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  1. A Review of The Empirical Ethical Decision-Making Literature: 1996–2003. [REVIEW]Michael J. O’Fallon & Kenneth D. Butterfield - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 59 (4):375-413.
    This review summarizes and critiques the empirical ethical decision-making literature from 1996–2003. One hundred and seventy-four articles were published in top business journals during this period. Tables are included that summarize the findings by dependent variable – awareness, judgment, intent, and behavior. We compare this review with past reviews in order to draw conclusions regarding trends in the ethical decision-making literature and to surface directions for future research.
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  2. A Review of The Empirical Ethical Decision-Making Literature: 1996–2003. [REVIEW]Michael J. O’Fallon & Kenneth D. Butterfield - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 59 (4):375 - 413.
    This review summarizes and critiques the empirical ethical decision-making literature from 1996-2003. One hundred and seventy-four articles were published in top business journals during this period. Tables are included that summarize the findings by dependent variable - awareness, judgment, intent, and behavior. We compare this review with past reviews in order to draw conclusions regarding trends in the ethical decision-making literature and to surface directions for future research.
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  3. The Influence of Unethical Peer Behavior on Observers' Unethical Behavior: A Social Cognitive Perspective. [REVIEW]Michael J. O’Fallon & Kenneth D. Butterfield - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 109 (2):117-131.
    The relationship between unethical peer behavior and observers’ unethical behavior traditionally has been examined from a social learning perspective. We employ two additional theoretical lenses, social identity theory and social comparison theory, each of which offers additional insight into this relationship. Data from 600 undergraduate business students in two universities provide support for all the three perspectives, suggesting that unethical behavior is influenced by social learning, social identity, and social comparison processes. Implications for managers and future research are discussed.
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    Moral Differentiation: Exploring Boundaries of the “Monkey See, Monkey Do” Perspective. [REVIEW]Michael J. O’Fallon & Kenneth D. Butterfield - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (3):379-399.
    Research in ethical decision making has consistently demonstrated a positive relationship between others’ unethical behavior and observers’ unethical behavior, providing support for the “Monkey See, Monkey Do” perspective (e.g., Robinson and O’Leary-Kelly, Acad Manage J 41:658–672, 1998 ). However, the boundaries of this relationship have received little research attention. Guided by theory and research in interpersonal distancing, we explore these boundaries by proposing and examining “moral differentiation,” the set of individual and situational characteristics that affect the degree to which one (...)
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    Do Competitive Environments Lead to the Rise and Spread of Unethical Behavior? Parallels From Enron.Brian W. Kulik, Michael J. O’Fallon & Manjula S. Salimath - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 83 (4):703-723.
    While top-down descriptors have received much attention in explaining corruption, we develop a grassroots model to describe structural factors that may influence the emergence and spread of an individual's ethical behavior within organizations. We begin with a discussion of the economics justification of the benefits of competition, a rationale used by firms to adopt structural aides such as the 'stacking' practice that was implemented at Enron. We discuss and develop an individual-level theory of planned behavior, then extend it to the (...)
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    Do Competitive Environments Lead to the Rise and Spread of Unethical Behavior? Parallels From Enron.Brian W. Kulik, Michael J. O’Fallon & Manjula S. Salimath - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 83 (4):703 - 723.
    While top-down descriptors have received much attention in explaining corruption, we develop a grassroots model to describe structural factors that may influence the emergence and spread of an individual’s (un)ethical behavior within organizations. We begin with a discussion of the economics justification of the benefits of competition, a rationale used by firms to adopt structural aides such as the ‹stacking’ practice that was implemented at Enron. We discuss and develop an individual-level theory of planned behavior, then extend it to the (...)
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