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Michael A. Schwartz [22]Michael Alan Schwartz [5]
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Michael Schwartz
Texas A&M University
  1.  80
    The Six Most Essential Questions in Psychiatric Diagnosis: A Pluralogue Part 3: Issues of Utility and Alternative Approaches in Psychiatric Diagnosis. [REVIEW]Peter Zachar, Owen Whooley, GScott Waterman, Jerome C. Wakefield, Thomas Szasz, Michael A. Schwartz, Claire Pouncey, Douglas Porter, Harold A. Pincus, Ronald W. Pies, Joseph M. Pierre, Joel Paris, Aaron L. Mishara, Elliott B. Martin, Steven G. LoBello, Warren A. Kinghorn, Andrew C. Hinderliter, Gary Greenberg, Nassir Ghaemi, Michael B. First, Hannah S. Decker, John Chardavoyne, Michael A. Cerullo, Allen Frances & James Phillips - 2012 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 7 (1):9-.
    In face of the multiple controversies surrounding the DSM process in general and the development of DSM-5 in particular, we have organized a discussion around what we consider six essential questions in further work on the DSM. The six questions involve: 1) the nature of a mental disorder; 2) the definition of mental disorder; 3) the issue of whether, in the current state of psychiatric science, DSM-5 should assume a cautious, conservative posture or an assertive, transformative posture; 4) the role (...)
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  2. Temporal Experience in Mania.Marcin Moskalewicz & Michael A. Schwartz - 2020 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 19 (2):291-304.
    The paper examines both the phenomenology of the manic self as well as critical aspects of manic neurobiology, focusing, with respect to both domains, on manic temporality. We argue that the distortions of lived time in mania exceed mere acceleration and are fundamental for manic affectivity. Mania involves radical acceleration and radical asynchronicity, which result in an instantaneous existence. People with mania rebel against the facticity of reality and suffer from an existential leap towards the future, in which the self (...)
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  3.  9
    Phenomenology of Intuitive Judgment: Praecox-Feeling in the Diagnosis of Schizophrenia.Marcin Moskalewicz, Michael A. Schwartz & Tudi Gozé - 2018 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 9 (2):63-74.
    This paper argues that intuition plays a role in the diagnosis of schizophrenia and presents its phenomenological rationale. A discussion of self-assessment questionnaires and empirical studies in the clinical setting provides evidence that despite the prevalence of operational diagnosis, the intuitive judgment of schizophrenia continues to take place. Two related notions of intuitive diagnosis are presented: Minkowski’s diagnostic by penetration and Rümke’s praecox feeling. Further on, the paper explores and clarifies the phenomenology behind the praecox feeling. First, it is argued, (...)
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  4.  72
    The Six Most Essential Questions in Psychiatric Diagnosis: A Pluralogue Part 1: Conceptual and Definitional Issues in Psychiatric Diagnosis. [REVIEW]James Phillips, Allen Frances, Michael A. Cerullo, John Chardavoyne, Hannah S. Decker, Michael B. First, Nassir Ghaemi, Gary Greenberg, Andrew C. Hinderliter, Warren A. Kinghorn, Steven G. LoBello, Elliott B. Martin, Aaron L. Mishara, Joel Paris, Joseph M. Pierre, Ronald W. Pies, Harold A. Pincus, Douglas Porter, Claire Pouncey, Michael A. Schwartz, Thomas Szasz, Jerome C. Wakefield, G. Scott Waterman, Owen Whooley & Peter Zachar - 2012 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 7:1-29.
    In face of the multiple controversies surrounding the DSM process in general and the development of DSM-5 in particular, we have organized a discussion around what we consider six essential questions in further work on the DSM. The six questions involve: 1) the nature of a mental disorder; 2) the definition of mental disorder; 3) the issue of whether, in the current state of psychiatric science, DSM-5 should assume a cautious, conservative posture or an assertive, transformative posture; 4) the role (...)
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  5. The Six Most Essential Questions in Psychiatric Diagnosis: A Pluralogue Part 2: Issues of Conservatism and Pragmatism in Psychiatric Diagnosis. [REVIEW]James Phillips, Allen Frances, Michael A. Cerullo, John Chardavoyne, Hannah S. Decker, Michael B. First, Nassir Ghaemi, Gary Greenberg, Andrew C. Hinderliter, Warren A. Kinghorn, Steven G. LoBello, Elliott B. Martin, Aaron L. Mishara, Joel Paris, Joseph M. Pierre, Ronald W. Pies, Harold A. Pincus, Douglas Porter, Claire Pouncey, Michael A. Schwartz, Thomas Szasz, Jerome C. Wakefield, G. Waterman, Owen Whooley & Peter Zachar - 2012 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 7:8-.
    In face of the multiple controversies surrounding the DSM process in general and the development of DSM-5 in particular, we have organized a discussion around what we consider six essential questions in further work on the DSM. The six questions involve: 1) the nature of a mental disorder; 2) the definition of mental disorder; 3) the issue of whether, in the current state of psychiatric science, DSM-5 should assume a cautious, conservative posture or an assertive, transformative posture; 4) the role (...)
