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Michael Davis [269]Michael T. Davis [26]Michael M. Davis [3]Michael C. Davis [2]
Michael Stuart Davis [1]Michael Francis Davis [1]Michael Hunter Davis [1]Michael Peter Davis [1]

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Michael Davis
State University of New York at Buffalo
M. J. Davis
Universidad de Los Andes
  1. Thinking Like an Engineer: Studies in the Ethics of a Profession.Michael Davis - 1998 - Oxford University Press.
    Michael Davis, a leading figure in the study of professional ethics, offers here both a compelling exploration of engineering ethics and a philosophical analysis of engineering as a profession. After putting engineering in historical perspective, Davis turns to the Challenger space shuttle disaster to consider the complex relationship between engineering ideals and contemporary engineering practice. Here, Davis examines how social organization and technical requirements define how engineers should (and presumably do) think. Later chapters test his analysis of engineering judgement and (...)
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  2.  49
    “Ain't No One Here But Us Social Forces”: Constructing the Professional Responsibility of Engineers. [REVIEW]Michael Davis - 2012 - Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (1):13-34.
    There are many ways to avoid responsibility, for example, explaining what happens as the work of the gods, fate, society, or the system. For engineers, “technology” or “the organization” will serve this purpose quite well. We may distinguish at least nine (related) senses of “responsibility”, the most important of which are: (a) responsibility-as-causation (the storm is responsible for flooding), (b) responsibility-as-liability (he is the person responsible and will have to pay), (c) responsibility-as-competency (he’s a responsible person, that is, he’s rational), (...)
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  3. Conflict of Interest in the Professions.Michael Davis & Andrew Stark (eds.) - 2001 - Oxford University Press.
    Conflicts of interest pose special problems for the professions. Even the appearance of a conflict of interest can undermine essential trust between professional and public. This volume is a comprehensive and accessible guide to the ramifications and problems associated with important issue. It contains fifteen new essays by noted scholars and covers topics in law, medicine, journalism, engineering, financial services, and others.
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  4.  29
    Ethics and the University.Michael Davis - 1999 - Routledge.
    _Ethics and the University_ brings together two closely related topics, the practice of ethics in the university and the teaching of practical or applied ethics in the university. This volume is divided into four parts: * A survey of practical ethics, offering an explanation of its recent emergence as a university subject, situating that subject into a wider social and historical context and identifying some problems that the subject generates for universities * An examination of research ethics, including the problem (...)
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  5. Thinking Like an Engineer: The Place of a Code of Ethics in the Practice of a Profession.Michael Davis - 1991 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 20 (2):150-167.
  6.  56
    Integrating Ethics Into Technical Courses: Micro-Insertion. [REVIEW]Michael Davis - 2006 - Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (4):717-730.
    Perhaps the most common reason science and engineering faculty give for not including “ethics” (that is, research ethics, engineering ethics, or some discussion of professional responsibility) in their technical classes is that “there is no room”. This article 1) describes a technique (“micro-insertion”) that introduces ethics (and related topics) into technical courses in small enough units not to push out technical material, 2) explains where this technique might fit into the larger undertaking of integrating ethics into the technical (scientific or (...)
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  7.  79
    Punishment Theory's Golden Half Century: A Survey of Developments From (About) 1957 to 2007. [REVIEW]Michael Davis - 2009 - The Journal of Ethics 13 (1):73 - 100.
    This paper describes developments in punishment theory since the middle of the twentieth century. After the mid–1960s, what Stanley I. Benn called “preventive theories of punishment”—whether strictly utilitarian or more loosely consequentialist like his—entered a long and steep decline, beginning with the virtual disappearance of reform theory in the 1970s. Crowding out preventive theories were various alternatives generally (but, as I shall argue, misleadingly) categorized as “retributive”. These alternatives include both old theories (such as the education theory) resurrected after many (...)
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  8.  48
    The Professional Approach to Engineering Ethics: Five Research Questions.Michael Davis - 2001 - Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (3):379-390.
