Results for 'Mere‐exposure effect'

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  1.  34
    The Role of Mere Exposure Effect on Ethical Tolerance: A Two-Study Approach.William A. Weeks, Justin G. Longenecker, Joseph A. McKinney & Carlos W. Moore - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 58 (4):281-294.
    This paper reports on the results from two studies that were conducted eight years apart with different respondents. The studies examined the role of the Mere Exposure Effect on ethical tolerance or acceptability of particular business decisions. The results from Study 1 show there is a significant difference in ethical judgment for 12 out of 16 vignettes between those who have been exposed to such situations compared to those who have not been exposed to them. In those 12 situations, (...)
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  2. Perceptual Learning, the Mere Exposure Effect and Aesthetic Antirealism.Bence Nanay - forthcoming - Leonardo.
    It has been argued that some recent experimental findings about the mere exposure effect can be used to argue for aesthetic antirealism: the view that there is no fact of the matter about aesthetic value. The aim of this paper is to assess this argument and point out that this strategy, as it stands, does not work. But we may still be able to use experimental findings about the mere exposure effect in order to engage with the aesthetic (...)
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  3.  50
    Implicit Preferences: The Role(s) of Familiarity in the Structural Mere Exposure Effect.D. Zizak - 2004 - Consciousness and Cognition 13 (2):336-362.
    In four experiments using an artificial grammar learning procedure, the authors examined the links between the “classic” mere exposure effect [heightened affect for previously encountered stimulus items ] and the “structural” mere exposure effect [greater hedonic appreciation for novel stimuli that conform to an implicitly acquired underlying rule system ]. After learning, participants: classified stimuli according to whether they conformed to the principles of the grammar and, rated them in terms of how much they liked them. In some (...)
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  4.  28
    The Mere Exposure Effect is Differentially Sensitive to Different Judgment Tasks.John G. Seamon, Patricia A. McKenna & Neil Binder - 1998 - Consciousness and Cognition 7 (1):85-102.
    The mere exposure effect is the increase in positive affect that results from the repeated exposure to previously novel stimuli. We sought to determine if judgments other than affective preference could reliably produce a mere exposure effect for two-dimensional random shapes. In two experiments, we found that brighter and darker judgments did not differentiate target from distracter shapes, liking judgments led to target selection greater than chance, and disliking judgments led to distracter selection greater than chance. These results (...)
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  5.  16
    Mere Exposure Effect: A Consequence of Direct and Indirect Fluency–Preference Links☆.S. WillemS & M. Vanderlinden - 2006 - Consciousness and Cognition 15 (2):323-341.
    In three experiments, picture quality between test items was manipulated to examine whether subjects’ expectations about the fluency normally associated with these different stimuli might influence the effects of fluency on preference or familiarity-based recognition responses. The results showed that fluency due to pre-exposure influenced responses less when objects were presented with high picture quality, suggesting that attributions of fluency to preference and familiarity are adjusted according to expectations about the different test pictures. However, this expectations influence depended on subjects’ (...)
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  6.  25
    Mere Exposure Effect: A Consequence of Direct and Indirect Fluency–Preference Links.Sylvie Willems & Martial Van der Linden - 2006 - Consciousness and Cognition 15 (2):323-341.
    In three experiments, picture quality between test items was manipulated to examine whether subjects’ expectations about the fluency normally associated with these different stimuli might influence the effects of fluency on preference or familiarity-based recognition responses. The results showed that fluency due to pre-exposure influenced responses less when objects were presented with high picture quality, suggesting that attributions of fluency to preference and familiarity are adjusted according to expectations about the different test pictures. However, this expectations influence depended on subjects’ (...)
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  7.  5
    The Mere Exposure Effect Depends on an Odor’s Initial Pleasantness.Sylvain Delplanque, Géraldine Coppin, Laurène Bloesch, Isabelle Cayeux & David Sander - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  8.  12
    Trait and State Anxiety Reduce the Mere Exposure Effect.Sandra L. Ladd & John D. E. Gabrieli - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  9.  11
    The Mere Exposure Effect and Recognition Memory.Man-Ying Wang & Hsio-Chuan Chang - 2004 - Cognition and Emotion 18 (8):1055-1078.
  10.  5
    The Contribution of Attention to the Mere Exposure Effect for Parts of Advertising Images.Yoshihiko Yagi & Kazuya Inoue - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  11.  2
    Eliminating the Mere Exposure Effect Through Changes in Context Between Exposure and Test.Daniel de Zilva, Chris J. Mitchell & Ben R. Newell - 2013 - Cognition and Emotion 27 (8):1345-1358.
