Results for 'Michael S. Brownstein'

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  1.  14
    Implicit Bias and Philosophy, Volumes 1 and 2: Metaphysics and Epistemology.Michael S. Brownstein & Jennifer Mather Saul (eds.) - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Implicit Bias and Philosophy brings the work of leading philosophers and psychologists together to explore core areas of psychological research on implicit bias, as well as the ramifications of implicit bias for core areas of philosophy. Volume I: Metaphysics and Epistemology addresses key metaphysical and epistemological questions on implicit bias, including the effect of implicit bias on scientific research, gender stereotypes in philosophy, and the role of heuristics in biased reasoning. Volume 2: Moral Responsibility, Structural Injustice, and Ethics explores the (...)
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  2.  8
    Implicit Bias and Philosophy, Volumes 1 and 2: Metaphysics and Epistemology; Moral Responsibility, Structural Injustice, and Ethics. [REVIEW]Michael S. Brownstein & Jennifer Mather Saul (eds.) - 2016 - Oxford University Press.
    Most people show unconscious bias in their evaluations of social groups, in ways that may run counter to their conscious beliefs. Volume 1 addresses key metaphysical and epistemological questions on this kind of implicit bias, while Volume 2 turns to the themes of moral responsibility and injustice.
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  3. Philosophy’s other climate problem☆.Michael Brownstein & Neil Levy - 2021 - Journal of Social Philosophy 52 (4):536-553.
    Journal of Social Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  4.  58
    Philosophy’s other climate problem☆.Michael Brownstein & Neil Levy - 2021 - Journal of Social Philosophy 52 (4):536-553.
    Journal of Social Philosophy, Volume 52, Issue 4, Page 536-553, Winter 2021.
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  5.  13
    Mind as magic eight ball: A review of Kahneman, Sibony, and Sunstein’s Noise: A flaw in human judgment. [REVIEW]Michael Brownstein - forthcoming - Philosophical Psychology:1-5.
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  6. Conceptuality and Practical Action: A Critique of Charles Taylor’s Verstehen Social Theory.Michael Brownstein - 2010 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 40 (1):59-83.
    In their recent debate, Hubert Dreyfus rejects John McDowell’s claim that perception is permeated with "mindedness" and argues instead that ordinary embodied coping is largely "nonconceptual." This argument has important, yet largely unacknowledged consequences for normative social theory, which this article demonstrates through a critique of Charles Taylor’s Verstehen thesis. If Dreyfus is right that "the enemy of expertise is thought," then Taylor is denied his defense against charges of relativism, which is that maximizing the interpretive clarity of social practices (...)
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  7.  6
    Mind as magic eight ball: A review of Kahneman, Sibony, and Sunstein’s. [REVIEW]Michael Brownstein - forthcoming - Philosophical Psychology:1-5.
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  8. What do implicit measures measure?Michael Brownstein, Alex Madva & Bertram Gawronski - 2019 - WIREs Cognitive Science:1-13.
    We identify several ongoing debates related to implicit measures, surveying prominent views and considerations in each debate. First, we summarize the debate regarding whether performance on implicit measures is explained by conscious or unconscious representations. Second, we discuss the cognitive structure of the operative constructs: are they associatively or propositionally structured? Third, we review debates whether performance on implicit measures reflects traits or states. Fourth, we discuss the question of whether a person’s performance on an implicit measure reflects characteristics of (...)
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  9.  12
    The Normativity of Automaticity.Alex Madva Michael Brownstein - 2012 - Mind and Language 27 (4):410-434.
    While the causal contributions of so‐called ‘automatic’ processes to behavior are now widely acknowledged, less attention has been given to their normative role in the guidance of action. We develop an account of the normativity of automaticity that responds to and builds upon Tamar Szabó Gendler's account of ‘alief’, an associative and arational mental state more primitive than belief. Alief represents a promising tool for integrating psychological research on automaticity with philosophical work on mind and action, but Gendler errs in (...)
