13 found
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  1.  54
    Moral Action as Social Capital, Moral Thought as Cultural Capital.Min Ju Kang & Michael Glassman - 2010 - Journal of Moral Education 39 (1):21-36.
    This paper explores the idea that moral thought/reasoning and moral actions are actually two separate phenomena that have little relationship to each other. The idea that moral thinking does or can control moral action creates a difficult dualism between our knowledge about morality and our everyday actions. These differences run parallel to the distinction between social capital and cultural capital—where social capital is based on cooperation and trust and leads to purposeful solutions to real time social problems and cultural capital (...)
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  2.  22
    Capability Through Participatory Democracy: Sen, Freire, and Dewey.Michael Glassman & Rikki Patton - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (12):1-13.
    This paper explores possible important relationships and sympathies between Amartya Sen’s Capabilities Approach framework for understanding the human condition and the educational ideas of John Dewey and Paolo Freire. All three focus on the importance of democratic values in a fair, well-functioning society, while Sen and Freire especially explore the difficulties and possibilities of oppressed populations. Sen suggests that all humans have a right to choice in determining their life trajectories and should be provided with the tools that allow them (...)
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  3.  75
    Five Classrooms: Different Forms of 'Democracies' and Their Relationship to Cultural Pluralism(S).Michael Glassman & Min Ju Kang - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (4):365-386.
    This paper explores the issue of democracy and the role of the democratic classroom in the development of society in general, and the way in which educators understand and deal with diversity in particular. The first part of the paper explores different meanings of democracy and how they can be manifested in the classroom. We argue that the idea of a ‘democratic classroom’ is far too broad a category; democracy is defined in action and can have realist or pragmatic characteristics, (...)
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  4.  9
    Running in Circles: Chasing Dewey.Michael Glassman - 2004 - Educational Theory 54 (3):315-341.
    This paper explores the impact of John Dewey on the field of educational psychology. Dewey raised issues and ideas, such as the role of context and the reapproximation of knowledge, that would come to haunt education and psychology for the next century. And yet soon after the turn of the twentieth century, Dewey abandoned psychology and redefined his role in education. This paper traces some of the reasons behind the schism between Dewey and his ideas and the fields of education (...)
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  5.  10
    Mutual Aid Theory and Human Development: Sociability as Primary.Michael Glassman - 2000 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 30 (4):391–412.
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  6.  16
    Semiosis as an Educational Instrument: The Irrelevance of Mediation and the Relevance of Social Capital.Michael Glassman & Min Ju Kang - 2007 - Semiotica 2007 (164):81-99.
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  7.  12
    DeMOOCing Society: Convivial Tools to Systems and Back Again in the Information Age.Michael Glassman - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 51 (14):1413-1422.
    Since early development of information technologies, in particular computers and the Internet, there has been tension between those who believe these new technologies and their applications...
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  8.  17
    Replication or Reproduction?: Symbiogenesis as an Alternative Theory.Michael Glassman - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):537-538.
    This commentary takes issue with the idea that replication is a “fundamental element” in natural selection. Such an assumption is based on a traditional, mechanistic view of evolution. A symbiogenetic theory of evolution offers an alternative to traditional theories, emphasizing reproduction and qualitative development rather than replication and quantitative development. The issues raised by the symbiogenetic alternative may be extended to discussions of behavioral development.
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  9.  11
    The Dialectical Relationship Between Place and Space in Education: How the Internet Is Changing Our Perceptions of Teaching and Learning.Michael Glassman & Jonathan Burbidge - 2014 - Educational Theory 64 (1):15-32.
    In this essay Michael Glassman and Jonathan Burbidge explore the idea of a dialectical relationship between the traditional place(s) of teaching/learning settings and the challenges to our perceptions created by the new spaces of the Internet. The authors examine this topic in the context of a three-stage evolution of humans' relationship with new technologies: (1) fear of how new technologies will change our everyday actions, (2) recognition of emerging technologies as tools capable of offering new possibilities in our activities, and (...)
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  10.  12
    The Role of Trait Affiliation in Human Community.Michael Glassman & Cynthia K. Buettner - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):354-354.
    This commentary speaks to the relationship between Depue & Marrone-Strupinsky's (D&M-S's) concept of trait affiliation and affiliative memory and the formation of human community, especially among peer groups. The target article suggests a model for how and why dynamic communities form in a number of disparate contexts and under a number of circumstances.
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  11.  4
    Peer Exclusion: A Social Convention or Moral Decision? Cross-Cultural Insights Into Students’ Social Reasoning.Seung Yon Ha, Tzu-Jung Lin, Wei-Ting Li, Elizabeth Kraatz, Ying-Ju Chiu, Yu-Ru Hong, Chin-Chung Tsai & Michael Glassman - 2020 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 20 (1-2):127-154.
    In this study, we examined the role of culture on early adolescents’ social reasoning about peer exclusion. A total of 80 U.S. and 149 Taiwanese early adolescents independently completed a social reasoning essay about peer exclusion. Analyses of the essays based on social-moral theories showed that U.S. students tended to reason about peer exclusion based on social conventional thinking whereas Taiwanese students were more attentive to personal and moral issues. Despite this difference, both groups of students referred to some common (...)
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  12.  17
    Attachment Patterns of Homeless Youth: Choices of Stress and Confusion.Min Ju Kang & Michael Glassman - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (1):32-33.
    This commentary explores the reproductive strategies and attachment patterns among homeless youths. Del Giudice's integrated evolutionary model is applied to a homeless youth population that must function in ecological settings of constant high risk and stress. Different reproductive needs result in different patterns of high-risk behaviors. Intervention considering the sex differences, life history, and early caregiver–child relationships is suggested.
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  13.  11
    The Cultural Capital of the Moralist and the Scientist.Min Ju Kang & Michael Glassman - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (4):340-341.
    In this commentary we explore Knobe's ideas of moral judgments leading to moral intuitions in the context of the moral thought and moral action debate. We suggest that Knobe's primary moral judgment and the setting of a continuum with a default point is in essence a form of cultural capital, different from moral action, which is more akin to social capital.
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