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  1. Political Legitimacy in Decisions About Experiments in Solar Radiation Management.David R. Morrow, Robert E. Kopp & Michael Oppenheimer - 2013 - In William C. G. Burns & Andrew Strauss (eds.), Climate Change Geoengineering: Philosophical Perspectives, Legal Issues, and Governance Frameworks. Cambridge University Press.
    Some types of solar radiation management (SRM) research are ethically problematic because they expose persons, animals, and ecosystems to significant risks. In our earlier work, we argued for ethical norms for SRM research based on norms for biomedical research. Biomedical researchers may not conduct research on persons without their consent, but universal consent is impractical for SRM research. We argue that instead of requiring universal consent, ethical norms for SRM research require only political legitimacy in decision-making about global SRM trials. (...)
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  2. The Ethics of Scientific Communication Under Uncertainty.Robert O. Keohane, Melissa Lane & Michael Oppenheimer - 2014 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 13 (4):343-368.
    Communication by scientists with policy makers and attentive publics raises ethical issues. Scientists need to decide how to communicate knowledge effectively in a way that nonscientists can understand and use, while remaining honest scientists and presenting estimates of the uncertainty of their inferences. They need to understand their own ethical choices in using scientific information to communicate to audiences. These issues were salient in the Fourth Assessment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change with respect to possible sea level rise (...)
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  3. Toward Ethical Norms and Institutions for Climate Engineering Research.David R. Morrow, Robert E. Kopp & Michael Oppenheimer - 2009 - Environmental Research Letters 4.
    Climate engineering (CE), the intentional modification of the climate in order to reduce the effects of increasing greenhouse gas concentrations, is sometimes touted as a potential response to climate change. Increasing interest in the topic has led to proposals for empirical tests of hypothesized CE techniques, which raise serious ethical concerns. We propose three ethical guidelines for CE researchers, derived from the ethics literature on research with human and animal subjects, applicable in the event that CE research progresses beyond computer (...)
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  4. A Physical Science Perspective on Disaster: Through the Prism of Global Warming.Michael Oppenheimer - 2008 - Social Research: An International Quarterly 75 (3):659-668.
    Global warming provides a useful frame of reference for examining the problem of disasters. This paper uses this frame to address three questions: What is a disaster, why do disasters matter so much, and how can we improve our capacity to avoid and respond to disasters. The concept of vulnerability to disasters has biogeophysical as well aspolitical and socioeconomic aspects. The gap between adaptive capacity on the one hand, and actual responses to disaster and the risk of disaster on the (...)
     
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  5. Science and Environmental Policy: The Role of Nongovernmental Organizations.Michael Oppenheimer - 2006 - Social Research: An International Quarterly 73 (3):881-890.
    Public debates on science as it intersects with environmental policy are distorted by interests with resources deployed to amplify aberrant points of view and government that too often misrepresents and dissembles. Strengthening the scientific capabilities of nongovernmental organizations would contribute to maintaining balance in the public debate. To improve the quality of participation by all interests, the scientific culture itself, which could provide a bulwark against misrepresentation, must become more inclusive.
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    Building a More Effective Global Climate Regime Through a Bottom-Up Approach.Bryce Rudyk, Michael Oppenheimer & Richard B. Stewart - 2013 - Theoretical Inquiries in Law 14 (1):273-306.
    This Article presents an innovative institutional strategy for global climate protection, quite distinct from, but ultimately complementary to and supportive of the currently stalled UNFCCC climate treaty negotiations. The bottom-up strategy relies on a variety of smallerscale transnational cooperative arrangements, involving not only states but sub-national jurisdictions, firms, and CSOs, to undertake activities whose primary goal is not climate mitigation but which will achieve greenhouse gas reductions as an inherent byproduct. This strategy avoids the inherent problems in securing an enforceable (...)
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