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  10. Doing without believing: Intellectualism, knowledge-how, and belief-attribution.Michael Brownstein & Eliot Michaelson - 2016 - Synthese 193 (9):2815–2836.
    We consider a range of cases—both hypothetical and actual—in which agents apparently know how to \ but fail to believe that the way in which they in fact \ is a way for them to \. These “no-belief” cases present a prima facie problem for Intellectualism about knowledge-how. The problem is this: if knowledge-that entails belief, and if knowing how to \ just is knowing that some w is a way for one to \, then an agent cannot both know (...)
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  11. The Normativity of Automaticity.Michael Brownstein & Alex Madva - 2012 - Mind and Language 27 (4):410-434.
    While the causal contributions of so-called ‘automatic’ processes to behavior are now widely acknowledged, less attention has been given to their normative role in the guidance of action. We develop an account of the normativity of automaticity that responds to and builds upon Tamar Szabó Gendler's account of ‘alief’, an associative and arational mental state more primitive than belief. Alief represents a promising tool for integrating psychological research on automaticity with philosophical work on mind and action, but Gendler errs in (...)
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  12. Ethical Automaticity.Michael Brownstein & Alex Madva - 2012 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 42 (1):68-98.
    Social psychologists tell us that much of human behavior is automatic. It is natural to think that automatic behavioral dispositions are ethically desirable if and only if they are suitably governed by an agent’s reflective judgments. However, we identify a class of automatic dispositions that make normatively self-standing contributions to praiseworthy action and a well-lived life, independently of, or even in spite of, an agent’s reflective judgments about what to do. We argue that the fundamental questions for the "ethics of (...)
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  13. Review of The Evolution of Moral Progress: A Biocultural Theory by Allen Buchanan and Russell Powell. [REVIEW]Michael Brownstein & Daniel Kelly - 2019 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science Review of Books 1:1-14.
    Allen Buchanan and Russel Powell’s The Evolution of Moral Progress (EMP) is likely to become a landmark. It adeptly builds on much of the recent empirical work, weaving it together with philosophical material drawn from a series of essays published by the two authors. EMP makes the case that moral progress is not only consistent with human psychology but—under some conditions—likely. At its heart is a careful, well-developed rebuttal to the idea that there are evolved constraints endogenous to human minds (...)
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  14. Taking social psychology out of context.Michael Brownstein, Daniel Kelly & Alex Madva - 2022 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 45:26-27.
    We endorse Cesario's call for more research into the complexities of “real-world” decisions and the comparative power of different causes of group disparities. Unfortunately, these reasonable suggestions are overshadowed by a barrage of non sequiturs, misdirected criticisms of methodology, and unsubstantiated claims about the assumptions and inferences of social psychologists.
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  15.  14
    The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III baryon oscillation spectroscopic survey: Baryon acoustic oscillations in the data releases 10 and 11 galaxy samples. [REVIEW]Lauren Anderson, Éric Aubourg, Stephen Bailey, Florian Beutler, Vaishali Bhardwaj, Michael Blanton, Adam S. Bolton, J. Brinkmann, Joel R. Brownstein, Angela Burden, Chia-Hsun Chuang, Antonio J. Cuesta, Kyle S. Dawson, Daniel J. Eisenstein, Stephanie Escoffier, James E. Gunn, Hong Guo, Shirley Ho, Klaus Honscheid, Cullan Howlett, David Kirkby, Robert H. Lupton, Marc Manera, Claudia Maraston, Cameron K. McBride, Olga Mena, Francesco Montesano, Robert C. Nichol, Sebastián E. Nuza, Matthew D. Olmstead, Nikhil Padmanabhan, Nathalie Palanque-Delabrouille, John Parejko, Will J. Percival, Patrick Petitjean, Francisco Prada, Adrian M. Price-Whelan, Beth Reid, Natalie A. Roe, Ashley J. Ross, Nicholas P. Ross, Cristiano G. Sabiu, Shun Saito, Lado Samushia, Ariel G. Sánchez, David J. Schlegel, Donald P. Schneider, Claudia G. Scoccola, Hee-Jong Seo, Ramin A. Skibba, Michael A. Strauss, Molly E. C. Swanson, Daniel Thomas, Jeremy L. Tinker, Rita Tojeiro, Mariana Vargas Magaña, Licia Verde & Dav Wake - unknown
    We present a one per cent measurement of the cosmic distance scale from the detections of the baryon acoustic oscillations in the clustering of galaxies from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, which is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. Our results come from the Data Release 11 sample, containing nearly one million galaxies and covering approximately 8500 square degrees and the redshift range 0.2 < z < 0.7. We also compare these results with those from the publicly released (...)
