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  1.  16
    Sophocles Trachiniae 419.P. T. Eden, A. Rijksbaron, W. M. Clarke, Martin Korenjak, Wendell Clausen, Ingrid A. R. De Smet, Oleg V. Bychkov & Michael Hendry - 1995 - Mnemosyne 48 (4):197-211.
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  2. Aeschylus, 'Eumenides' 188.Michael Hendry - 1998 - Hermes 126 (3):380-382.
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  3.  13
    A beastly love triangle? Seneca, Agamemnon 737–40.Michael Hendry - 2000 - Classical Quarterly 50 (01):317-.
  4.  7
    A beastly love triangle? Seneca, Agamemnon 737–40.Michael Hendry - 2000 - Classical Quarterly 50 (1):317-320.
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  5. A Hermetic Pun In Marcus Argentarius Xii Gp.Michael Hendry - 1991 - Hermes 119 (4):497.
     
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  6.  7
    Interpolating an isthmus: Juvenal 6.294–7.Michael Hendry - 1997 - Classical Quarterly 47 (01):323-.
    R. J. Tarrant has remarked that ‘Latin poets from Ovid onward...felt an almost irresistible urge to mention the Isthmus of Corinth wherever possible’,2 and A. E. Housman admitted to a similar, though less urgent, inclination to introduce the city of Corinth into the passage quoted: ‘inter 295 et 296 excidisse uidetur uersus cuius clausula fuerit Corinthus’. Corinth would, of course, be very much at home in this list of depraved and wealthy Greek cities, and would suitably head the list.
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  7.  20
    Is nothing gentler than wild beasts? Seneca, Phaedra 558.Michael Hendry - 1998 - Classical Quarterly 48 (02):577-580.
    Hippolytus' declamation on the progress of human depravity brings him from the invention of weapons to the climactic horror of stepmothers , after which he turns to the vices of women in general and Medea in particular.
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  8.  13
    Rouge and crocodile dung: notes on Ovid, Ars 3.199–200 and 269–70.Michael Hendry - 1995 - Classical Quarterly 45 (02):583-.
    In Ars Amatoria 3.267–72, part of a longer sequence which begins in 261, Ovid advises his female readers on how to conceal various physical shortcomings. Text and apparatus are quoted from Kenney's revised OCT: quae nimium gracilis, pleno uelamina filo sumat, et ex umeris laxus amictus eat; pallida purpureis tangat sua corpora uirgis, nigrior ad Pharii confuge piscis opem; pes malus in niuea semper celetur aluta, arida nee uinclis crura resolue suis;….
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  9.  14
    Two Conjectures in Ovid's Metamorphoses.Michael Hendry - 1992 - Classical Quarterly 42 (02):552-.
    In 4.621–6, Ovid describes Perseus' flight over the known world.
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  10.  11
    Three cruces in Juvenal1.Michael Hendry - 1998 - Classical Quarterly 48 (01):252-.
    A. E. Housman has written that the context of Juvenal 5.140 is ‘the most obscure in Juvenal’ . I am primarily concerned with the following five lines, but the entire passage , and its position in the poem, must also be examined.
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  11.  13
    Three cruces in Juvenal.Michael Hendry - 1998 - Classical Quarterly 48 (1):252-261.
    A. E. Housman has written that the context of Juvenal 5.140 is ‘the most obscure in Juvenal’. I am primarily concerned with the following five lines, but the entire passage, and its position in the poem, must also be examined.
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  12.  6
    Two Conjectures in Ovid's Metamorphoses.Michael Hendry - 1992 - Classical Quarterly 42 (2):552-555.
    In 4.621–6, Ovid describes Perseus' flight over the known world.
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  13.  40
    Three Propertian puns.Michael Hendry - 1997 - Classical Quarterly 47 (02):599-.
    Many readers of Mynors' commentary must have been mildly puzzled by the last sentence of his note on 491: ‘Some sensitive modern ears catch an echo of the Homeric emathoeis, “sandy” and haima, “blood”’. In commenting on the same line, Thomas is less negative, but mentions only the blood, not the sand: ’Haemi … campos: given the force of pinguescere … V. surely intends a gloss—“plains of blood” ‘.2 He provides no further guidance as to who might be the owner (...)
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