Results for 'Michael Duck'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  27
    Newton and Goethe on Colour: Physical and Physiological Considerations.Michael J. Duck - 1988 - Annals of Science 45 (5):507-519.
    Newton began his optical studies believing in the modification theory, which was still universally accepted at that time, and in the perception of colour as a physiological process—a process in which the eye responds differently to the different velocities of identical globules. His discovery that white light is heterogeneous led him to switch to considering colour in purely physical terms.A century later, Goethe started out by accepting Newton's physical theory. He soon abandoned it, however, finding modification to be more in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  2.  19
    A Question of Faith: Goethe's Belief in the Immutability of Light.Michael Duck - 1997 - Annals of Science 54 (4):397-406.
    Johann Wolfgang von Goethe was well acquainted with Isaac Newton's work on refraction and his theory of light and colours. Indeed, he had painstakingly repeated those experiments in Newton's Opticks , which clearly demonstrate that light is heterogeneous. Yet Goethe never abandoned his belief that light is immutable and that colours result from the interaction of light and darkness. It is argued here that the origin of Goethe's refusal to accept Newton's theory was not psychological, as is commonly supposed, but (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  3
    Philosophy of Education in a New Key: East Asia.Ruyu Hung, Peng Zhengmei, Morimichi Kato, Tadashi Nishihira, Mika Okabe, Xu Di, Duck-Joo Kwak, Keumjoong Hwang, Youngkun Tschong, Cheng-His Chien, Michael A. Peters & Marek Tesar - forthcoming - Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-16.
    Ruyu HungNational Chiayi University, TaiwanThis is a collective writing experiment of PESA members, orchestrating the Philosophy of Education in a New Key regarding East Asia. In 2016 the pioneerin...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  4.  14
    Commentary on Michael A. Peters’ Short Essay, ‘Socrates and Confucius: The Cultural Foundations and Ethics of Learning’.Duck-Joo Kwak - 2015 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 47 (8):755-757.
  5.  12
    Serial Reversal Learning in the Mallard Duck.Michael C. Wells & Philip N. Lehner - 1977 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 10 (3):235-237.
  6. Hume and Edwards on 'Why is There Something Rather Than Nothing?'.Michael B. Burke - 1984 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 62 (4):355–362.
    Suppose that five minutes ago, to our astonishment, a healthy, full-grown duck suddenly popped into existence on the table in front of us. Suppose further that there was no first time at which the duck existed but rather a last time, T, at which it had yet to exist. Then for each time t at which the duck has existed, there is an explanation of why the duck existed at t: there was a time t’ earlier (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  7.  58
    The Other Kind of Confirmation.Michael Strevens - manuscript
    It is argued that the relation of instance confirmation has a role to play in scientific methodology that complements, rather than competing with, a modern account of inductive support such as Bayesian confirmation theory. When an instance confirms a hypothesis, it provides inductive support, but it also provides two things that other inductive supporters normally do not: first, a connection to “empirical data” that makes science epistemically special, and second, inductive support not only for the hypothesis as a whole, but (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  33
    The Confucian Concept of Learning Revisited for East Asian Humanistic Pedagogies.Duck-Joo Kwak, Morimichi Kato & Ruyu Hung - 2016 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 48 (1):1-6.
    The term ‘humanism’ is Western in origin. It denotes the tradition that places special emphasis on cultivation of letters for education. In the West, this tradition was originated with sophists and Isocrates, established by Cicero, and was developed by Renaissance humanists. East Asia, however, also has its own humanistic traditions with equal educational relevance. One of these is a Japanese version of Confucian humanism established by Ogyu Sorai. This tradition is based on the interpretation of Confucius as a lover of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  9.  49
    The Duck's Leg: Descartes's Intermediate Distinction.Deborah Brown - 2011 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 35 (1):26-45.
  10. Gombrich and the Duck-Rabbit.Robert Eamon Briscoe - 2018 - In Michael Beaney (ed.), Aspect Perception After Wittgenstein: Seeing-as and Novelty. Routledge. pp. 49-88.
  11.  5
    Encounter of East Asian Educational Tradition with Western Modernity: The Korean Case.Duck-Joo Kwak - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 51 (9):895-899.
    Volume 51, Issue 9, August 2019, Page 895-899.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12. The Defecating Duck, or, the Ambiguous Origins of Artificial Life.Jessica Riskin - 2003 - Critical Inquiry 29 (4):599-633.
  13.  67
    Michael Huemer and the Principle of Phenomenal Conservatism.Michael Tooley - 2013 - In Chris Tucker (ed.), Seemings and Justification: New Essays on Dogmatism and Phenomenal Conservatism. Oup Usa. pp. 306.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  14.  27
    Reconsideration of Rorty's View of the Liberal Ironist and its Implications for Postmodern Civic Education.Duck‐Joo Kwak - 2004 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 36 (4):347–359.
