Results for 'Michael H. Miner'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  24
    Detecting, Preventing, and Responding to “Fraudsters” in Internet Research: Ethics and Tradeoffs.Jennifer E. F. Teitcher, Walter O. Bockting, José A. Bauermeister, Chris J. Hoefer, Michael H. Miner & Robert L. Klitzman - 2015 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (1):116-133.
    Internet-based health research is increasing, and often offers financial incentives but fraudulent behavior by participants can result. Specifically, eligible or ineligible individuals may enter the study multiple times and receive undeserved financial compensation. We review past experiences and approaches to this problem and propose several new strategies. Researchers can detect and prevent Internet research fraud in four broad ways: through the questionnaire/instrument ; through participants' non-questionnaire data and seeking external validation through computer information,, and 4) through study design. These approaches (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  2.  15
    European and American Philosophers.John Marenbon, Douglas Kellner, Richard D. Parry, Gregory Schufreider, Ralph McInerny, Andrea Nye, R. M. Dancy, Vernon J. Bourke, A. A. Long, James F. Harris, Thomas Oberdan, Paul S. MacDonald, Véronique M. Fóti, F. Rosen, James Dye, Pete A. Y. Gunter, Lisa J. Downing, W. J. Mander, Peter Simons, Maurice Friedman, Robert C. Solomon, Nigel Love, Mary Pickering, Andrew Reck, Simon J. Evnine, Iakovos Vasiliou, John C. Coker, Georges Dicker, James Gouinlock, Paul J. Welty, Gianluigi Oliveri, Jack Zupko, Tom Rockmore, Wayne M. Martin, Ladelle McWhorter, Hans-Johann Glock, Georgia Warnke, John Haldane, Joseph S. Ullian, Steven Rieber, David Ingram, Nick Fotion, George Rainbolt, Thomas Sheehan, Gerald J. Massey, Barbara D. Massey, David E. Cooper, David Gauthier, James M. Humber, J. N. Mohanty, Michael H. Dearmey, Oswald O. Schrag, Ralf Meerbote, George J. Stack, John P. Burgess, Paul Hoyningen-Huene, Nicholas Jolley, Adriaan T. Peperzak, E. J. Lowe, William D. Richardson, Stephen Mulhall & C. - 1991 - In Robert L. Arrington (ed.), A Companion to the Philosophers. Malden, Mass.: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 109–557.
    Peter Abelard (1079–1142 ce) was the most wide‐ranging philosopher of the twelfth century. He quickly established himself as a leading teacher of logic in and near Paris shortly after 1100. After his affair with Heloise, and his subsequent castration, Abelard became a monk, but he returned to teaching in the Paris schools until 1140, when his work was condemned by a Church Council at Sens. His logical writings were based around discussion of the “Old Logic”: Porphyry's Isagoge, aristotle'S Categories and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  7
    Using sound to solve syntactic problems: The role of phonology in grammatical category assignments.Michael H. Kelly - 1992 - Psychological Review 99 (2):349-364.
  4.  10
    A cognitive account of belief: a tentative road map.Michael H. Connors & Peter W. Halligan - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
  5.  50
    Delusions and theories of belief.Michael H. Connors & Peter W. Halligan - 2020 - Consciousness and Cognition 81:102935.
  6.  1
    Unless You Believe, You Shall Not Understand: Logic, University, and Society in Late Medieval Vienna.Michael H. Shank - 2014 - Princeton Legacy Library.
    Founded in 1365, not long after the Great Plague ravaged Europe, the University of Vienna was revitalized in 1384 by prominent theologians displaced from Paris--among them Henry of Langenstein. Beginning with the 1384 revival, Michael Shank explores the history of the university and its ties with European intellectual life and the city of Vienna. In so doing he links the abstract discussions of university theologians with the burning of John Hus and Jerome of Prague at the Council of Constance (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  7. Promising, Intending and Moral Automony.Michael H. Robins & N. J. H. Dent - 1986 - Mind 95 (378):268-272.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  8.  6
    Political Philosophers of the Twentieth Century.Michael H. Lessnoff - 1999 - Malden, Mass.: Wiley-Blackwell.