    This paper argues that research for engineering ethics should routinely involve philosophers, social scientists, and engineers, and should focus for now on certain basic questions such as: Who is an engineer? What is engineering? What do engineers do? How do they make decisions? And how much control do they actually have over what they do?
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  9. The Moral Justifiability of Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman, or Degrading Treatment.Michael Davis - 2005 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 19 (2):161-178.
    Since Henry Shue’s classic 1978 paper on torture, the “ticking-bomb case” has seemed to demonstrate that torture is morally justified in some moral emergencies (even if not as an institution). After presenting an analysis of torture as such and an explanation of why it, and anything much like it, is morally wrong, I argue that the ticking-bomb case demonstrates nothing at all—for at least three reasons. First, it is an appeal to intuition. The intuition is not as widely shared as (...)
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  10.  26
    A Plea for Judgment.Michael Davis - 2012 - Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (4):789-808.
    Judgment is central to engineering, medicine, the sciences and many other practical activities. For example, one who otherwise knows what engineers know but lacks engineering judgment may be an expert of sorts, a handy resource much like a reference book or database, but cannot be a competent engineer. Though often overlooked or at least passed over in silence, the central place of judgment in engineering, the sciences, and the like should be obvious once pointed out. It is important here because (...)
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  11. Eighteen Rules for Writing a Code of Professional Ethics.Michael Davis - 2007 - Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (2):171-189.
    Most professional societies, scientific associations, and the like that undertake to write a code of ethics do so using other codes as models but without much (practical) guidance about how to do the work. The existing literature on codes is much more concerned with content than procedure. This paper adds to guidance already in the literature what I learned from participating in the writing of an important code of ethics. The guidance is given in the form of “rules” each of (...)
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  12. How to Make the Punishment Fit the Crime.Michael Davis - 1982 - Ethics 93 (4):726-752.
  13.  36
    Engineering Ethics, Individuals, and Organizations.Michael Davis - 2006 - Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (2):223-231.
    This article evaluates a family of criticism of how engineering ethics is now generally taught. The short version of the criticism might be put this way: Teachers of engineering ethics devote too much time to individual decisions and not enough time to social context. There are at least six version of this criticism, each corresponding to a specific subject omitted. Teachers of engineering ethics do not (it is said) teach enough about: 1) the culture of organizations; 2) the organization of (...)
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  14.  35
    Imaginary Cases in Ethics.Michael Davis - 2012 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (1):1-17.
    By “case,” I mean a proxy for some state of affairs, event, sequence of events, or other fact. A case may be as short as a phrase or longer than War and Peace. A case may consist of words or have a more dramatic form, such as a movie, stage performance, or computer simulation. Imaginary cases plainly have an important role in contemporary ethics, especially in applied or practical ethics. This paper is a systematic critique of imaginary cases in ethics (...)
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  15.  5
    Why Punish?Michael Davis - 1991
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  16.  25
    Assessing Graduate Student Progress in Engineering Ethics.Michael Davis & Alan Feinerman - 2012 - Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (2):351-367.
    Under a grant from the National Science Foundation, the authors (and others) undertook to integrate ethics into graduate engineering classes at three universities—and to assess success in a way allowing comparison across classes (and institutions). This paper describes the attempt to carry out that assessment. Standard methods of assessment turned out to demand too much class time. Under pressure from instructors, the authors developed an alternative method that is both specific in content to individual classes and allows comparison across classes. (...)
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  17. What Can We Learn by Looking for the First Code of Professional Ethics?Michael Davis - 2003 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 24 (5):433-454.
    The first code of professional ethics must: (1)be a code of ethics; (2) apply to members of a profession; (3) apply to allmembers of that profession; and (4) apply only to members of that profession. The value of these criteria depends on how we define “code”, “ethics”, and “profession”, terms the literature on professions has defined in many ways. This paper applies one set of definitions of “code”, “ethics”, and “profession” to a part of what we now know of the (...)
