Malfunction and Mental Illness.Brendan A. Maher, A. W. Young, Philip Gerrans, John Campbell, Kai Vogeley, Valerie Gray Hardcastle, Owen Flanagan, Robert L. Woolfolk, Barry Smith & Joëlle Proust - 1999 - The Monist 82 (4):658-670.
    For years a debate has raged within the various literatures of philosophy, psychiatry, and psychology over whether, and to what degree, the concepts that characterize psychopathology are social constructions that reflect cultural values. While the majority position among philosophers has been normativist, i.e., that the conception of a mental disorder is value-laden, a vocal and cogent minority have argued that psychopathology results from malfunctions that can be described by terminology that is objective and scientific. Scientists and clinicians have tended (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  46. Vrijednosti u psihijatriji i pojam mentalne bolesti (Eng. Values in psychiatry and the concept of mental illness).Luca Malatesti & Marko Jurjako - 2016 - In Snježana Prijić-Samaržija, Luca Malatesti & Elvio Baccarini (eds.), Moralni, Politički I Društveni Odgovori Na Društvene Devijacije (Eng. Moral, Political, and Social Responses to Antisocial Deviation). Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences in Rijeka. pp. 153-181.
    The crucial problem in the philosophy of psychiatry is to determine under which conditions certain behaviors, mental states, and personality traits should be regarded as symptoms of mental illnesses. Participants in the debate can be placed on a continuum of positions. On the one side of the continuum, there are naturalists who maintain that the concept of mental illness can be explained by relying on the conceptual apparatus of the natural sciences, such as biology and neuroscience. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  47.  17
    Agassi’s Treatment of Mental Illness: The Perspectives of Critical Rationalism and Institutional Individualism.Nathaniel Laor - 2023 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 53 (1):3-15.
    Joseph Agassi, together with Yehuda Fried, presented the paradoxes of paranoia and proposed to explain and solve them by introducing innovative diagnostic criteria for psychosis as reflecting a specific kind of rationality. Their ethical-clinical framework however, discouraged discussion of placing impositions on the mentally ill, even when in danger. According to these very criteria, Agassi’s institutional individualism framework renders paranoiacs defective in autonomy. Introducing the idea of degrees of autonomy as a guiding principle for research and practice will promote responsible (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  17
    Agassi’s Treatment of Mental Illness: The Perspectives of Critical Rationalism and Institutional Individualism.Nathaniel Laor - 2023 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 53 (1):3-15.
    Joseph Agassi, together with Yehuda Fried, presented the paradoxes of paranoia and proposed to explain and solve them by introducing innovative diagnostic criteria for psychosis as reflecting a specific kind of rationality. Their ethical-clinical framework however, discouraged discussion of placing impositions on the mentally ill, even when in danger. According to these very criteria, Agassi’s institutional individualism framework renders paranoiacs defective in autonomy. Introducing the idea of degrees of autonomy as a guiding principle for research and practice will promote responsible (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  58
    The Reality of Mental Illness.T. S. Champlin - 1981 - Philosophy 56 (218):467 - 487.
    My three main points are: Mental disease is a metaphor, but mental illness is not. Feeling ill and having a physical illness are logically related. If there were no such thing as feeling ill, there would be no such thing as suffering from a physical illness. Yet there is no logical connection between feeling ill and being mentally ill. Mental illness is manifested in various forms of behaviour, for example, suspiciousness, elation, depression, etc.; (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  50.  95
    Mind, body, and mental illness.Soren Holm - 1998 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 5 (4):337-341.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000