    This volume provides a critical survey of the major figures and ideas of 20th century political philosophy.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  9.  10
    New paradoxes of risky decision making.Michael H. Birnbaum - 2008 - Psychological Review 115 (2):463-501.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  10.  13
    A Selection of Greek Historical Inscriptions to the End of the Fifth Century B. C.Michael H. Jameson, Russell Meiggs & David Lewis - 1972 - American Journal of Philology 93 (3):474.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  11.  21
    Preservice Teachers’ Perception of Plagiarism: A Case from a College of Education.Michael H. Romanowski - 2022 - Journal of Academic Ethics 20 (3):289-309.
    Few studies examine plagiarism in a Middle Eastern context, specifically from the perspectives of preservice teachers. As future gatekeepers of academic integrity, preservice teachers need to understand plagiarism. This study surveyed 128 female preservice teachers in one university in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries. The survey explores preservice teachers regarding their understandings and reasons for academic plagiarism and their responses to particular scenarios. Findings indicate that preservice teachers have a thorough comprehension of plagiarism and suggest a lack of knowledge (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  12.  12
    Reflective Argumentation: A Cognitive Function of Arguing.Michael H. G. Hoffmann - 2016 - Argumentation 30 (4):365-397.
    Why do we formulate arguments? Usually, things such as persuading opponents, finding consensus, and justifying knowledge are listed as functions of arguments. But arguments can also be used to stimulate reflection on one’s own reasoning. Since this cognitive function of arguments should be important to improve the quality of people’s arguments and reasoning, for learning processes, for coping with “wicked problems,” and for the resolution of conflicts, it deserves to be studied in its own right. This contribution develops first steps (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  13.  7
    Taking Religious Claims Seriously: A Philosophy of Religion. Edited by Michael H. Mitias.Warren E. Steinkraus & Michael H. Mitias - 1998 - BRILL.
    _Taking Religious Claims Seriously_ is a systematic, critical, and comprehensive study of the fundamental questions of the philosophy of religion: religious experience, the existence and nature of God, religious knowledge and truth, good and evil, immortality of the soul, religious diversity, religious claims about the person, faith, and the religious way of life. In this study the author seeks to capture the reality and meaning of the religious as such: What is the foundation of religion? Under what conditions is an (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  10
    Philosophy and Architecture.Michael H. Mitias (ed.) - 1994 - BRILL.
    Contents: PART I: AESTHETICS OF ARCHITECTURE: QUESTIONS. Francis SPARSHOTT: The Aesthetics of Architecture and the Politics of Space. Arnold BERLEANT: Architecture and the Aesthetics of Continuity. Stephen DAVIES: Is Architecture Art? PART II: NATURE OF ARCHITECTURE. B.R. TILGHMAN: Architecture, Expression, and the Understanding of a Culture. David NOVITZ: Architectural Brilliance and the Constraints of Time. Michael H. MITIAS: Expression in Architecture. Ralf WEBER: The Myth of Meaningful Forms. Michael H. MITIAS: Is Meaning in Architecture a Myth? A Response (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  15.  88
    “Theoric Transformations” and a New Classification of Abductive Inferences.Michael H. G. Hoffmann - 2010 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 46 (4):570-590.
    Among the many problems posed by Peirce's concept of abduction is how to determine the scope of this form of inference, and how to distinguish different types of abduction. This problem can be illustrated by taking a look at one of his best known definitions of the term:Abduction is the process of forming an explanatory hypothesis. It is the only logical operation which introduces any new idea; for induction does nothing but determine a value, and deduction merely evolves the necessary (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  16.  22
    First-person experience cannot rescue causal structure theories from the unfolding argument.Michael H. Herzog, Aaron Schurger & Adrien Doerig - 2022 - Consciousness and Cognition 98:103261.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17.  18
    John Dewey’s Theory of Art, Experience and Nature: The Horizons of Feeling.Michael H. Mitias - 1987 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 46 (4):526-528.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  18. Kant and Consequentialism in Context: The Second Critique’s Response to Pistorius.Michael H. Walschots - 2021 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 103 (2):313-340.
