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  1.  37
    Designing Ethicists.Michael C. Brannigan - 1996 - Health Care Analysis 4 (3):206-218.
    In the United States, disturbing concerns pertaining to both how putative bioethicists are perceived and the potential for the abuse of their power in connection with these perceptions compel close examination. This paper addresses these caveats by examining two fundamental and interrelated components in the image-construction of the ethicist: definitional and contextual. Definitional features reveal that perceptions and images of the ethicist are especially subject to distortion due to a lack of clarity as to the nature and qualifications of the (...)
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  2.  60
    Connecting the Dots in Cultural Competency: Institutional Strategies and Conceptual Caveats.Michael C. Brannigan - 2008 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (2):173-184.
    Hideo Kimura, a 46-year-old Japanese male patient in a Boston hospital, needs to undergo surgery to remove part of his lower intestine but resists signing the consent form and has little understanding of English. Discussing this with an interpreter, Hideo is puzzled, because he has already authorized his wife Sachiko to decide on his behalf. The interpreter points out to him that he has a right, a moral right, to give his informed consent to the surgery and that Hideo is (...)
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  3.  24
    Striking a Balance: A Primer in Traditional Asian Values.Michael C. Brannigan - 2009 - Lexington Books.
    Introduction -- Hindu ethics -- Life's four goals -- Paths to Enlightenment -- Karma and rebirth -- Shades of Dharma -- Buddhist ethics -- The middle path -- The four noble truths -- In the wake of karma -- The four supreme virtues -- What is a Buddhist social ethics? -- Zen Buddhist ethics -- A way of the monk : practice is attainment -- A way of the warrior -- A way of tea : the virtue of presence -- (...)
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  4.  17
    Organ Extraction From Executed Prisoners: Confucian Considerations.Michael C. Brannigan - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (2):27-28.
  5. The Pulse of Wisdom the Philosophies of India, China, and Japan.Michael C. Brannigan - 1994
     
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  6.  65
    Introduction: Telos, Culture, and Enhancement Technologies. [REVIEW]Michael C. Brannigan - 2012 - Health Care Analysis 20 (4):319-327.
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  7.  62
    Reversibility as a Radical Ground for an Ontology of the Body in Medicine.Michael C. Brannigan - 1992 - The Personalist Forum 8 (Supplement):219-224.
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  8.  62
    Heeding Community Voices in Medical Futility Guidelines.Michael C. Brannigan - 2008 - HEC Forum 20 (2):105-125.
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  9.  21
    Ikiru and Net-Casting in Intercultural Bioethics.Michael C. Brannigan - 2009 - In Sandra Shapshay (ed.), Bioethics at the Movies. Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 345.
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  10.  44
    Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Pradip Bhattacharya, Edward T. Ulrich, Joseph A. Bracken, Richard Weiss, Christopher Key Chapple, Michael C. Brannigan, Theodore M. Ludwig, S. Nagarajan, Michael H. Fisher, Steve Derné, Herman Tull, Jarrod W. Brown, Joanna Kirkpatrick, Edward T. Ulrich, Carl Olson & Deepak Sarma - 2004 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 8 (1-3):203-227.
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  11.  18
    Medical Feeding: Applying Husserl and Merleau-Ponty.Michael C. Brannigan - 2001 - In Kay Toombs (ed.), Handbook of Phenomenology and Medicine. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 441--454.
  12.  14
    Relationality and Consensus in Japan: Implications for Bioethics Policy.Michael C. Brannigan - 1999 - Health Care Analysis 7 (3):289-296.
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  13. Cross-Cultural Biotechnology: A Reader.Michael C. Brannigan (ed.) - 2004 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This book is a rich blend of analyses by leading experts from various cultures and disciplines. A compact introduction to a complex field, it illustrates biotechnology's profound impact upon the environment and society. Moreover, it underscores the vital relevance of cultural values. This book empowers readers to more critically assess biotechnology's value and effectiveness within both specific cultural and global contexts.
     
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  14.  25
    Cultural Fault Lines in Healthcare: Reflections on Cultural Competency.Michael C. Brannigan - 2011 - Lexington Books.
    An invaluable work especially for professionals and students in health care, bioethics, humanities, cultural studies, and for the educated lay reader, this volume offers a critical reflection on cultural competence and awareness in health care, an arena where world views and values often collide.
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  15. Japan's March 2011 Disaster and Moral Grit: Our Inescapable in-Between.Michael C. Brannigan - 2015 - Lexington Books.
    This book raises questions about what really matters through its account of Japan’s March 11, 2011, triple catastrophe of earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear meltdown, exploring the relationship between culture, community, and disaster.
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  16. Japan’s Responses to the March 2011 Disaster: Our Inescapable in-Between.Michael C. Brannigan - 2015 - Lexington Books.
    This book raises questions about what really matters through its account of Japan’s March 11, 2011, triple catastrophe of earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear meltdown, exploring the relationship between culture, community, and disaster.
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