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  16. Causation and Responsibility*: MICHAEL S. MOORE.Michael S. Moore - 1999 - Social Philosophy and Policy 16 (2):1-51.
    In various areas of Anglo-American law, legal liability turns on causation. In torts and contracts, we are each liable only for those harms we have caused by the actions that breach our legal duties. Such doctrines explicitly make causation an element of liability. In criminal law, sometimes the causal element for liability is equally explicit, as when a statute makes punishable any act that has “ caused … abuse to the child….” More often, the causal element in criminal liability is (...)
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  17. Choice, Character, and Excuse*: MICHAEL S. MOORE.Michael S. Moore - 1990 - Social Philosophy and Policy 7 (2):29-58.
    Freud justified his extensive theorizing about dreams by the observation that they were “the royal road” to something much more general: namely, our unconscious mental life. The current preoccupation with the theory of excuse in criminal law scholarship can be given a similar justification, for the excuses are the royal road to theories of responsibility generally. The thought is that if we understand why we excuse in certain situations but not others, we will have also gained a much more general (...)
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  18.  44
    The Gettier problem and legal proof: Michael S. Pardo.Michael S. Pardo - 2010 - Legal Theory 16 (1):37-57.
    This article explores the relationships between legal proof and fundamental epistemic concepts such as knowledge and justification. A survey of the legal literature reveals a confusing array of seemingly inconsistent proposals and presuppositions regarding these relationships. This article makes two contributions. First, it reconciles a number of apparent inconsistencies and tensions in accounts of the epistemology of legal proof. Second, it argues that there is a deeper connection between knowledge and legal proof than is typically argued for or presupposed in (...)
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  19.  54
    John Martin Fischer's The Metaphysics of Free Will: An Essay on Control: Michael S. McKenna.Michael S. McKenna - 1997 - Legal Theory 3 (4):379-397.
    John Martin Fischer's The Metaphysics of Free Will is devoted to two major projects. First, Fischer defends the thesis that determinism is incompatible with a person's control over alternatives to the actual future. Second, Fischer defends the striking thesis that such control is not necessary for moral responsibility. This review essay examines Fischer's arguments for each thesis. Fischer's defense of the incompatibilist thesis is the most innovative to date, and I argue that his formulation restructures the free will debate. To (...)
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  20. R. S. Peters' Normative Conception of Education and Educational Aims.Michael S. Katz - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (s1):97-108.
    This article aims to highlight why R. S. Peters' conceptual analysis of ‘education’ was such an important contribution to the normative field of philosophy of education. In the article, I do the following: 1) explicate Peters' conception of philosophy of education as a field of philosophy and explain his approach to the philosophical analysis of concepts; 2) emphasize several (normative) features of Peters' conception of education, while pointing to a couple of oversights; and 3) suggest how Peters' analysis might be (...)
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  21. Mill's moral theory and the problem of preference change.Michael S. McPherson - 1982 - Ethics 92 (2):252-273.
    A reconsideration of mill's theory of "higher pleasures," construed as a way of evaluating changes in preferences or character that result from changes in social environment. mill's account is criticized and partly reconstructed in light of modern preference theory, but viewed favorably as an illuminating attempt to address a fundamental problem in moral evaluation of social institutions. mill's advocacy of the higher pleasures is defended in particular against the charge that it is incompatible with his commitment to liberty.
