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  1. Innate Talents: Reality or Myth?Michael J. A. Howe, Jane W. Davidson & John A. Sloboda - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (3):399-407.
    Talents that selectively facilitate the acquisition of high levels of skill are said to be present in some children but not others. The evidence for this includes biological correlates of specific abilities, certain rare abilities in autistic savants, and the seemingly spontaneous emergence of exceptional abilities in young children, but there is also contrary evidence indicating an absence of early precursors of high skill levels. An analysis of positive and negative evidence and arguments suggests that differences in early experiences, preferences, (...)
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    Peer Reviewing: Improve or Be Rejected.Michael J. A. Howe - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (2):218-219.
  3.  40
    Natural Born Talents Undiscovered.Michael J. A. Howe, Jane W. Davidson & John A. Sloboda - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (3):432-437.
    This Response addresses eight issues raised in the commentaries: (1) the question of how innate talents should be defined; (2) relationships between the talent account and broader views concerning genetic variability; (3) the quality of the empirical evidence for and against the talent account; (4) the possible involvement of innate influences on specific abilities; (5) the possibility of talent-like phenomena in autistic savants; (6) alternative explanations of exceptional expertise at skills; (7) practical and educational implications of the talent account and (...)
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  4. A Teachers' Guide to the Psychology of Learning.Michael J. A. Howe - 1991 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    Of all topics within the psychology of education, learning is one of the most crucial. Yet in terms of practical texts likely to be of use to teachers, it is one of the most neglected. This book is a short, down-to-earth account of learning by children of the kinds of knowledge and skills they acquire at school. Though it does not aim to show teachers how to teach, it gives a highly practical account of learning, remembering and related processes. Some (...)
     
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