22 found
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  1. Sacramental Signification and Ecclesial Exteriority: Derrida and Marion on Sign.Michael Purcell - 2009 - Studia Phaenomenologica 9:115-133.
  2.  17
    IJPR: Beyond the Limit and Limiting the Beyond. [REVIEW]Michael Purcell - 2010 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 68 (1):121-138.
    It is now almost 20 years since Janicaud’s critique of the ‘theological turn in French phenomenology’ (Janicaud 1991, 2000), with its emphasis on phenomenology and theology as two and never one. Yet since that time there been an explosion of phenomenologies which are, if not overtly, implicitly religious and phenomenology. Thus, we have phenomenologies of prayer, or love, or hope, and the possibilities of further phenomenologies. The challenge of these emerging phenomenologies is that there seems to be no noematic correlate (...)
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  3.  13
    The Ethical Significance of Illeity (Emmanuel Lévinas).Michael Purcell - 1996 - Heythrop Journal 37 (2):125–138.
    From inception to extinction, objective criteria regarding the defining characteristics of "personhood" are sought to justify responsibility. But, when we relate to others, what do we actually relate to? In The Ethical Significance of Illeity, L vinas's concept of illeity is used to argue that the responsibility owed to others flows not from an ability to comprehend the defining characteristics of "personhood" but from the fact that persons are ultimately "neutral" and beyond disclosure. Ethics should not be dominated by knowledge; (...)
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  4.  17
    Grace and the Experience of the Impossible.Michael Purcell - 1997 - Philosophy and Theology 10 (2):421-448.
    Karl Rahner distinguishes “the experience of grace” and “the experience of grace as grace.” How is the experience of grace to be understood? How is grace experienced? This article attempts to understand the experience of grace in terms of Maurice Blanchot’s thought of the impossible. “Human life is impossible,” as Simone Weil reflects. Blanchot, particularly through a reflection which echoes that of Levinas, seeks to reverse the relationship between possibility and impossibility. Whereas, for Heidegger, the subject is to be understood (...)
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  5.  16
    The Natural Desire for the Beatific Vision.Michael Purcell - 1995 - Philosophy and Theology 9 (1/2):29-48.
    The understanding of the human person as a natural desire for the beatific vision prompted fierce and convoluted debate between those who, like de Lubac, espoused la nouvelle théologie, and those who sought to maintain the standard view of the nature-grace relationship. This paper attempts to draw attention to the criticisms which Rahner addressed towards la nouvelle théologie, and to suggest that the distinction which Emmanuel Levinas makes between need (besoin) and desire (désir) offers a useful way of progressing the (...)
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  6.  2
    The Mystery of Death Alterity and Affectivity in Levinas.Michael Purcell - 1995 - New Blackfriars 76 (899):524-534.
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  7.  8
    For the Sake of Truth..Michael Purcell - 1997 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 71 (2):237-258.
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  8.  2
    On Hesitation Before the Other.Michael Purcell - 2007 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 60 (1-3):9-19.
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  9.  11
    On Hesitation Before the Other.Michael Purcell - 2006 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 60 (1/3):9 - 19.
    Hesitation is a phenomenological moment. One is disturbed when, unexpectedly, someone else is there. There is that sharp intake of breath which accompanies being taken by surprise, and even a suspension of time, before one exhales. The other person takes us by surprise and often jolts us out of self-complacency and self-contentment, but also introduces us and invites us into a situation of responsibility in which the ego is no longer for itself but for the other. This is declining subjectivity (...)
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  10.  7
    Liturgy: Divine and Human Service.Michael Purcell - 1997 - Heythrop Journal 38 (2):144–164.
    Liturgy has been the forum for the enactment of a diverse range of theologies, at times stressing the human, at times the divine. Following Emmanuel Levinas, this article understands the meaning of liturgy as ‘a movement of the Same towards the Other which never returns to the Same.’ Whether directed towards God, or expressive of human longing, the structure of liturgy is essentially ‘for‐the‐Other.’ This movement out of self is seen when one considers liturgy as the ‘work of the people,’ (...)
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  11.  9
    'Levinas and Theology?' The Scope and Limits of Doing Theology with Levinas.Michael Purcell - 2003 - Heythrop Journal 44 (4):468–479.