    Commentators disagree about the extent to which Kant’s ethics is compatible with consequentialism. A question that has not yet been asked is whether Kant had a view of his own regarding the fundamental difference between his ethical theory and a broadly consequentialist one. In this paper I argue that Kant does have such a view. I illustrate this by discussing his response to a well-known objection to his moral theory, namely that Kant offers an implicitly consequentialist theory of moral appraisal. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19.  6
    Expertise and the representation of space.Michael H. Connors & Guillermo Campitelli - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
  20.  28
    Consensus Building and Its Epistemic Conditions.Michael H. G. Hoffmann - 2019 - Topoi 40 (5):1173-1186.
    Most of the epistemological debate on disagreement tries to develop standards that describe which actions or beliefs would be rational under specific circumstances in a controversy. To build things on a firm foundation, much work starts from certain idealizations—for example the assumption that parties in a disagreement share all the evidence that is relevant and are equal with regard to their abilities and dispositions. This contribution, by contrast, focuses on a different question and takes a different route. The question is: (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  21.  14
    Reflective Consensus Building on Wicked Problems with the Reflect! Platform.Michael H. G. Hoffmann - 2020 - Science and Engineering Ethics 26 (2):793-819.
    Wicked problems—that is, problems that can be framed in a number of different ways, depending on who is looking at them—pose ethical challenges for professionals that have scarcely been recognized as such. Even though wicked problems are all around us, they are rarely addressed in education. A reason for this failure might be that wicked problems pose almost insurmountable challenges in educational settings. This contribution shows how students can learn to cope with wicked problems in problem-based learning projects that are (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  22. Logical argument mapping: A method for overcoming cognitive problems of conflict management.Michael H. G. Hoffmann - 2005 - International Journal of Conflict Management 16:304-334.
    A crucial problem of conflict management is that whatever happens in negotiations will be interpreted and framed by stakeholders based on their different belief-value systems and world views. This problem will be discussed in the first part of this article as the main cognitive problem of conflict management. The second part develops a general semiotic solution of this problem, based on Charles Peirce's concept of "diagrammatic reasoning." The basic idea is that by representing one 's thought in diagrams, the conditions (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  23.  10
    Authenticity as self-transcendence: the enduring insights of Bernard Lonergan.Michael H. McCarthy - 2015 - Notre Dame, Indiana: University of Notre Dame Press.
    Michael H. McCarthy has carefully studied the writings of Bernard Lonergan (Canadian philosopher-theologian, 1904-1984) for over fifty years. In his 1989 book, The Crisis of Philosophy, McCarthy argued for the superiority of Lonergan's distinctive philosophical project to those of his analytic and phenomenological rivals. Now in Authenticity as Self-Transcendence: The Enduring Insights of Bernard Lonergan, he develops and expands his earlier argument with four new essays, designed to show Lonergan's exceptional relevance to the cultural situation of late modernity. The (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  9
    Of one-eyed and toothless miscreants: making the punishment fit the crime?Michael H. Tonry (ed.) - 2020 - New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
    Can punishments ever meaningfully be proportioned in severity to the seriousness of the crimes for which they are imposed? A great deal of attention has been paid to the general justification of punishment, but the thorny practical questions have received significantly less. Serious analysis has seldom delved into what makes crimes more or less serious, what makes punishments more or less severe, and how links are to be made between them. In Of One-eyed and Toothless Miscreants, Michael Tonry has (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  6
    Logical Argument Mapping: A cognitive-change-based method for building common ground.Michael H. G. Hoffmann - 2007 - Acm International Conference Proceeding Series; Vol. 280. Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Pragmatic Web.
    In this paper, I situate Logical Argument Mapping within.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  26. Analyzing Framing Processes in Conflicts and Communication by Means of Logical Argument Mapping.Michael H. G. Hoffmann - 1996 - In Das Problem der Zukunft im Rahmen holistischer Ethiken. Im Ausgang von Platon und Peirce. Edition Tertium.
    The primary goal of this chapter is to present a new method—called Logical Argument Mapping —for the analysis of framing processes as they occur in any communication, but especially in conflicts. I start with a distinction between boundary setting, meaning construction, and sensemaking as three forms or aspects of framing, and argue that crucial for the resolution of frame-based controversies is our ability to deal with those “webs” of mutually supporting beliefs that determine sensemaking processes. Since any analysis of framing (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  27.  8
    The 1903 Classification of Triadic Sign-Relations.Michael H. G. Hoffmann - 2001 - Digital Encyclopedia of Charles S. Peirce.
