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  1.  12
    Erica von Essen & Michael P. Allen, Wild-But-Not-Too-Wild Animals: Challenging Goldilocks Standards in Rewilding.
    Rewilding is positioned as ‘post’-conservation through its emphasis on unleashing the autonomy of natural processes. In this paper, we argue that the autonomy of nature rhetoric in rewilding is challenged by human interventions. Instead of joining critique toward the ‘managed wilderness’ approach of rewilding, however, we examine the injustices this entails for keystone species. Reintroduction case studies demonstrate how arbitrary standards for wildness are imposed on these animals as they do their assigned duty to rehabilitate ecosystems. These ‘Goldilocks’ standards are (...)
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  2.  64
    Michael P. Allen (2006). Hegel Between Non-Domination and Expressive Freedom: Capabilities, Perspectives, Democracy. Philosophy and Social Criticism 32 (4):493-512.
    Hegel may be read as endorsing a republican conception of freedom as non-domination. This may then be allied to an expressive conception of freedom not as communal integration and non-alienation, but rather as the development of new powers and capabilities. To this extent, he may be understood as occupying a position between nondomination and expressive freedom. This not only informs contemporary discussions of republicanism and democracy, but also suggests a ‘capabilities solution’ to the otherwise intractable problem of the rabble. Key (...)
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  3.  3
    Erica von Essen & Michael P. Allen (2016). A Rabble in the Zoopolis? Considering Responsibilities for Wildlife Hybrids. Journal of Social Philosophy 47 (2):171-187.
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    Erica von Essen & Michael P. Allen (2016). The Republican Zoopolis: Towards A New Legitimation Framework for Relational Animal Ethics. Ethics and the Environment 21 (1):61-88.
    An alternative to the negative rights slant in animal rights, focusing on abolition and hands-off approaches, has now surfaced within critical animal studies. Indeed, Relational Animal Rights Theory lays a foundation for positive relations of care, mutuality and dependence between species. In so doing, the theory is sensitive to the multitude of ways in which human and non-human animals interact across shared territories. Perhaps the most fruitful development with RART is offered by Donaldson and Kymlicka, insofar as it extends a (...)
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  5.  4
    Erica von Essen & Michael P. Allen (forthcoming). Reconsidering Illegal Hunting as a Crime of Dissent: Implication for Justice and Deliberative Uptake. Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-16.
    In this paper, we determine whether illegal hunting should be construed as a crime of dissent. Using the Nordic countries as a case study where protest-driven, illegal hunting of protected wolves is on the rise, we reconsider the crime using principles of civil disobedience. We invoke the conditions of intentionality, nonevasion, dialogic effort, non-violence and appeal to parameters of reasonable disagreement about justice and situate the Nordic illegal hunting phenomenon at a nexus between conscientious objection, assisted disobedience and everyday resistance. (...)
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