  12. The Structural Mere Exposure Effect: The Dual Role of Familiarity.D. M. Zizak & A. S. Reber - 2004 - Consciousness and Cognition 13:336-362.
  13.  2
    Stimulus Threat and Exposure Context Modulate the Effect of Mere Exposure on Approach Behaviors.G. Young Steven, F. Jones Isaiah & M. Claypool Heather - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  14. The Mere Exposure Phenomenon: A Lingering Melody by Robert Zajonc.Richard L. Moreland & Sascha Topolinski - 2010 - Emotion Review 2 (4):329-339.
    The mere exposure phenomenon (repeated exposure to a stimulus is sufficient to improve attitudes toward that stimulus) is one of the most inspiring phenomena associated with Robert Zajonc’s long and productive career in social psychology. In the first part of this article, Richard Moreland (who was trained by Zajonc in graduate school) describes his own work on exposure and learning, and on the relationships among familiarity, similarity, and attraction in person perception. In the second part, Sascha Topolinski (a recent graduate (...)
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  15.  71
    Where Did Mill Go Wrong? Why the Capital-Managed Rather Than the Labor-Managed Enterprise is the Predominant.Schwartz Justin - 2012 - Ohio State Law Journal 73:220-85.
    In this Article, I propose a novel law and economics explanation of a deeply puzzling aspect of business organization in market economies. Why are virtually all firms organized as capital-managed and -owned (capitalist) enterprises rather than as labor-managed and -owned cooperatives? Over 150 years ago, J.S. Mill predicted that efficiency and other advantages would eventually make worker cooperatives predominant over capitalist firms. Mill was right about the advantages but wrong about the results. The standard explanation is that capitalist enterprise is (...)
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  16. The Ethics of Belief, Cognition, and Climate Change Pseudoskepticism: Implications for Public Discourse.Lawrence Torcello - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (1):19-48.
    The relationship between knowledge, belief, and ethics is an inaugural theme in philosophy; more recently, under the title “ethics of belief” philosophers have worked to develop the appropriate methodology for studying the nexus of epistemology, ethics, and psychology. The title “ethics of belief” comes from a 19th-century paper written by British philosopher and mathematician W.K. Clifford. Clifford argues that we are morally responsible for our beliefs because each belief that we form creates the cognitive circumstances for related beliefs to follow, (...)
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  17.  10
    The P600 in Implicit Artificial Grammar Learning.Susana Silva, Vasiliki Folia, Peter Hagoort & Karl Magnus Petersson - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (6):n/a-n/a.
    The suitability of the artificial grammar learning paradigm to capture relevant aspects of the acquisition of linguistic structures has been empirically tested in a number of EEG studies. Some have shown a syntax-related P600 component, but it has not been ruled out that the AGL P600 effect is a response to surface features rather than the underlying syntax structure. Therefore, in this study, we controlled for the surface characteristics of the test sequences and recorded the EEG before and after (...)
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  18.  7
    Mere Exposure in Reverse: Mood and Motion Modulate Memory Bias.Mark Rotteveel & R. Hans Phaf - 2007 - Cognition and Emotion 21 (6):1323-1346.
    Mere exposure, generally, entails influences of familiarity manipulations on affective dependent variables. Previously (Phaf & Rotteveel, 2005), we have argued that familiarity corresponds intrinsically to positive affect, and have extended the correspondence to novelty and negative affect. Here, we present two experiments that show reverse effects of affective manipulations on perceived familiarity. In Experiment 1 affectively valenced exteroceptive cues of approach and avoidance (e.g., apparent movement) modulated recognition bias of neutral targets. This finding suggests that our correspondence hypotheses can be (...)
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  19.  50
    Consciousness Organizes More Than Itself: Findings From Subliminal Mere Exposure Research.Robert F. Bornstein - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (3):332-333.
    Contrary to Perruchet & Vinter's self-organizing consciousness (SOC) model, subliminal mere exposure (SME) research indicates that stimuli perceived without awareness produce robust effects. Moreover, SME effects are significantly stronger than mere exposure effects produced by clearly recognized stimuli. The SOC model must be revised to accommodate findings from studies that use affect-based outcome measures.
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  20. Compensation for Mere Exposure to Risk.Nicole A. Vincent - 2005 - Australian Journal of Legal Philosophy 29:89-101.
    It could be argued that tort law is failing, and arguably an example of this failure is the recent public liability and insurance (‘PL&I’) crisis. A number of solutions have been proposed, but ultimately the chosen solution should address whatever we take to be the cause of this failure. On one account, the PL&I crisis is a result of an unwarranted expansion of the scope of tort law. Proponents of this position sometimes argue that the duty of care owed by (...)