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  18.  46
    Ethics, Finance, and Automation: A Preliminary Survey of Problems in High Frequency Trading. [REVIEW]Michael Davis, Andrew Kumiega & Ben Van Vliet - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):851-874.
    All of finance is now automated, most notably high frequency trading. This paper examines the ethical implications of this fact. As automation is an interdisciplinary endeavor, we argue that the interfaces between the respective disciplines can lead to conflicting ethical perspectives; we also argue that existing disciplinary standards do not pay enough attention to the ethical problems automation generates. Conflicting perspectives undermine the protection those who rely on trading should have. Ethics in finance can be expanded to include organizational and (...)
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  19.  6
    Terrorists Are Just Patients.Michael Davis - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (10):56-57.
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  20.  19
    Twenty-Five Years of Ethics Across the Curriculum.Michael Davis, Elisabeth Hildt & Kelly Laas - 2016 - Teaching Ethics 16 (1):55-74.
    After twenty-five years of integrating ethics across the curriculum at the Illinois Institute of Technology, the Center for the Study of Ethics in the Professions conducted a survey of full-time faculty to investigate: a) what ethical topics faculty thought students from their discipline should be aware of when they graduate, b) how widely ethics is currently being taught at the undergraduate and graduate level, c) what ethical topics are being covered in these courses, and d) what teaching methods are being (...)
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  21.  29
    Better Communication Between Engineers and Managers.Michael Davis - 1997 - Science and Engineering Ethics 3 (2):171-212.
    This article is concerned with ways better communication between engineers and their managers might help prevent engineers being faced with some of the ethical problems that make up the typical course in engineering ethics. Beginning with observations concerning the Challenger disaster, the article moves on to report results of empirical research on the way technical communication breaks down, or doesn’t break down, between engineers and managers. The article concludes with nine recommendations for organizational change to help prevent communications breakdown.
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  22.  34
    Ethics, Finance, and Automation: A Preliminary Survey of Problems in High Frequency Trading. [REVIEW]Michael Davis, Andrew Kumiega & Ben Vliet - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):851-874.
    All of finance is now automated, most notably high frequency trading. This paper examines the ethical implications of this fact. As automation is an interdisciplinary endeavor, we argue that the interfaces between the respective disciplines can lead to conflicting ethical perspectives; we also argue that existing disciplinary standards do not pay enough attention to the ethical problems automation generates. Conflicting perspectives undermine the protection those who rely on trading should have. Ethics in finance can be expanded to include organizational and (...)
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  23. Some Paradoxes of Whistleblowing.Michael Davis - 1996 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 15 (1):3-19.
  24.  60
    Developing and Using Cases to Teach Practical Ethics.Michael Davis - 1997 - Teaching Philosophy 20 (4):353-385.
    While there is much extant literature on “case method” pedagogy as practiced in law and business education, there is little written on its use in teaching practical ethics. After relating the history and nature of the case method in law, business, and philosophy, the author offers guidance on how to develop and use philosophy cases, focusing on lesson plans for their presentation, their purpose within the practical ethics curriculum, and how to write and grade course requirements involving them. Much more (...)
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  25.  38
    Is Engineering a Profession Everywhere?Michael Davis - 2009 - Philosophia 37 (2):211-225.
    Though this paper is mostly about a sense of “profession” common in much of the West, it explains how the term might apply in any country (especially how the profession of engineering differs from the function, discipline, and occupation of engineering). To do that, I have to explain the connection between “profession” (in my preferred sense) and another hard-to-translate term, “code of ethics” (in the sense it has in the expression “code of engineering ethics”). To understand engineering (or any other (...)
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  26.  10
    Punishment Theory’s Golden Half Century: A Survey of Developments From 1957 to 2007.Michael Davis - 2009 - Journal of Ethics 13 (1):73-100.