  12.  2
    An Agape of Eating.Michael Purcell - 2013 - Bijdragen 57 (3):318-336.
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  13.  7
    Leashing God with Levinas: Tracing a Trinity with Levinas.Michael Purcell - 1999 - Heythrop Journal 40 (3):301–318.
    Levinas' ethical metaphysics opens up a nexus of relationships, in the midst of which God becomes accessible as the counterpart of the justice I render to others. Although Levinas refuses a theorising theology which does violence to God, we attempt in this article nonetheless to glimpse the possibility of a divine threesome which can be articulated in the language of ethical metaphysics. We seek to trace a Trinity, not in Levinas, but with Levinas. We seek to ‘leash God with Levinas.’Thus, (...)
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  14.  2
    The Prevenience and Phenomenality of Grace, or, the Anteriority of the Posterior.Michael Purcell - 2010 - In Kevin Hart & Michael Alan Signer (eds.), The Exorbitant: Emmanuel Levinas Between Jews and Christians. Fordham University Press. pp. 966-981.
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  15.  2
    AnAgapeof Eating.Michael Purcell - 1996 - Bijdragen 57 (3):318-336.
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  16.  5
    The Absent Author: Maurice Blanchot and Inspiration.Michael Purcell - 1994 - Heythrop Journal 35 (3):249–266.
    But when you are handed over, do not worry about how to speak or what to say; what you are to say will be given to you when the time comes, because it is not you who will be speaking; the Spirit of your Father will be speaking in you.
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  17.  1
    For the Sake of Truth... The Demand of Discontinuity in Foucault, Blanchot and Levinas.Michael Purcell - 1997 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 71 (2):237-258.
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  18.  3
    On the Ethical Nature of Priesthood.Michael Purcell - 1998 - Heythrop Journal 39 (3):298–313.
    This article argues that ministerial priesthood, rather than being ontologically comprehended, should be ethically articulated. The ‘character’ of priesthood is to be ‘for‐the‐other.’ Following a thought of Emmanuel Levinas on the ‘liturgical orientation of work,’ we argue that — Priesthood is essentially liturgical, in the sense of a movement out of oneself towards the other which never returns to the self. This movement is at one and the same time on orientation towards God, as divine other, and the other person. (...)
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  19. Agreement and Disagreements: Thomas Reid and Emmanuel Lévinas.Michael Purcell - 1997 - New Blackfriars 78 (912):66-75.
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  20.  7
    Levinas and Theology.Michael Purcell - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    Emmanuel Levinas was a significant contributor to the field of philosophy, phenomenology and religion. A key interpreter of Husserl, he stressed the importance of attitudes to other people in any philosophical system. For Levinas, to be a subject is to take responsibility for others as well as yourself and therefore responsibility for the one leads to justice for the many. He regarded ethics as the foundation for all other philosophy, but later admitted it could also be the foundation for theology. (...)
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  21. Quasi-Formal Causality, or the Other-in-Me: Rahner and Lévinas.Michael Purcell - 1997 - Gregorianum 78 (1):79-93.
    Le débat sur nature et grâce cherche à réconcilier théologiquement l'appel de la nature humaine à un accomplissement en Dieu sans compromettre en aucune façon la totale gratuité de la grâce. Rahner explique la relation entre les deux en termes de causalité quasi-formelle, par laquelle Dieu se communique à la créature tout en gardant sa transcendance et sa liberté. L'essence de Dieu «tient la place de la species dans l'esprit créé». Le langage de la causalité quasi-formelle reste, cependant, difficile a (...)
     
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  22. The Ethical Signification of the Sacraments.Michael Purcell - 1998 - Gregorianum 79 (2):323-343.
    Karl Rahner explique la causalité des sacrements en termes de la causalité du signe. Sacramenta significando efficiunt gratiam. La théorie de Rahner se prête à une interprétation ontologique dont le thème dominant est celui de présence. Derrida critique, cependant, le lien qui est établi entre signe et présence, en disant que «l'âge du signe est essentiellement théologique». La distinction entre sacramentum et res continue à être importante, comme Marion l'affirme, mais cela devrait se comprendre en un sens éthique plutôt qu'ontologique. (...)
     
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