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  21. Mere Exposure to Bad Art.Aaron Meskin, Mark Phelan, Margaret Moore & Matthew Kieran - 2013 - British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (2):139-164.
  22. The Baldwin Effect and Genetic Assimilation: Contrasting Explanatory Foci and Gene Concepts in Two Approaches to an Evolutionary Process.Paul Griffiths - 2006 - In P. Carruthers, S. Laurence & S. Stich (eds.), The Innate Mind: Cultural and Cognition. Oxford University Press. pp. 91-101.
    David Papineau (2003; 2005) has discussed the relationship between social learning and the family of postulated evolutionary processes that includes ‘organic selection’, ‘coincident selection’, ‘autonomisation’, ‘the Baldwin effect’ and ‘genetic assimilation’. In all these processes a trait which initially develops in the members of a population as a result of some interaction with the environment comes to develop without that interaction in their descendants. It is uncontroversial that the development of an identical phenotypic trait might depend on an interaction (...)
     
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  23. Mere Exposure to Money Increases Endorsement of Free-Market Systems and Social Inequality.Eugene M. Caruso, Kathleen D. Vohs, Brittani Baxter & Adam Waytz - 2013 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 142 (2):301.
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  24.  8
    Subliminal Mere Exposure and Explicit and Implicit Positive Affective Responses.Joshua A. Hicks & Laura A. King - 2011 - Cognition and Emotion 25 (4):726-729.
  25. Subliminal Mere Exposure Effects.Robert F. Bornstein - 1992 - In Robert F. Bornstein & T. S. Pittman (eds.), Perception Without Awareness. Guilford.
     
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  26.  5
    Mere Exposure Revisited: The Influence of Growth Versus Security Cues on Evaluations of Novel and Familiar Stimuli.Marleen Gillebaart, Jens Förster & Mark Rotteveel - 2012 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 141 (4):699-714.
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  27.  20
    Visual and Tactile Cross-Modal Mere Exposure Effects.Miho Suzuki & Jiro Gyoba - 2008 - Cognition and Emotion 22 (1):147-154.
  28.  12
    Are Subliminal Mere Exposure Effects a Form of Implicit Learning?Robert F. Bornstein - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):398-399.
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  29.  19
    Don’T Always Prefer My Chosen Objects: Low Level of Trait Autonomy and Autonomy Deprivation Decreases Mere Choice Effect.Zhe Shang, Tuoxin Tao & Lei Wang - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  30.  16
    The Effect of the Exposure Time Upon the R. L. Of Visible Motion.F. L. Dimmick & J. C. Karl - 1930 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 13 (4):365.
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  31.  10
    Effect of Luminance Exposure Duration, and Task Complexity on Reaction Time.Jaques Kaswan & Stephen Young - 1965 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 69 (4):393.
  32.  3
    Effect of Reduced Exposure Duration on Brightness Constancy.H. Leibowitz & P. Chinetti - 1957 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 54 (1):49.
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  33.  2
    What You Cannot See Can Help You: The Effect of Exposure to Unreportable Stimuli on Approach Behavior.Joel Weinberger, Paul Siegel, Caleb Siefert & Julie Drwal - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):173-180.
    We examined effects of exposure to unreportable images of spiders on approach towards a tarantula. Pretests revealed awareness of the stimuli was at chance. Participants high or low on fear of spiders were randomly assigned to receive computer-generated exposure to unreportable pictures of spiders or outdoor scenes. They then engaged in a Behavioral Approach Task with a live tarantula. Non-fearful participants completed more BAT items than spider-fearful individuals. Additionally, as predicted, a significant interaction = 5.12, p < .03) between fear (...)
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  34. Is Affect Always Mere Effect?Mark Johnston - 2001 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (1):225-228.
    Ralph Wedgwood balks at my argument at three significant points. I have some brief, and I hope helpful, reactions to the resistance that he offers.
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  35.  1
    Apparent Depth From Progressive Exposure of Moving Shadows: The Kinetic Depth Effect in a Narrow Aperture.R. H. Day - 1989 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 27 (4):320-322.
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  36.  20
    Chronic Respiratory Symptoms and Ventilatory Function in Workers Exposed to Tea Dust: Effect of Duration of Exposure and Smoking.Jordan Minov, J. Karadzinska-Bislimovska, Snežana Risteska-Kuc & Sašo Stoleski - 2005 - Facta Universitatis 12 (1):37-43.
  37.  11
    Neuroprotective Effect of Ginseng Against Alteration of Calcium Binding Proteins Immunoreactivity in the Mice Hippocampus After Chronic Radiofrequency Exposure.Maskey Dhiraj, Kim Myeung Ju & Kim Hyung Gun - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  38.  16
    The Effect of Very Brief Exposure on Experienced Fear After in Vivo Exposure.Paul Siegel & Richard Warren - 2013 - Cognition and Emotion 27 (6):1013-1022.