  15.  41
    II—Michael Ridge: Epistemology for Ecumenical Expressivists.Michael Ridge - 2007 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 81 (1):83-108.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  16.  44
    Re‐Conceptualizing Critical Thinking for Moral Education in Culturally Plural Societies.Duck‐Joo Kwak - 2007 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (4):460–470.
    This paper critically examines the contemporary educational discourse on critical thinking as one of the primary aims of education, its modernist defence and its postmodernist criticism, so as to explore a new way of conceptualizing critical thinking for moral education. What is at stake in this task is finding a plausible answer to the question of how the teaching of critical thinking in moral education can contribute to leading young people to avoid moral relativism while at the same time to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17.  48
    I—Michael Smith.Michael Smith - 2004 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 78 (1):93-109.
  18.  5
    I–Michael Tye.Michael Tye - 1998 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 72 (1):77-94.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  19.  76
    Dreadful/Delightful Killing: The Contested Nature of Duck Hunting.Carmen McLeod - 2007 - Society and Animals 15 (2):151-167.
    Hunting ducks with a firearm has become increasingly contested in industrialized and urbanized contemporary societies. In southern New Zealand, an area that maintains strong connections to rural life ways, duck shooting is still a very popular activity. However, even duck shooters living in this region are increasingly finding that they must justify an activity their grandparents practiced without compunction. This paper considers ethical discourses associated with the killing of ducks, particularly the ways in which people who shoot ducks (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  20. Knowing and Being: Essays by Michael Polanyi.Michael Polanyi - 1969 - University of Chicago Press.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   43 citations  
  21.  15
    Externalism and Memory: Michael Tye.Michael Tye - 1998 - Supplement to the Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 72 (1):77-94.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  22. Causation and Responsibility*: MICHAEL S. MOORE.Michael S. Moore - 1999 - Social Philosophy and Policy 16 (2):1-51.
    In various areas of Anglo-American law, legal liability turns on causation. In torts and contracts, we are each liable only for those harms we have caused by the actions that breach our legal duties. Such doctrines explicitly make causation an element of liability. In criminal law, sometimes the causal element for liability is equally explicit, as when a statute makes punishable any act that has “ caused … abuse to the child….” More often, the causal element in criminal liability is (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  23.  29
    The Duck/Rabbit Hobbes.Patricia Springborg - 2006 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 14 (4):765 – 771.
    Once in a blue moon a book comes along capable of effecting a Gestalt Switch and Jeffrey Collin’s The Allegiance of Thomas Hobbes is just such a book. Here we have the duck/rabbit Hobbes, so long seen as an unmitigated Royalist, now exposed as an ardent Cromwellian.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  17
    The Rabbit and The Duck: Antinomic Unity in Dostoevskij, the Russian Religious Tradition, and Mikhail Bakhtin.Ksana Blank - 2007 - Studies in East European Thought 59 (1-2):21-37.
    At the core of Dostoevskij's philosophy and theology lies a concept according to which the Truth is antinomical: it contains both a thesis and its antithesis without expectation of synthesis. This concept can be traced to Eastern Patristics. After Dostoevskij, the theory of antinomies was elaborated by 20th century Russian religious thinkers such as Pavel Florenskij, Sergej Bulgakov, Nikolaj Berdjaev, Semën Frank, and Vladimir Losskij. Their ideas help us to understand that Dostoevskij's dialogism, made famous in its secular guise by (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  25. Choice, Character, and Excuse*: MICHAEL S. MOORE.Michael S. Moore - 1990 - Social Philosophy and Policy 7 (2):29-58.
    Freud justified his extensive theorizing about dreams by the observation that they were “the royal road” to something much more general: namely, our unconscious mental life. The current preoccupation with the theory of excuse in criminal law scholarship can be given a similar justification, for the excuses are the royal road to theories of responsibility generally. The thought is that if we understand why we excuse in certain situations but not others, we will have also gained a much more general (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  26.  7
    II—Michael Otsuka.Michael Otsuka - 2004 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 78 (1):151-166.
  27.  6
    The Implications of Arendt's Concept of Judgment for Humanistic Teaching in a Postmetaphysical Age.Duck-Joo Kwak - 2015 - Educational Theory 65 (6):681-697.
    In this essay, Duck-Joo Kwak draws on Hannah Arendt's concept of judgment in exploring what it means to teach the humanities as a form of values education in a postmetaphysical age. Arendt's concept of judgment is closely related to Ciceronian humanism, which is concerned with the wisdom to choose one's company while appreciating this pursuit itself, among men, things, and thoughts from the past and present. According to Arendt, this wisdom as a form of judgment can be generated from (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Teaching to Unlearn Community in Order to Make a Claim to Community.Duck-Joo Kwak - 2010 - Educational Theory 60 (4):405-417.