  28.  12
    Stimulating Reflection and Self-correcting Reasoning Through Argument Mapping: Three Approaches.Michael H. G. Hoffmann - 2018 - Topoi 37 (1):185-199.
    A large body of research in cognitive science differentiates human reasoning into two types: fast, intuitive, and emotional “System 1” thinking, and slower, more reflective “System 2” reasoning. According to this research, human reasoning is by default fast and intuitive, but that means that it is prone to error and biases that cloud our judgments and decision making. To improve the quality of reasoning, critical thinking education should develop strategies to slow it down and to become more reflective. The goal (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  29.  8
    Schizophrenia and visual backward masking: a general deficit of target enhancement.Michael H. Herzog, Maya Roinishvili, Eka Chkonia & Andreas Brand - 2013 - Frontiers in Psychology 4.
  30.  1
    Sources of Mass Political Disagreement: Rejoinder to Marietta.Michael H. Murakami - 2010 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 22 (2):331-354.
    Do people tend to disagree over political issues because of conflicting values? Or do they disagree about which policies will most effectively promote shared values? In a previous article, I argued that the issues most people think are most important tend to fall into the latter category. On the issues of greatest importance to the mass public, most citizens agree about the ends that are desirable, but disagree about which policy means would best effectuate those ends. Consequently, disputes about facts—disputes (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  31. Peirce's "Diagrammatic Reasoning" as a Solution of the Learning Paradox.Michael H. G. Hoffmann - 1996 - In Das Problem der Zukunft im Rahmen holistischer Ethiken. Im Ausgang von Platon und Peirce. Edition Tertium.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  32. Signs as Means for Discoveries. Peirce and His Concepts of 'Diagrammatic Reasoning,' 'Theorematic Deduction,' 'Hypostatic Abstraction,' and 'Theoric Transformation'.Michael H. G. Hoffmann - 1996 - In Das Problem der Zukunft im Rahmen holistischer Ethiken. Im Ausgang von Platon und Peirce. Edition Tertium.
    The paper aims to show how by elaborating the Peircean terms used in the title creativity in learning processes and in scientific discoveries can be explained within a semiotic framework. The essential idea is to emphasize both the role of external representations and of experimenting with those representations , and to describe a process consisting of three steps: First, looking at diagrams "from a novel point of view" offers opportunities to synthesize elements of these diagrams which have never been perceived (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  33.  12
    Facilitating Problem-Based Learning by Means of Collaborative Argument Visualization Software.Michael H. G. Hoffmann & Jeremy A. Lingle - 2015 - Teaching Philosophy 38 (4):371-398.
    There is evidence that problem-based learning (PBL) is an effective approach to teach team and problem-solving skills, but also to acquire content knowledge. However, there is hardly any literature about using PBL in philosophy classes. One problem is that PBL is resource intensive because a facilitator is needed for each group of students to support learning efforts and monitor group dynamics. In order to establish more PBL classes, the question is whether PBL can be provided without the need for facilitators. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  34.  15
    Plato’s Metaphysical Anti-Atomism.Michael H. Hannen - 2024 - Southwest Philosophy Review 40 (1):175-183.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. What Makes an Experience Aesthetic?Michael H. Mitias - 1991 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 53 (1):170-170.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  36.  8
    Drugmart: Heroin epidemics as complex adaptive systems.Michael H. Agar & Dwight Wilson - 2002 - Complexity 7 (5):44-52.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  37.  8
    Rich models.Michael H. Albert & Rami P. Grossberg - 1990 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 55 (3):1292-1298.
    We define a rich model to be one which contains a proper elementary substructure isomorphic to itself. Existence, nonstructure, and categoricity theorems for rich models are proved. A theory T which has fewer than $\min(2^\lambda,\beth_2)$ rich models of cardinality $\lambda(\lambda > |T|)$ is totally transcendental. We show that a countable theory with a unique rich model in some uncountable cardinal is categorical in ℵ 1 and also has a unique countable rich model. We also consider a stronger notion of richness, (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  38.  15
    Putting the ‘Art’ Into the ‘Art of Medicine’: The Under-Explored Role of Artifacts in Placebo Studies.Michael H. Bernstein, Cosima Locher, Tobias Kube, Sarah Buergler, Sif Stewart-Ferrer & Charlotte Blease - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11:501754.