  39.  14
    The Effect of Early Social Isolation on Imitative Pecking in Young Chicks: The Influence of Repeated Exposure to the Testing Situation.Darwin Dorr & Jack G. May - 1973 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 2 (2):101-102.
  40.  8
    The Effect of Exposure to Lingual Vibrotactile Magnitude Estimation on Lingual Vibrotactile Magnitude Production Results.Donald Fucci, Linda Petrosino, Daniel Harris & Elise M. McMath - 1985 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 23 (3):199-201.
  41.  9
    Effect of Elastic Deformation of the Honing Stone on the Exposure of Si-Crystals in a Hyper-Eutectic-Si Aluminum Cylinder Block.Hiroshi Yamagata & Hirotaka Kurita - 2005 - In Alan F. Blackwell & David MacKay (eds.), Power. Cambridge University Press. pp. 2013--10.
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  42.  8
    The Effect of Practice with Brief-Exposure Techniques Upon Central and Peripheral Visual Acuity and a Search for a Brief Test of Peripheral Acuity.Robert H. Bruce & Frank N. Low - 1951 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 41 (4):275.
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  43.  4
    The Bilingual Disadvantage in Speech Understanding in Noise Is Likely a Frequency Effect Related to Reduced Language Exposure.Jens Schmidtke - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  44.  5
    The Effect of Pre-Exposure to Complex Stimuli on Activity in a Novel Environment.Gerald W. Morlock & Merle E. Meyer - 1976 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 7 (1):53-54.
  45. Word Superiority Effect Without a Brief Exposure.W. Prinzmetal - 1990 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 28 (6):506-506.
  46.  16
    Can Deontological Principles Be Unified? Reflections on the Mere Means Principle.Stijn Bruers - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (2):407-422.
    The mere means principle says it is impermissible to treat someone as merely a means to someone else’s ends. I specify this principle with two conditions: a victim is used as merely a means if the victim does not want the treatment by the agent and the agent wants the presence of the victim’s body. This principle is a specification of the doctrine of double effect which is compatible with moral intuitions and with a restricted kind of libertarianism. An (...)
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  47. Beauty, a Road to the Truth.Theo A. F. Kuipers - 2002 - Synthese 131 (3):291-328.
    In this article I give a naturalistic-cum-formal analysis of therelation between beauty, empirical success, and truth. The analysis is based on the onehand on a hypothetical variant of the so-called `mere-exposure effect'' which has been more orless established in experimental psychology regarding exposure-affect relationshipsin general and aesthetic appreciation in particular (Zajonc 1968; Temme 1983; Bornstein 1989;Ye 2000). On the other hand it is based on the formal theory of truthlikeness andtruth approximation as presented in my From Instrumentalism to Constructive (...)
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  48.  91
    Approaching Descriptive and Theoretical Truth.Theo A. F. Kuipers - 1982 - Erkenntnis 18 (3):343 - 378.
    In this article I give a naturalistic-cum-formal analysis of the relation between beauty, empirical success, and truth. The analysis is based on the one hand on a hypothetical variant of the so-called 'mere-exposure effect' which has been more or less established in experimental psychology regarding exposure-affect relationships in general and aesthetic appreciation in particular (Zajonc 1968; Temme 1983; Bornstein 1989; (Ye 2000). On the other hand it is based on the formal theory of truthlikeness and truth approximation as presented (...)
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  49.  12
    Beauty, A Road To The Truth.Theo Kuipers - 2002 - Synthese 131 (3):291-328.
    In this article I give a naturalistic-cum-formal analysis of the relation between beauty, empirical success, and truth. The analysis is based on the one hand on a hypothetical variant of the so-called 'mere-exposure effect' which has been more or less established in experimental psychology regarding exposure-affect relationships in general and aesthetic appreciation in particular. On the other hand it is based on the formal theory of truthlikeness and truth approximation as presented in my "From Instrumentalism to Constructive Realism". The (...)
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  50.  37
    Degrees of Attention in Experiencing Art.Ancuta Mortu - 2018 - Estetika 55 (1):45-66.
    This paper examines gradients of attention in relation to aesthetic appreciation. My main claim is that we should leave open the possibility that aesthetic response might be triggered by stimulations taking place far from the centre of one’s focused attention. In support of this claim I first discuss the notion of ‘periphery of attention’ and the challenges that it poses to contemporary psychological theories of aesthetics. I provide four criteria for differentiating between several types of attentional processes and then proceed (...)
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