    In this essay Duck‐Joo Kwak explores a moral perfectionist approach to citizenship education, which is distinct from liberal and communitarian models. One of educational challenges to this approach is how to cultivate our students' sense of membership, which is shaped by a thick sense of the good life, while being not merely compatible with but open to the pluralist perspective. Kwak maintains that what is required for this form of membership to society or community is our future citizens' ability (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. How to Talk About Visual Perception? The Case of the Duck / Rabbit.Paweł Grabarczyk - 2014 - In Piotr Stalmaszczyk (ed.), Philosophy of Language and Linguistics: The Legacy of Frege, Russell, and Wittgenstein. De Gruyter. pp. 53-70.
    In Remarks on the philosophy of psychology Wittgenstein uses ambiguous illusions to investigate the problematic relation of perception and interpretation. I use this problem as a starting point for developing a conceptual framework capable of expressing problems associated with visual perception in a precise manner. I do this by discerning between subjective and objective meaning of the term “to see” and by specifying the beliefs which are to be ascribed to the observer when we assert that she sees a given (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30.  55
    The Rabbit and the Duck : Antinomic Unity in Dostoevskij, the Russian Religious Tradition, and Mikhail Bakhtin.Ksana Blank - 2007 - Studies in East European Thought 59 (1-2):21 - 37.
    At the core of Dostoevskij's philosophy and theology lies a concept according to which the Truth (Istina) is antinomical: it contains both a thesis and its antithesis without expectation of synthesis. This concept can be traced to Eastern Patristics. After Dostoevskij, the theory of antinomies was elaborated by 20th century Russian religious thinkers such as Pavel Florenskij, Sergej Bulgakov, Nikolaj Berdjaev, Semën Frank, and Vladimir Losskij. Their ideas help us to understand that Dostoevskij's dialogism, made famous in its secular guise (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  31. The Voice of Liberal Learning: Michael Oakeshott on Education.Michael Oakeshott - 1989 - Yale University Press.
  32.  26
    I—Michael Williams: Mythology of the Given: Sosa, Sellars and the Task of Epistemology.Michael Williams - 2003 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 77 (1):91-112.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  33.  5
    "Duck and Green Peas! For Ever!" Finding Utopia in Tasmania by Alison Alexander.Bill Metcalf - 2019 - Utopian Studies 30 (2):358-360.
    This book's quirky title and strikingly beautiful cover will grab attention on any bookshelf. The image comes from an old watercolor tourism advertising poster, dreamily evocative of paradisiacal pristine lakes and towering mountains. The title comes from a supposed quote by an early nineteenth-century female convict who declared that what would make her life perfect would be "Duck and Green Peas! For Ever!".1There is much to enjoy about this book. It is written in a nonacademic, at times humorous, manner; (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Perception, Knowledge and Freedom in the Age of Extremes: On the Historical Epistemology of Ludwik Fleck and Michael Polanyi. [REVIEW]Michael Hagner - 2012 - Studies in East European Thought 64 (1-2):107-120.
    This paper deals with Ludwik Fleck’s theory of thought styles and Michael Polanyi’s theory of tacit knowledge. Though both concepts have been very influential for science studies in general, and both have been subject to numerous interpretations, their accounts have, somewhat surprisingly, hardly been comparatively analyzed. Both Fleck and Polanyi relied on the physiology and psychology of the senses in order to show that scientific knowledge follows less the path of logical principles than the path of accepting or rejecting (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  35. Double Effect, Triple Effect and the Trolley Problem: Squaring the Circle in Looping Cases: Michael Otsuka.Michael Otsuka - 2008 - Utilitas 20 (1):92-110.
    In the Trolley Case, as devised by Philippa Foot and modified by Judith Jarvis Thomson, a runaway trolley is headed down a main track and will hit and kill five unless you divert it onto a side track, where it will hit and kill one.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  36.  64
    Skepticism and Education: In Search of Another Filial Tie of Philosophy to Education.Duck‐joo Kwak - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (5):535-545.
    As a way of participating in the discussion on the disciplinary nature of philosophy of education, this article attempts to find another distinctive way of relating philosophy to education for the studies in philosophy of education. Recasting philosophical skepticism, which has been dismissed by Dewey and Rorty in their critiques of modern epistemology, it explores whether Cavell's romantic interpretation of it can allow us to conceive of skepticism as an exemplary practice of education, especially internal to the learner. This opens (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  10
    "Duck and Green Peas! For Ever!" Finding Utopia in Tasmania.Bill Metcalf - 2019 - Utopian Studies 30 (2):358-360.