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  6.  13
    Temporal experience in mania.Marcin Moskalewicz & Michael A. Schwartz - 2018 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-14.
    The paper examines both the phenomenology of the manic self as well as critical aspects of manic neurobiology, focusing, with respect to both domains, on manic temporality. We argue that the distortions of lived time in mania exceed mere acceleration and are fundamental for manic affectivity. Mania involves radical acceleration and radical asynchronicity, which result in an instantaneous existence. People with mania rebel against the facticity of reality and suffer from an existential leap towards the future, in which the self (...)
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  7.  49
    Psychosomatic Medicine and the Philosophy of Life.Michael A. Schwartz & Osborne P. Wiggins - 2010 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 5:1-5.
    Basing ourselves on the writings of Hans Jonas, we offer to psychosomatic medicine a philosophy of life that surmounts the mind-body dualism which has plagued Western thought since the origins of modern science in seventeenth century Europe. Any present-day account of reality must draw upon everything we know about the living and the non-living. Since we are living beings ourselves, we know what it means to be alive from our own first-hand experience. Therefore, our philosophy of life, in addition to (...)
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  8. Rebuilding Reality: A Phenomenology of Aspects of Chronic Schizophrenia. [REVIEW]Michael A. Schwartz, Osborne P. Wiggins, Jean Naudin & Manfred Spitzer - 2005 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (1):91-115.
    Schizophrenia, like other pathological conditions of mental life, has not been systematically included in the general study of consciousness. By focusing on aspects of chronic schizophrenia, we attempt to remedy this omission. Basic components of Husserl’s phenomenology (intentionality, synthesis, constitution, epoche, and unbuilding) are explicated and then employed in an account of chronic schizophrenia. In schizophrenic experience, basic constituents of reality are lost and the subject must try to explicitly re-constitute them. “Automatic mental life” is weakened such that much of (...)
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  9.  63
    The Six Most Essential Questions in Psychiatric Diagnosis: A Pluralogue. Part 4: General Conclusion.James Phillips, Allen Frances, Michael A. Cerullo, John Chardavoyne, Hannah S. Decker, Michael B. First, Nassir Ghaemi, Gary Greenberg, Andrew C. Hinderliter, Warren A. Kinghorn, Steven G. LoBello, Elliott B. Martin, Aaron L. Mishara, Joel Paris, Joseph M. Pierre, Ronald W. Pies, Harold A. Pincus, Douglas Porter, Claire Pouncey, Michael A. Schwartz, Thomas Szasz, Jerome C. Wakefield, G. Scott Waterman, Owen Whooley & Peter Zachar - 2012 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 7:14-.
    In the conclusion to this multi-part article I first review the discussions carried out around the six essential questions in psychiatric diagnosis – the position taken by Allen Frances on each question, the commentaries on the respective question along with Frances’ responses to the commentaries, and my own view of the multiple discussions. In this review I emphasize that the core question is the first – what is the nature of psychiatric illness – and that in some manner all further (...)
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  10.  56
    Edmund Husserl's Influence on Karl Jaspers's Phenomenology.Osborne P. Wiggins & Michael Alan Schwartz - 1997 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 4 (1):15-36.
    Karl Jaspers' phenomenology remains important today, not solely because of its continuing influence in some areas of psychiatry, but because, if fully understood, it can provide a method and set of concepts for making new progress in the science of psychopathology. In order to understand this method and set of concepts, it helps to recognize the significant influence that Edmund Husserl's early work, Logical investigations, exercised on Jaspers' formulation of them. We trace the Husserlian influence while clarifying the main components (...)
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  11. Philosophical Perspectives on Psychiatric Diagnostic Classification.John Z. Sadfer, Osborne P. Wiggins, Michael A. Schwartz & Edwin Harari - 1996 - Bioethics 10 (2):158-160.
  12.  63
    Richard Zaner’s Phenomenology of the Clinical Encounter.Osborne P. Wiggins & Michael A. Schwartz - 2004 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (1):73-87.
    The clinical ethics propounded by Richard Zaner is unique. Partly because of his phenomenological orientation and partly because of his own daily practice as a clinical ethicist in a large university hospital, Zaner focuses on the particular concrete situations in which patients and their families confront illness and injury and struggle toward workable ways for dealing with them. He locates ethical reality in the clinical encounter. This encounter encompasses not only patient and physician but also the patients family and friends (...)
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  13.  18
    Deaf Patients, Doctors, and the Law: Compelling a Conversation About Communication.Michael A. Schwartz - unknown
    Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) grants people with disabilities access to public accommodations, including the offices of medical providers, equal to that enjoyed by persons without disabilities. The Department of Justice (DOJ) has unequivocally declared that the law requires effective communication between the medical provider and the Deaf patient. Because most medical providers are not fluent in sign language, the DOJ has recognized that effective communication calls for the use of appropriate auxiliary aids, including sign language (...)
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  14. Philosophical Perspectives on Psychiatric Diagnostic Classification.John Z. Sadler, Osborne P. Wiggins, Michael A. Schwartz & Mario Rossi Monti - 1996 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 18 (2):241.
  15.  43
    Death, Organ Transplantation and Medical Practice.Thomas S. Huddle, Michael A. Schwartz, F. Amos Bailey & Michael A. Bos - 2008 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 3:5.
    A series of papers in Philosophy, Ethics and Humanities in Medicine (PEHM) have recently disputed whether non-heart beating organ donors are alive and whether non-heart beating organ donation (NHBD) contravenes the dead donor rule. Several authors who argue that NHBD involves harvesting organs from live patients appeal to.
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  16.  1
    Temporal experience as a core quality in mental disorders.Marcin Moskalewicz & Michael A. Schwartz - 2020 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 19 (2):207-216.
    The goal of this paper is to introduce Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences’ thematic issue on disordered temporalities. The authors begin by discussing the main reason for the neglect of temporal experience in present-day psychiatric nosologies, mainly, its reduction to clock time. Methodological challenges facing research on temporal experience include addressing the felt sense of time, its structure, and its pre-reflective aspects in the life-world setting. In the second part, the paper covers the contributions to the thematic issue concerning temporal (...)
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  17.  5
    Community and Society, Melancholy and Sociopathy.Osborne Wiggins & Michael A. Schwartz - 2002 - In Philip Alperson (ed.), Diversity and Community: An Interdisciplinary Reader. Blackwell. pp. 231--246.
  18.  41
    Comments on Mohammed Abouelleil Rashed’s “a Critical Perspective on Second-Order Empathy in Understanding Psychopathology: Phenomenology and Ethics”.Jann E. Schlimme, Osborne P. Wiggins & Michael A. Schwartz - 2015 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 36 (2):117-120.
    Understanding the mental life of persons with psychosis/schizophrenia has been the crucial challenge of psychiatry since its origins, both for scientific models as well as for every therapeutic encounter between persons with and without psychosis/schizophrenia. Nonetheless, a preliminary understanding is always the first step of phenomenological as well as other qualitative research methods addressing persons with psychotic experiences in their life-world. In contrast to Rashed's assertions, in order to achieve such understanding, phenomenological psychopathologists need not necessarily adopt the transcendental-phenomenological attitude, (...)
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  19.  2
    The Gift of Insanity. The Rise and Fall of Cultures From a Psychiatric Perspective.Marcin Moskalewicz, Michael A. Schwartz & Osborne Wiggins - 2018 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 2 (2):27-37.
    This paper argues in favor of two related theses. First, due to a fundamental, biologically grounded world-openness, human culture is a biological imperative. As both biology and culture evolve historically, cultures rise and fall and the diversity of the human species develops. Second, in this historical process of rise and fall, abnormality plays a crucial role. From the perspective of a broader context traditionally addressed by speculative philosophies of history, the so-called mental disorders may be seen as entailing particular functional (...)
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  20.  16
    Techniques and Persons: Habermasian Reflections on Medical Ethics. [REVIEW]Osborne P. Wiggins & Michael Alan Schwartz - 1986 - Human Studies 9 (4):365 - 377.
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  21.  54
    Phenomenological Psychiatry Needs a Big Tent.Osborne P. Wiggins & Michael A. Schwartz - 2011 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 18 (1):31-32.
    This article by Louis Sass, Josef Parnas, and Dan Zahavi takes us into the midst of a debate over recent developments in phenomenological psychiatry. In "Phenomenological Psychopathology and Schizophrenia: Contemporary Approaches and Misunderstandings" (Sass et al. 2011), Sass et al. are responding to criticisms of their position lodged by Aaron L. Mishara in "Missing Links in Phenomenological Clinical Neuroscience: Why We Are Still Not There Yet" (Mishara 2007). In their reply, Sass et al. offer several helpful clarifications and justifications of (...)
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  22. Phenomenological and Hermeneutic Models. Understanding and Interpretation in Psychiatry.Michael A. Schwartz & Osborne P. Wiggins - 2004 - In Jennifer Radden (ed.), The Philosophy of Psychiatry: A Companion. Oxford University Press. pp. 351--363.
     
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  23.  22
    Commentary on" Encoding of Meaning".Michael Alan Schwartz & Osborne P. Wiggins - 1997 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 4 (4):277-282.
  24.  30
    Husserlian Comments on Blankenburg's "Psychopathology of Common Sense".Osborne P. Wiggins, Michael Alan Schwartz & Jean Naudin - 2001 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 8 (4):327-329.
  25. Criteria for Physiological Substrates of Unconscious Processes.Michael A. Schwartz - 1981 - American Psychologist 36:434-435.
  26.  9
    Chris Walker's Interpretation of Karl Jaspers' Phenomenology: A Critique.Osborne P. Wiggins & Michael Alan Schwartz - 1995 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 2 (4):319-343.
  27.  8
    Commentary on" Neurosis and the Historic Quest for Security".Michael A. Schwartz & Osborne P. Wiggins - 1998 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 5 (4):329-331.