8 found
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  1.  99
    How Well Do You See What You Hear? The Acuity of Visual-to-Auditory Sensory Substitution.Alastair Haigh, David J. Brown, Peter Meijer & Michael J. Proulx - 2013 - Frontiers in Psychology 4.
    Sensory substitution devices (SSDs) aim to compensate for the loss of a sensory modality, typically vision, by converting information from the lost modality into stimuli in a remaining modality. “The vOICe” is a visual-to-auditory SSD which encodes images taken by a camera worn by the user into “soundscapes” such that experienced users can extract information about their surroundings. Here we investigated how much detail was resolvable during the early induction stages by testing the acuity of blindfolded sighted, naïve vOICe users. (...)
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  2.  40
    Synthetic Synaesthesia and Sensory Substitution.Michael J. Proulx - 2010 - Consciousness and Cognition 19 (1):501-503.
    Visual information can be provided to blind users through sensory substitution devices that convert images into sound. Through extensive use to develop expertise, some blind users have reported visual experiences when using such a device. These blind expert users have also reported visual phenomenology to other sounds even when not using the device. The blind users acquired synthetic synaesthesia, with visual experience evoked by sounds only after gaining such expertise. Sensorimotor learning may facilitate and perhaps even be required to develop (...)
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  3.  11
    The Study of Blindness and Technology Can Reveal the Mechanisms of Three-Dimensional Navigation.Achille Pasqualotto & Michael J. Proulx - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (5):559-560.
    Jeffery et al. suggest that three-dimensional environments are not represented according to their volumetric properties, but in a quasi-planar fashion. Here we take into consideration the role of visual experience and the use of technology for spatial learning to better understand the nature of the preference of horizontal over vertical spatial representation.
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  4.  24
    Where Am I? Who Am I? The Relation Between Spatial Cognition, Social Cognition and Individual Differences in the Built Environment.Michael J. Proulx, Orlin S. Todorov, Amanda Taylor Aiken & Alexandra A. de Sousa - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  5.  11
    Synesthetic Hallucinations Induced by Psychedelic Drugs in a Congenitally Blind Man.Sara Dell'Erba, David J. Brown & Michael J. Proulx - 2018 - Consciousness and Cognition 60:127-132.
  6.  8
    Corrigendum: Where Am I? Who Am I? The Relation Between Spatial Cognition, Social Cognition, and Individual Differences in the Built Environment.Michael J. Proulx, Orlin S. Todorov, Amanda Taylor Aiken & Alexandra A. de Sousa - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  7.  6
    Crossmodal Processing and Sensory Substitution: Is “Seeing” with Sound and Touch a Form of Perception or Cognition?Tayfun Esenkaya & Michael J. Proulx - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39.
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  8.  6
    Auditory Scene Analysis and Sonified Visual Images. Does Consonance Negatively Impact on Object Formation When Using Complex Sonified Stimuli?David J. Brown, Andrew J. R. Simpson & Michael J. Proulx - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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