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  22.  19
    Michael’s Story or the Paradox of Normalcy.Michael Kreuzer - 2015 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 5 (2):E7-E10.
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  23.  32
    Michael S. Hogue: The promise of religious naturalism: Rowman & Littlefield, Lanham, MD, 2010, xxx + 252 pp., $74.95. [REVIEW]Michael L. Raposa - 2012 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 72 (1):59-62.
  24.  9
    Darwin's vertical thinking: Mountains, mobility, and the imagination in 19th‐century geology.Michael S. Reidy - 2020 - Centaurus 62 (4):631-646.
    Like other aspiring geologists in the 1830s, Darwin focused heavily on the rising and falling of the earth's crust. I use his time in the Andes to underscore the importance he placed on larger questions of vertical movement, which mountains helped to solidify in his mind. His most impressive ramblings occurred in 1835 on two high passes in the Andes. Prior to his upland journey, he was well prepared to see the gradual movement of the earth's crust, but his time (...)
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  25.  87
    Moore’s Truths About Causation and Responsibility: A Reply to Alexander and Ferzan. [REVIEW]Michael S. Moore - 2012 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 6 (3):445-462.
    In this response to the review of Moore, Causation and Responsibility, by Larry Alexander and Kimberly Ferzan, previously published in this journal, two issues are discussed. The first is whether causation, counterfactual dependence, moral blame, and culpability, are all scalar properties or relations, that is, matters of more-or-less rather than either-or. The second issue discussed is whether deontological moral obligation is best described as a prohibition against using another as a means, or rather, as a prohibition on an agent strongly (...)
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  26.  16
    Relating Neuroscience to Responsibility: Comments on Hirstein, Sifferd, and Fagan’s Responsible Brains.Michael S. Moore - 2022 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 16 (2):283-298.
    The article explores the agreements and disagreements between the author and the authors of Responsible Brains on how neuroscience relates to moral responsibility. The agreements are fundamental: neuroscience is not the harbinger of revolutionary revision of our views of when persons are morally responsible for the harms that they cause. The disagreements are in the details of what is needed for neuroscience to be the helper of the moral sciences.
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  27.  14
    Men's responses to feminism at the turn of the century.Michael S. Kimmel - 1987 - Gender and Society 1 (3):261-283.
    This article examines the variety of men's responses to feminism in late nineteenthand early twentieth-century United States through texts that addressed the claims raised by the turn-of-the-century women's movements. Antifeminist texts relied on traditional arguments, as well as Social Darwinist and natural law notions, to reassert the patriarchal family and to oppose women's suffrage and participation in the public sphere. Masculinist texts sought to combat the purported feminization of American manhood by proposing islands of masculinity, untainted by feminizing forces; proscribed (...)
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  28.  30
    On Hart's category mistake.Michael S. Green - 2013 - Legal Theory 19 (4):347-369.
    This essay concerns Scott Shapiro's criticism that H.L.A. Hart's theory of law suffers from a Although other philosophers of law have summarily dismissed Shapiro's criticism, I argue that it identifies an important requirement for an adequate theory of law. Such a theory must explain why legal officials justify their actions by reference to abstract propositional entities, instead of pointing to the existence of social practices. A virtue of Shapiro's planning theory of law is that it can explain this phenomenon. Despite (...)
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  29.  40
    Foucault's "History of the Present".Michael S. Roth - 1981 - History and Theory 20 (1):32-46.
    In The Birth of the Clinic, The Order of Things, and Discipline and Punish, Foucault writes a "history of the present" by showing the connections between the archaeology of knowledge and criticism. In the first, he is fundamentally concerned with the changes in human perception evident at the end of the eighteenth century and the relation of these changes to the fundamental structures of experience. Underlying the history of medicine is the moral and political attempt to link the development of (...)
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  30.  28
    Author's personal copy.Michael S. North - unknown
    The present study investigates whether people can infer the preferences of others from spontaneous facial expressions alone. We utilize a paradigm that unobtrusively records people's natural facial reactions to relatively mundane stimuli while they simultaneously report which ones they find more appealing. Videos were then presented to perceivers who attempted to infer the choices of the target individuals—thereby linking perceiver inferences to objective outcomes. Perceivers demonstrated above-chance ability to infer target preferences across four different stimulus categories: people (attractiveness), cartoons (humor), (...)
