4 found
Order:
  1. Rethinking Intuition: The Psychology of Intuition and its Role in Philosophical Inquiry.Michael Raymond DePaul & William M. Ramsey (eds.) - 1998 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Ancients and moderns alike have constructed arguments and assessed theories on the basis of common sense and intuitive judgments. Yet, despite the important role intuitions play in philosophy, there has been little reflection on fundamental questions concerning the sort of data intuitions provide, how they are supposed to lead us to the truth, and why we should treat them as important. In addition, recent psychological research seems to pose serious challenges to traditional intuition-driven philosophical inquiry. Rethinking Intuition brings together a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   188 citations  
  2. Rethinking Intuition: The Psychology of Intuition and its Role in Philosophical Inquiry.Michael Raymond DePaul & William M. Ramsey (eds.) - 1998 - Lanham: Rowman and Littlefield.
    Students and scholars in both fields will find this book to be of great value.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   61 citations  
  3. Intellectual Virtue: Perspectives From Ethics and Epistemology.Michael Raymond DePaul & Linda Trinkaus Zagzebski (eds.) - 2003 - Oxford University Press.
    The idea of a virtue has traditionally been important in ethics, but only recently has gained attention as an idea that can explain how we ought to form beliefs as well as how we ought to act. Moral philosophers and epistemologists have different approaches to the idea of intellectual virtue; here, Michael DePaul and Linda Zagzebski bring work from both fields together for the first time to address all of the important issues. It will be required reading for anyone working (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   53 citations  
  4.  7
    Resurrecting Old-Fashioned Foundationalism.Michael Raymond DePaul (ed.) - 2000 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    The contributions in this volume make an important effort to resurrect a rather old fashioned form of foundationalism. They defend the position that there are some beliefs that are justified, and are not themselves justified by any further beliefs. This epistemic foundationalism has been the subject of rigorous attack by a wide range of theorists in recent years, leading to the impression that foundationalism is a thing of the past. DePaul argues that it is precisely the volume and virulence of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations