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  1.  10
    The Value of Facts in Boyle's Experimental Philosophy.Michael Ben-Chaim - 2000 - History of Science 38 (1):57-77.
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  2.  5
    The Disenchanted World and Beyond: Toward an Ecological Perspective on Science.Michael Ben-Chaim - 1998 - History of the Human Sciences 11 (1):101-127.
    Positivism and, especially, Max Weber's vision of the modern disen chantment of the world are incoherent because they separate human culture from the environment in which human agents pursue their life- projects. The same problem is manifested, more blatantly, in current social studies of science, which take the project of disenchantment further by disenchanting science itself. A different image of science is traced to classical empiricism, whose paradigm of learning is belief and, more specifically, the practical nature of the believer's (...)
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  3.  5
    Doctrine And Use:Newton's "Gift Of Teaching".Michael Ben-Chaim - 1998 - History of Science 36 (3):269-298.
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  4.  24
    Knowledge and the Body-Mind Problem & the Myth of the Framework by Karl Popper.Michael Ben-Chaim - 1998 - Philosophia 26 (3-4):529-544.
  5.  8
    The Discovery of Natural Goods: Newton's Vocation as an ‘Experimental Philosopher’.Michael Ben-Chaim - 2001 - British Journal for the History of Science 34 (4):395-416.
    While the study of Newton's religious views has been continuously expanding, it has not been brought to bear directly on Newton's career as an ‘experimental philosopher’. Historical perspectives on his optical experiments in particular affirm the historiographic separation between the religious and scientific aspects of his work. In this paper I examine the practical implication of Newton's theology of dominion on his early experiments on light and colours. While his predecessors had made experiments to collect evidence, I show that Newton (...)
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  6.  7
    The Empiric Experience and the Practice of Autonomy.Michael Ben-Chaim - 1992 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 23 (4):533-555.
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  7.  1
    Empowering Lay Belief: Robert Boyle and the Moral Economy of Experiment.Michael Ben-Chaim - 2002 - Science in Context 15 (1).
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  8.  5
    Doctrine and USE: NEWTON'S.Michael Ben-Chaim - 1998 - History of Science 36:269-298.
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  9.  1
    The Scientific Discovery of ‘Natural Capital’: The Production of Catalytic Antibodies.Michael Ben-Chaim - 2001 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 32 (3):413-433.
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  10. Experimental Philosophy and the Birth of Empirical Science Boyle, Locke, and Newton.Michael Ben-Chaim - 2004
     
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  11. Science, Education, and the Common Good.Michael Ben-Chaim & Barry Kosmin - 2007 - Free Inquiry 27:22-23.
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  12. Social Mobility and Scientific Change: Stephen Gray's Contribution to Electrical Research.Michael Ben-Chaim - 1990 - British Journal for the History of Science 23 (1):3-24.
    The concept of electrical conductivity, or, as initially coined by Stephen Gray , ‘electrical communication’, has always been assigned an important role in the history of electrical research. Some thirty-five years after Gray's ‘electrical communication’ acquired wide attention, Priestley employed the concept of conductivity to define physical reality, thus giving a privileged position to the science he himself endeavoured to cultivate. As he argued in the introduction to The History and Present State of Electricity , ‘the electrical fluid is no (...)
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  13. The Disenchanted World and Beyond: Toward an Ecological Perspective on Science.Michael Ben-Chaim - 1997 - History of the Human Sciences 10 (5):101-127.
    Positivism and, especially, Max Weber's vision of the modern disen chantment of the world are incoherent because they separate human culture from the environment in which human agents pursue their life- projects. The same problem is manifested, more blatantly, in current social studies of science, which take the project of disenchantment further by disenchanting science itself. A different image of science is traced to classical empiricism, whose paradigm of learning is belief and, more specifically, the practical nature of the believer's (...)
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  14. The Empiric Experience and the Practice of Autonomy.Michael Ben-Chaim - 1991 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 23 (4):533-555.
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