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  31.  17
    Libet's Challenge (s) to Responsible Agency.Michael S. Moore - 2010 - In Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Lynn Nadel (eds.), Conscious Will and Responsibility: A Tribute to Benjamin Libet. Oup Usa. pp. 207.
  32.  11
    The Mutability of Biotechnology Patents: From Unwieldy Products of Nature to Independent 'Object/s'.Michael S. Carolan - 2010 - Theory, Culture and Society 27 (1):110-129.
    This article details how patent law works to create discrete, immutable biological ‘objects’. This socio-legal maneuver is necessary to distinguish these artifacts from the unwieldy realm of the natural world. The creation of ‘objects’ also serves the interests of capital, where a stable, unchanging, immutable object goes hand in hand with commodification. Yet this stabilization is incomplete. Pointing to a variety of different examples, this article illustrates how biotech patents do not speak to specific, immutable things. Biotech patents, rather, are (...)
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  33.  23
    The Ethics of Care and Empathy, by Michael Slote.The Impossibility of Perfection: Aristotle, Feminism, and the Complexities of Ethics, by Michael Slote.Michael S. Brady - 2015 - Mind 124 (495):980-988.
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  34.  52
    Rawls’s Moral Psychology.Michael S. Pritchard - 1977 - Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 8 (1):59-72.
  35.  35
    God’s Rivals: Why Has God Allowed Different Religions? Insights from the Bible and the Early Church. [REVIEW]Michael S. Jones - 2010 - Philosophia Christi 12 (1):239-242.
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  36.  2
    Safe Enough Spaces: A Pragmatist’s Approach to Inclusion, Free Speech, and Political Correctness on College Campuses.Michael S. Roth - 2019 - Yale University Press.
    _From the president of Wesleyan University, a compassionate and provocative manifesto on the crises confronting higher education_ In this bracing book, Michael S. Roth stakes out a pragmatist path through the thicket of issues facing colleges today to carry out the mission of higher education. With great empathy, candor, subtlety, and insight, Roth offers a sane approach to the noisy debates surrounding affirmative action, political correctness, and free speech, urging us to envision college as a space in which students (...)
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  37.  6
    Sidgwick’s Practical Ethics: From Practice to Theory.Michael S. Pritchard - 1998 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 12 (2):147-151.
    In contrast to The Methods of Ethics, Sidgwick’s Practical Ethics counsels not trying to “get to the bottom of things” in our efforts to reach “some results of value for practical guidance and life.” For Sidgwick, both practical and theoretical ethics should start from the Morality of Common Sense. Although he retained his utilitarian outlook in Practical Ethics, this paper suggests that the Morality of Common Sense has the resources to hold its own against utilitarian revision.
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  38.  36
    Sidgwick’s Practical Ethics: From Practice to Theory.Michael S. Pritchard - 1998 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 12 (2):147-151.
    In contrast to The Methods of Ethics, Sidgwick’s Practical Ethics counsels not trying to “get to the bottom of things” in our efforts to reach “some results of value for practical guidance and life.” For Sidgwick, both practical and theoretical ethics should start from the Morality of Common Sense. Although he retained his utilitarian outlook in Practical Ethics, this paper suggests that the Morality of Common Sense has the resources to hold its own against utilitarian revision.
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  39.  16
    Blaga’s Legacy in America - Giving Blaga a Legacy in America.Michael S. Jones - unknown
  40.  15
    Yaffe's attempts.Michael S. Moore - 2013 - Legal Theory 19 (2):136-177.
    Yaffe's handling of two general questions is assessed in this review. The first question is why mere attempts (as opposed to successful wrongdoing) should be made punishable in a well-conceived criminal code. The second question is how attempt liability should be conceived in such a code. As to the first question, Yaffe's nonsubstantive mode of answering it (in terms of his ) is contrasted to answers based on some more substantive desert-bases; Yaffe's own more substantive kind of answer (in terms (...)
