12 found
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  1.  38
    Vulnerability: What Kind of Principle is It?Michael H. Kottow - 2004 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 7 (3):281-287.
    The so-called European principles of bioethicsare a welcome enrichment of principlistbioethics. Nevertheless, vulnerability, dignityand integrity can perhaps be moreaccurately understood as anthropologicaldescriptions of the human condition. Theymay inspire a normative language, but they donot contain it primarily lest a naturalisticfallacy be committed. These anthropologicalfeatures strongly suggest the need todevelop deontic arguments in support of theprotection such essential attributes ofhumanity require. Protection is to beuniversalized, since all human beings sharevulnerability, integrity and dignity, thusfundamenting a mandate requiring justice andrespect for fundamental human (...)
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  2.  46
    The Vulnerable and the Susceptible.Michael H. Kottow - 2003 - Bioethics 17 (5-6):460-471.
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  3.  13
    Whither Bioethics? A Reply to Commentaries on 'The Rationale of Value‐Laden Medicine' (Kottow 2002; Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 8, 77–84). [REVIEW]Michael H. Kottow - 2004 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 10 (1):71-73.
  4.  22
    Between Caring and Curing.Michael H. Kottow - 2001 - Nursing Philosophy 2 (1):53-61.
  5.  31
    Should Research Ethics Triumph Over Clinical Ethics?Michael H. Kottow - 2007 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (4):695-698.
  6.  34
    The Disease-Subject as a Subject of Literature.Andrea R. Kottow & Michael H. Kottow - 2007 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2:10.
    Based on the distinction between living body and lived body, we describe the disease-subject as representing the impact of disease on the existential life-project of the subject. Traditionally, an individual's subjectivity experiences disorders of the body and describes ensuing pain, discomfort and unpleasantness. The idea of a disease-subject goes further, representing the lived body suffering existential disruption and the possible limitations that disease most probably will impose. In this limit situation, the disease-subject will have to elaborate a new life-story, a (...)
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  7.  4
    The Rationale of Value-Laden Medicine.Michael H. Kottow - 2002 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 8 (1):77-84.
  8.  38
    Theoretical Aids in Teaching Medical Ethics.Michael H. Kottow - 1999 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (3):225-229.
    Medical ethics could be better understood if some basic theoretical aspects of practices in health care are analysed. By discussing the underlying ethical principles that govern medical practice, the student should also become familiar with the notion that medical ethics is much more than the external application of socially accepted moral standards. Professions in general and medicine in particular have internal values that command their moral virtuosity at the same time as their technical excellence. Three examples where clinical practice can (...)
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  9.  11
    Letter to the Editor: A Commentary on M. K. Wynia's “Consequentialism and Harsh Interrogations”.Michael H. Kottow - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (2):W36-W36.
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  10.  52
    Introductory Notes.Michael H. Kottow - 1988 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 9 (3):247-250.
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  11.  87
    Levels of Objectivity in the Analysis of Medicoethical Decision Making: A Reply.Michael H. Kottow - 1980 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 5 (3):230-233.
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  12.  8
    Why Huntington's Disease Isn't Unique.Michael H. Kottow - 1985 - Hastings Center Report 15 (4):33-33.