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  1.  23
    Sharing Economy, Sharing Responsibility? Corporate Social Responsibility in the Digital Age.Michael Etter, Christian Fieseler & Glen Whelan - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 159 (4):935-942.
    The sharing economy has transformed economic transactions, created new organizational forms, and contributed to changes in consumer culture. Started as a movement with promises of a more sustainable, democratic, and inclusive economy, the sharing economy, and its impact on issues such as privacy, discrimination, worker rights, and regulation, is now the subject of heated debate. Many of these issues root in the changes that digital technologies have brought and the unresolved moral and ethical questions emerging therefrom. This special issue contributes (...)
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  2.  35
    Social Media Policies: Implications for Contemporary Notions of Corporate Social Responsibility.Cynthia Stohl, Michael Etter, Scott Banghart & DaJung Woo - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 142 (3):413-436.
    Three global developments situate the context of this investigation: the increasing use of social media by organizations and their employees, the burgeoning presence of social media policies, and the heightened focus on corporate social responsibility. In this study the intersection of these trends is examined through a content analysis of 112 publicly available social media policies from the largest corporations in the world. The extent to which social media policies facilitate and/or constrain the communicative sensibilities and values associated with contemporary (...)
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  3.  16
    Measuring Organizational Legitimacy in Social Media: Assessing Citizens’ Judgments With Sentiment Analysis.Antonino D’Eugenio, Katia Meggiorin, Laura Illia, Elanor Colleoni & Michael Etter - 2018 - Business and Society 57 (1):60-97.
    Conventional quantitative methods for the measurement of organizational legitimacy consider mainly three sources that make judgments about organizations visible: news media, accreditation bodies, and surveys. Over the last decade, however, social media have enabled ordinary citizens to bypass the gatekeeping function of these institutional evaluators and autonomously make individual judgments public. This inclusion of voices beyond functional and formally organized stakeholder groups potentially pluralizes the ongoing discussions about organizations. The individual judgments in blogs, tweets, and Facebook posts give indication about (...)
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  4.  4
    Vicious and Virtuous Circles of Aspirational Talk: From Self-Persuasive to Agonistic CSR Rhetoric.Itziar Castelló, Michael Etter & Peter Winkler - 2020 - Business and Society 59 (1):98-128.
    Scholars are divided over the question of whether managerial aspirational talk that contradicts current business practices can contribute to corporate social responsibility. In this conceptual article, we explore the rhetorical dynamics of aspirational talk that either impede or foster CSR. We argue that self-persuasive CSR rhetoric, as one enactment of aspirational talk, can attract attention and scrutiny from organizational members. Continued adherence to this rhetoric, however, creates and perpetuates tensions that lead to a vicious circle of disengagement. A virtuous circle, (...)
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