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  41.  20
    Galileo's intellectual revolution: Middle period, 1610-1632.Michael S. Mahoney - 1975 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 13 (1):101-103.
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  42.  7
    IBM's Early Computers. Charles J. Bashe, Lyle R. Johnson, John H. Palmer, Emerson W. Pugh.Michael S. Mahoney - 1987 - Isis 78 (1):114-115.
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  43. The Cognitive Neurosciences.Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.) - 1995 - MIT Press.
  44.  6
    Rawls’s Moral Psychology.Michael S. Pritchard - 1977 - Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 8 (1):59-72.
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  45. A Note on Kojève's Phenomenology of Right.Michael S. Roth - 1983 - Political Theory 11 (3):447-450.
  46. Essays on Ayn Rand's "We the Living".Michael S. Berliner, Andrew Bernstein, Jeff Britting, Dina Garmong, Onkar Ghate, John Lewis, Scott McConnell, Shoshana Milgram, Richard E. Ralston, John Ridpath, Tara Smith & Jena Trammell - 2004 - Lexington Books.
    Ayn Rand's first novel, We the Living, offers an early form of the author's nascent philosophy—the philosophy Rand later called Objectivism. Robert Mayhew's collection of entirely new essays brings together pre-eminent scholars of Rand's writing. In part a history of We the Living, from its earliest drafts to the Italian film later based upon it, Mayhew's collection goes on to explore the enduring significance of Rand's first novel as a work both of philosophy and of literature.
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  47.  28
    Guest editor's note.Michael S. McKenna - 2000 - The Journal of Ethics 4 (4):307-307.
    Excerpt from Guest Editor's Note, from Special Issue: Nietzsche and Religion. The papers in this themed edition of the Journal are a selection drawn from those given at the Eighth Annual Conference of the Friedrich Nietzsche Society held at the University of Greenwich in 11-13 September 1998.
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  48. The irrationality of recalcitrant emotions.Michael S. Brady - 2009 - Philosophical Studies 145 (3):413 - 430.
    A recalcitrant emotion is one which conflicts with evaluative judgement. (A standard example is where someone is afraid of flying despite believing that it poses little or no danger.) The phenomenon of emotional recalcitrance raises an important problem for theories of emotion, namely to explain the sense in which recalcitrant emotions involve rational conflict. In this paper I argue that existing ‘neojudgementalist’ accounts of emotions fail to provide plausible explanations of the irrationality of recalcitrant emotions, and develop and defend my (...)
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  49.  2
    Essays on Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged.Michael S. Berliner, Andrew Bernstein, Harry Binswanger, Tore Boeckmann, Jeff Britting, Debi Ghate, Onkar Ghate, Allan Gotthelf, Edwin A. Locke, Shoshana Milgram, Leonard Peikoff, Richard Ralston, Gregory Salmieri, Tara Smith, Mary Ann Sures & Darryl Wright - 2009 - Lexington Books.
    This is the first scholarly study of Atlas Shrugged, covering in detail the historical, literary, and philosophical aspects of Ayn Rand's magnum opus. Topics explored in depth include the history behind the novel's creation, publication, and reception; its nature as a romantic novel; and its presentation of a radical new philosophy.
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  50.  1
    Essays on Ayn Rand's Anthem.Michael S. Berliner, Andy Bernstein, Harry Binswanger, Tore Boeckmann, Jeff Britting, Onkar Ghate, Lindsay Joseph, John Lewis, Shoshana Milgram, Amy Peikoff, Richard E. Ralston, Greg Salmieri & Darryl Wright (eds.) - 2005 - Lexington Books.
    The essays in this collection treat historical, literary, and philosophical topics related to Ayn Rand's Anthem, an anti-utopia fantasy set in the future. The first book-length study on Anthem, this collection covers subjects such as free will, political freedom, and the connection between freedom and individual thought and privacy.
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