  38.  23
    Duck or Rabbit? Umberto Eco’s Structural Pragmatics.Valentina Pisanty - 2018 - European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 10 (1).
  39. Gloomy Duck or Cheerful Rabbit?Christine Tappolet & Bruce Maxwell - 2012 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (1):21-23.
  40.  27
    Duck-Rabbits, Hypotheses, and Perception.J. Carol Williams - 1978 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 16 (2):125-132.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  5
    Duck-Rabbits, Hypotheses, and Perception.J. Carol Williams - 1978 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 16 (2):125-132.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  83
    An Interview with Michael Walzer.Michael F. Shaughnessy & Mitja Sardoc - 2002 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 21 (1):65-75.
    Michael Walzer is currently at the School of Social Science, Institute for Advanced Study, in Princeton, New Jersey. Professor Walzer has written Just and Unjust Wars; The Revolution of the Saints and has edited Toward A Global Civil Society. In this interview, he discusses some of the current concerns about education, political theory and the current state of the art of toleration, and acceptance and accommodation of different racial, ethnic, social and minority groups. He has published extensively and his (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  43. Framing Cruelty: The Construction of Duck Shooting as a Social Problem.Lyle Munro - 1997 - Society and Animals 5 (2):137-154.
    Australia's Coalition Against Duck Shooting sees duck-shooting as a social problem and as an injustice with moral, legal and environmental consequences. The small animal liberationist group has succeeded in dramatically reducing the numbers of duck shooters in Victoria, which is the home of duck-shooting in Australia. The Coalition's framing work with the public via the electronic media involves three parts: a diagnosis , a prognosis and a motivational frame , all of which construct hunting as a (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  44.  15
    Michael Mann, "the Sources of Social Power". Volume I: "A History of Power From the Beginning to A.D. 1760".Barrington Moore & Michael Mann - 1988 - History and Theory 27 (2):169.
  45.  36
    Seminar with Michael Walzer 21 May 1999 — Institute of Philosophy — Faculty of Theology — K.U. Leuven.Michael Walzer - 1999 - Ethical Perspectives 6 (3-4):220-242.
    Bart Pattyn: Needless to say, we are more than pleased with the willingness of Michael Walzer to be here in Leuven. After the stimulating lecture yesterday we now have the opportunity to pose some questions to Michael Walzer in the same room where we talked with his friend, Harry Frankfurt, as well as with Bernard Williams. I have asked Professor Selling to moderate this discussion which I am sure he will do with a firm hand.Joseph Selling: We have (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  46.  68
    Science Friction: Phenomenology, Naturalism and Cognitive Science: Michael Wheeler.Michael Wheeler - 2013 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 72:135-167.
    Recent years have seen growing evidence of a fruitful engagement between phenomenology and cognitive science. This paper confronts an in-principle problem that stands in the way of this intellectual coalition, namely the fact that a tension exists between the transcendentalism that characterizes phenomenology and the naturalism that accompanies cognitive science. After articulating the general shape of this tension, I respond as follows. First, I argue that, if we view things through a kind of neo-McDowellian lens, we can open up a (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  47. Is Rule-Consequentialism a Rubber Duck?Brad Hooker - 1994 - Analysis 54 (2):92 - 97.
    Some things aren't what their names suggest. This is true of rubber ducks, stool pigeons, clay pigeons, hot dogs, and clothes horses. Frances Howard-Snyder's "Rule Consequentialism is a Rubber Duck" ("APQ", 30 (1993) 271-78) argues that the answer is Yes. Howard-Snyder thinks rule-consequentialism is a form of deontology, not a form of consequentialism. This thought is understandable: many recent definitions of consequentialism are such as to invite it. Thinking rule-consequentialism inferior to act-consequentialism, many philosophers, when discussing consequentialism, have had (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  48. Agent-Neutral Consequentialism From the Inside-Out: Concern for Integrity Without Self-Indulgence: Michael Ridge.Michael Ridge - 2001 - Utilitas 13 (2):236-254.
    Consequentialists are sometimes accused of being unable to accommodate all the ways in which an agent should care about her own integrity. Here it is helpful to follow Stephen Darwall in distinguishing two approaches to moral theory. First, we might begin with the value of states of affairs and then work our way ‘inward’ to our integrity, explaining the value of the latter in terms of their contribution to the value of the former. This is the ‘outside-in’ approach, and Darwall (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  49.  55
    Gombrich, Wittgenstein, and the Duck-Rabbit.William G. Lycan - 1971 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 30 (2):229-237.
  50. The Duck That Won the Lottery: 100 New Experiments for the Armchair Philosopher.Julian Baggini - 2008 - Plume.
1 — 50 / 1000