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  1.  72
    Rethinking Race: The Case for Deflationary Realism.Michael O. Hardimon - 2017 - Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.
    Many scholars and activists seek to eliminate “race”—the word and the concept—from our vocabulary. Their claim is clear: because science has shown that racial essentialism is false and because the idea of race has proved virulent, we should do away with the concept entirely. Michael O. Hardimon criticizes this line of thinking, arguing that we must recognize the real ways in which race exists in order to revise our understanding of its significance. Rethinking Race provides a novel answer to the (...)
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  2. Role obligations.Michael O. Hardimon - 1994 - Journal of Philosophy 91 (7):333-363.
  3.  53
    Hegel’s Social Philosophy: The Project of Reconciliation.Michael O. Hardimon - 1994 - New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press.
  4. The Ordinary Concept of Race.Michael O. Hardimon - 2003 - Journal of Philosophy 100 (9):437-455.
    The ordinary concept of race is important and poorly understood. The present article seeks to address this problem by providing a general answer to the question: What is the concept of race?
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  5. The Idea of a Scientific Concept of Race.Michael O. Hardimon - 2012 - Journal of Philosophical Research 37:249-282.
    This article challenges the orthodox view that there is and can be no scientifically valid concept of race applicable to human beings by presenting a candidate scientific concept of biological race. The populationist concept of race specifies that a “race” is a subdivision of Homo sapiens—a group of populations that exhibits a distinctive pattern of genetically transmitted phenotypic characters and that belongs to an endogamous biological lineage initiated by a geographically separated and reproductively isolated founding population. The viability of the (...)
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  6.  32
    Is culture essential to race?Michael O. Hardimon - forthcoming - Politics, Philosophy and Economics.
    I argue that culture is not essential to race by considering the strongest and most persuasive contemporary articulation of the view that culture is essential to race—that provided by Chike Jeffers I then argue for the possibility of conceiving of race without adverting to culture by presenting the minimalist conception of race I developed in Rethinking Race as an example of a conception of race that makes no reference to culture. I next show how the ancestry-related features of culture that (...)
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  7.  35
    Where Did Hegel Go Wrong on Race?Michael O. Hardimon - 2024 - Hegel Bulletin 45 (1):23-42.
    Where exactly did Hegel go wrong on race? Moellendorf helpfully tells us that Hegel's treatment of race begins systematically in the Philosophy of Subjective Spirit and that he went wrong philosophically in the use of the biological category of race. This is basically correct but requires precisification. This article considers why Hegel's category of race is not unambiguously biological. Race's biological status can be problematized from the standpoint of contemporary biology and from the standpoint of Hegel's system. The textual placement (...)
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  8. The concept of socialrace.Michael O. Hardimon - 2013 - Philosophy and Social Criticism (1):0191453713498252.
    Explication of the concept of socialrace: the concept variously refers to (1) a social group that is taken to be a racialist race, (2) the social position occupied by a particular social group that is a socialrace and (3) the system of social positions that are socialraces. Socialrace is distinguished from other more familiar forms of social construction. The sense in which socialrace counts as a race concept is explained. The advantages of the term ‘socialrace’ are discussed. The desiderata for (...)
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  9.  28
    Institutional Racism and Individual Responsibility.Michael O. Hardimon - 2020 - In Saba Bazargan-Forward & Deborah Tollefsen (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Collective Responsibility. Routledge. pp. 501-12.
    The individual officers of a social institution may not be racist and consequently not blameworthy for racism. On the other hand, the individual officers of such an institution may be racist and deserve blame for their racism. This chapter focuses on the special, idealized case of pure institutional racism in which all the individual office holders who participate in E-like institutions are free of racism. The attitude-independent model of institutional racism on which racist institutions can promote racial inequality in the (...)
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  10. Four Ways of Thinking about Race.Michael O. Hardimon - 2019 - The Harvard Review of Philosophy 26:103-113.
    This essay presents four ways of thinking about race. They consist of four related but distinct race concepts: the racialist concept of race, which is the traditional, pernicious, essentialist, and hierarchical concept of race; the concept of socialrace, which is the antiracist concept of race as a social construction; the minimalist concept of race, which is the deflationary concept of biological race that represents race as a matter of color, shape and geographical ancestry; and the populationist concept of race, the (...)
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  11. The project of reconcilation: Hegel's social philosophy.Michael O. Hardimon - 1992 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 21 (2):165-195.
    The central aim of Hegel's' social philosophy (the Rechtsphilosophie) is to reconcile his contemporaries--the men and women of the nineteenth century--to the modern social world. By "the modem social world" I mean the central social institutions of that era: the family, civil society, and the state. Hegel seeks to enable his contemporaries to overcome their alienation from this world by providing them with a philosophical theory that will reveal its true nature (PR, Preface sec. 14). "The project of reconciliation" is (...)
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  12.  53
    Is Racism Essentially Systemic?Michael O. Hardimon - 2023 - American Philosophical Quarterly 60 (4):369-380.
    A shift in popular discourse over the last few years makes it makes it tempting to think that the answer to the question whether racism is essentially systemic is yes. My argument, however, is that there are forms of racism—things that are properly counted as instances of racism—that are distinct from and independent of systemic racism. These include ideational racism, ideological racism, racism as antipathy, and racism as prejudice and bigotry. Systemic racism does exist and is not reducible to these (...)
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  13.  53
    Wallis Simpson was Wrong: Remarks on Joshua Glasgow’s A Theory of Race.Michael O. Hardimon - 2009 - Symposia on Gender, Race and Philosophy.
    Joshua Glasgow has written a wonderful book on race (Glasgow 2009). Thoughtful, clear, and provocative, it advances the discussion in significant ways. Space is limited so I hope I can be excused for restricting my comments to Glasgow’s assessment of my 2003 Journal of Philosophy analysis of the ordinary concept of race. The last thing I would want to suggest is that this exhausts the interest of his book; for that is certainly not the case. My remarks can be regarded (...)
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  14.  29
    Logic and Politics: Hegel’s Philosophy of Right. [REVIEW]Michael O. Hardimon - 1991 - Philosophical Review 100 (3):498-500.
  15.  30
    The Struggle for Recognition. [REVIEW]Michael O. Hardimon - 1997 - Journal of Philosophy 94 (1):46-54.
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