    This paper describes developments in punishment theory since the middle of the twentieth century. After the mid-1960s, what Stanley I. Benn called "preventive theories of punishment"—whether strictly utilitarian or more loosely consequentialist like his—entered a long and steep decline, beginning with the virtual disappearance of reform theory in the 1970s. Crowding out preventive theories were various alternatives generally categorized as "retributive". These alternatives include both old theories resurrected after many decades in philosophy's graveyard and some new ones. Only in the (...)
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  27.  6
    The Least Worst Death: Essays in Bioethics on the End of Life.Margaret Pabst Battin, Elliott D. Cohen, Michael Davis & Christine Overall - 1995 - Philosophical Quarterly 45 (181):545-550.
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  28. An Historical Preface to Engineering Ethics.Michael Davis - 1995 - Science and Engineering Ethics 1 (1):33-48.
    This article attempts to distinguish between science and technology, on the one hand, and engineering, on the other, offering a brief introduction to engineering values and engineering ethics. The method is (roughly) a philosophical examination of history. Engineering turns out to be a relatively recent enterprise, barely three hundred years old, to have distinctive commitments both technical and moral, and to have changed a good deal both technically and morally during that period. What motivates the paper is the belief that (...)
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  29. Strasser on Dependence, Reliance, and Need.Michael Davis - 1986 - Philosophical Quarterly 36 (144):384-391.
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  30.  48
    Ethics Across the Curriculum.Michael Davis - 1993 - Teaching Philosophy 16 (3):205-235.
  31. “Global Engineering Ethics”: Re-Inventing the Wheel?Michael Davis - 2015 - In Eyad Masad, Jr Harris, Hassan Bashir, Paolo Gardoni & Colleen Murphy (eds.), Engineering Ethics for a Globalized World. Springer Verlag.
     
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  32. To Make the Punishment Fit the Crime.Michael Davis - 1995 - Ethics 105 (3):667-670.
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  33.  68
    Is There a Profession of Engineering?Michael Davis - 1997 - Science and Engineering Ethics 3 (4):407-428.
    This article examines three common arguments for the claim that engineering is not a profession: 1) that engineering lacks an ideal internal to its practice; 2) that engineering’s ideal, whether internal or not, is merely technical; and 3) that engineering lacks the social arrangements characteristic of a true profession. All three arguments are shown to rely on one or another definition of profession, each of which is inadequate. An alternative to these definition is offered. It has at least two advantages. (...)
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  34.  28
    Five Kinds of Ethics Across the Curriculum.Michael Davis - 2004 - Teaching Ethics 4 (2):1-14.
  35.  51
    What's Philosophically Interesting About Engineering Ethics?Michael Davis - 2003 - Science and Engineering Ethics 9 (3):353-361.
    What makes a subject philosophically interesting is hard-to-resolve confusion about fundamental concepts. Engineering ethics suffers from at least three such fundamental confusions. First, there is confusion about what the “ethics” in engineering ethics is (ordinary morality, philosophical ethics, special standards, or something else?) Second, there is confusion about what the profession of engineering is (a function, discipline, occupation, kind of organization, or something else?) Third, there is confusion about what the discipline of engineering is. These fundamental confusions in engineering ethics (...)
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  36.  16
    “Broader Impacts” or “Responsible Research and Innovation”? A Comparison of Two Criteria for Funding Research in Science and Engineering.Michael Davis & Kelly Laas - 2014 - Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (4):963-983.
    Our subject is how the experience of Americans with a certain funding criterion, “broader impacts” may help in efforts to turn the European concept of Responsible Research and Innovation into a useful guide to funding Europe’s scientific and technical research. We believe this comparison may also be as enlightening for Americans concerned with revising research policy. We have organized our report around René Von Schomberg’s definition of RRI, since it seems both to cover what the European research group to which (...)
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  37.  44
    Conflict of Interest.Michael Davis - 1982 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 1 (4):17-27.
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  38.  63
    The Usefulness of Moral Theory in Teaching Practical Ethics.Michael Davis - 2011 - Teaching Ethics 12 (1):51-60.
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  39.  4
    Reciprocity.Michael Davis & Lawrence C. Becker - 1988 - Philosophical Review 97 (3):432.