    Physical environmental factors – or ‘artifacts’ – are linked to healthcare outcomes in the field of social psychology. However, the role of artifacts remains rarely examined in the burgeoning discipline of placebo studies. In this paper, we argue that a careful consideration of artifacts – such as provider clothing and office décor – may carry significant potential in eliciting placebo effects in clinical settings. We discuss three potential mechanisms by which artifacts may enhance or diminish placebo (or nocebo) effects: classical (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  39.  2
    Is Fishkins’s Critique of Impartial Consequentialism Impartial?Michael H. Robins - 1985 - Tulane Studies in Philosophy 33:21-26.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  46
    Transcendental Arguments in Scientific Reasoning.Michael H. G. Hoffmann - 2019 - Erkenntnis 84 (6):1387-1407.
    Although there is increasing interest in philosophy of science in transcendental reasoning, there is hardly any discussion about transcendental arguments. Since this might be related to the dominant understanding of transcendental arguments as a tool to defeat epistemological skepticism, and since the power of transcendental arguments to achieve this goal has convincingly been disputed by Barry Stroud, this contribution proposes, first, a new definition of the transcendental argument which allows its presentation in a simple modus ponens and, second, a pragmatist (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41.  7
    Transcendental Arguments in Scientific Reasoning.Michael H. G. Hoffmann - 2019 - Erkenntnis 84 (6):1387-1407.
    Although there is increasing interest in philosophy of science in transcendental reasoning, there is hardly any discussion about transcendental arguments. Since this might be related to the dominant understanding of transcendental arguments as a tool to defeat epistemological skepticism, and since the power of transcendental arguments to achieve this goal has convincingly been disputed by Barry Stroud, this contribution proposes, first, a new definition of the transcendental argument which allows its presentation in a simple modus ponens and, second, a pragmatist (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42. Kant’s Conception of Selbstzufriedenheit.Michael H. Walschots - 2018 - In Violetta L. Waibel, Margit Ruffing & David Wagner (eds.), Natur und Freiheit. Akten des XII. Internationalen Kant-Kongresses. De Gruyter. pp. 2249-2256.
    My aim in this paper is to clarify Kant’s conception of self-contentment, which is a particular kind of satisfaction associated with being a virtuous person. I do so by placing the term in the context of Kant’s answer to an objection made by Kant’s contemporary Christian Garve, namely the objection that if virtuous action is accompanied by a feeling of satisfaction, then virtuous action might only performed in order to experience this feeling of satisfaction . I begin by illustrating the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43. On greed: toward "concrete and contemporary guidance for Christians".Michael H. Taylor - 2016 - In Athena Peralta & Rogate R. Mshana (eds.), The greed line: tool for a just economy. Geneva, Switzerland: World Council of Churches.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  4
    Architecture and Civilization.Michael H. Mitias (ed.) - 1999 - Brill | Rodopi.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45.  15
    Form and Function in the Congregational Mosque.Michael H. Mitias & Abdullah Al Jasmi - 2018 - Estetika: The European Journal of Aesthetics 55 (1):25-44.
    A large number of scholars have argued that a) Islamic architecture is hidden, in the sense that its interior is not articulated on the basis of its exterior; b) the form of Islamic buildings neither expresses nor embodies its function; and c) Islamic architecture is not tectonic or structural, but iconic in character. In this paper, we use Ernst Grube’s analysis of these three claims and focus our attention on the design of the congregational mosques. This paper presents informed arguments (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  3
    Hegel on the Art Object.Michael H. Mitias - 1980 - Proceedings of the Hegel Society of America 4:67-76.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. Hegel on the Art Object.Michael H. Mitias - 1975 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 56 (3):301.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Moral Foundation of the State in Hegel's Philosophy of Right : Anatomy of an Argument, coll. « Elementa, 34 ».Michael H. Mitias - 1985 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 175 (1):38-39.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. Moral Foundations of the State In Hegel’s Philosophy of Right: Anatomy of an Argument.Michael H. Mitias - 1984 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 48 (2):350-351.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  1
    On “On ‘Having’ a Poem”.Michael H. Mitias - 1973 - Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 4 (2):57-63.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000