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  40.  19
    Nozick's Argument for the Legitimacy of the Welfare State.Michael Davis - 1987 - Ethics 97 (3):576-594.
  41.  39
    Rewarding Whistleblowers.Michael Davis - 2012 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (2):269-277.
    Since 2010, Section 922 of the Dodd-Frank Act has required the Securities and Exchange Commission to give a significant financial reward to any whistleblower who voluntarily discloses original information concerning fraud or other unlawful activity. How, if at all, might such “incentives” change our understanding of whistleblowing? My answer is that, while incentives should not change the definition of whistleblowing, it should change our understanding of the justification of whistleblowing. We need to distinguish the public justification of whistleblowing, its public (...)
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  42.  27
    Engineering Ethics: Looking Back, Looking Forward.Richard A. Burgess, Michael Davis, Marilyn A. Dyrud, Joseph R. Herkert, Rachelle D. Hollander, Lisa Newton, Michael S. Pritchard & P. Aarne Vesilind - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):1395-1404.
    The eight pieces constituting this Meeting Report are summaries of presentations made during a panel session at the 2011 Association for Practical and Professional Ethics (APPE) annual meeting held between March 3rd and 6th in Cincinnati. Lisa Newton organized the session and served as chair. The panel of eight consisted both of pioneers in the field and more recent arrivals. It covered a range of topics from how the field has developed to where it should be going, from identification of (...)
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  43.  26
    Professional Responsibility.Michael Davis - 1999 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 18 (1):65-87.
  44.  21
    Punishment as Language: Misleading Analogy for Desert Theorists. [REVIEW]Michael Davis - 1991 - Law and Philosophy 10 (3):311 - 322.
  45.  13
    Engineering Ethics in China.Hengli Zhang & Michael Davis - 2018 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 37 (1):105-135.
    This article describes China’s century-long concern with the professional ethics of engineers, especially a succession of codes of engineering ethics going back at least to 1933. This description is the result both of our own archival research and of “philosophical history”, the application of concepts from the philosophy of professions to the facts historians have discovered. Engineers, historians, social scientists, and philosophers of technology, as well as students of professional ethics, should find this description interesting. It certainly provides a reason (...)
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  46.  26
    Curricular Design And Assessment In Professional Ethics Education.Matthew W. Keefer & Michael Davis - 2012 - Teaching Ethics 13 (1):81-90.
  47.  29
    Rhetoric, Technical Writing, and Ethics.Michael Davis - 1999 - Science and Engineering Ethics 5 (4):463-478.
    Many outside science and engineering, especially social scientists and “rhetoricians”, claim that rhetoric, “the art of persuasion”, is an important part of technical communication. This claim is either trivial or false. If “persuasion” simply means “effective communication”, then, of course, rhetoric is an important part of technical communication. But, if “persuasion” has anything like its traditional meaning (a specific art of winning conviction), rhetoric is not an important part of technical communication; indeed, its use in technical communication would be unethical. (...)
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  48.  21
    Torture, Terror, and War: Justifying Exceptions to Ordinary Moral Decency.Michael Davis - 2012 - Journal of Military Ethics 11 (3):264-267.
  49.  56
    Setting Penalties: What Does Rape Deserve? [REVIEW]Michael Davis - 1984 - Law and Philosophy 3 (1):61 - 110.
    The paper is an application of the principle of just deserts (that is, retribution) to the setting of statutory penalties. The conclusion is that there should be no separate penalty for rape but that rape should be punished under the ordinary battery statutes. The argument has four parts. First, there is a description of the place of rape in a typical statutory scheme. Second, there is a consideration of possible justifications for giving rape the status it has in such a (...)
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  50.  15
    Introduction.Michael Pritchard, Taft H. Broome, Vivian Weil, Michael S. Pritchard, Joseph R. Herkert, Michael Davis & Taft Broome - 1999 - Science and Engineering Ethics 5 (4):541-567.
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