Results for 'Michael S. McCloskey'

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  1.  24
    Secondary psychopathy, but not primary psychopathy, is associated with risky decision-making in noninstitutionalized young adults.Andy C. Dean, Lily L. Altstein, Mitchell E. Berman, Joseph I. Constans, Catherine A. Sugar & Michael S. McCloskey - 2013 - Personality and Individual Differences 54:272–277.
    Although risky decision-making has been posited to contribute to the maladaptive behavior of individuals with psychopathic tendencies, the performance of psychopathic groups on a common task of risky decision-making, the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT; Bechara, Damasio, Damasio, & Anderson, 1994), has been equivocal. Different aspects of psychopathy (personality traits, antisocial deviance) and/or moderating variables may help to explain these inconsistent findings. In a sample of college students (N = 129, age 18–27), we examined the relationship between primary and secondary psychopathic (...)
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  2.  17
    Toward a New Socialism.Matt Bakker, Frank Bardacke, Johanna Brenner, Harry Brighouse, Chris Dixon, Barbara Epstein, Fred Evans, Ann Ferguson, Milton Fisk, Michael Hames-Garcia, Nancy Holmstrom, Michael W. Howard, Serenella Iovino, Stephanie Luce, Barbara McCloskey & Eduardo Mendieta - 2006 - Lexington Books.
    Toward a New Socialism offers a critical analysis of capitalism's failings and the imminent need for socialism as an alternative form of government. Dr. Richard Schmitt joins with Dr. Anatole Anton to compile a volume of essays exploring the benefits and consequences of a socialist system as an avenue of increased human solidarity and ethical principle.
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  3.  13
    Exorcising Laplace's Demon: Chaos and Antichaos, History and Metahistory.Michael Shermer - 1995 - History and Theory 34 (1):71.
    The analysis of physical and biological systems through models and mathematics of chaotic behavior and nonlinear dynamics rose to prominence in the 1980s. Many authors, most notably Ilya Prigogine and Isabelle Stengers, made glancing references to applications of this new paradigm to the social and historical sciences, but little fruit was harvested until this decade. Physiologists studying irregular heart rhythms, psychologists examining brain activity, biologists graphing population trends, economists tracking stock price movements, military strategists assessing the outbreak of wars, and (...)
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  4.  31
    Exorcising Laplace's Demon: Chaos and Antichaos, History and Metahistory.Michael Shermer - 1995 - History and Theory 34 (1):59-83.
    The analysis of physical and biological systems through models and mathematics of chaotic behavior and nonlinear dynamics rose to prominence in the 1980s. Many authors, most notably Ilya Prigogine and Isabelle Stengers, made glancing references to applications of this new paradigm to the social and historical sciences, but little fruit was harvested until this decade. Physiologists studying irregular heart rhythms, psychologists examining brain activity, biologists graphing population trends, economists tracking stock price movements, military strategists assessing the outbreak of wars, and (...)
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  5. Causation and Responsibility*: MICHAEL S. MOORE.Michael S. Moore - 1999 - Social Philosophy and Policy 16 (2):1-51.
    In various areas of Anglo-American law, legal liability turns on causation. In torts and contracts, we are each liable only for those harms we have caused by the actions that breach our legal duties. Such doctrines explicitly make causation an element of liability. In criminal law, sometimes the causal element for liability is equally explicit, as when a statute makes punishable any act that has “ caused … abuse to the child….” More often, the causal element in criminal liability is (...)
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  6. Choice, Character, and Excuse*: MICHAEL S. MOORE.Michael S. Moore - 1990 - Social Philosophy and Policy 7 (2):29-58.
    Freud justified his extensive theorizing about dreams by the observation that they were “the royal road” to something much more general: namely, our unconscious mental life. The current preoccupation with the theory of excuse in criminal law scholarship can be given a similar justification, for the excuses are the royal road to theories of responsibility generally. The thought is that if we understand why we excuse in certain situations but not others, we will have also gained a much more general (...)
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  7.  44
    The Gettier problem and legal proof: Michael S. Pardo.Michael S. Pardo - 2010 - Legal Theory 16 (1):37-57.
    This article explores the relationships between legal proof and fundamental epistemic concepts such as knowledge and justification. A survey of the legal literature reveals a confusing array of seemingly inconsistent proposals and presuppositions regarding these relationships. This article makes two contributions. First, it reconciles a number of apparent inconsistencies and tensions in accounts of the epistemology of legal proof. Second, it argues that there is a deeper connection between knowledge and legal proof than is typically argued for or presupposed in (...)
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  8.  54
    John Martin Fischer's The Metaphysics of Free Will: An Essay on Control: Michael S. McKenna.Michael S. McKenna - 1997 - Legal Theory 3 (4):379-397.
    John Martin Fischer's The Metaphysics of Free Will is devoted to two major projects. First, Fischer defends the thesis that determinism is incompatible with a person's control over alternatives to the actual future. Second, Fischer defends the striking thesis that such control is not necessary for moral responsibility. This review essay examines Fischer's arguments for each thesis. Fischer's defense of the incompatibilist thesis is the most innovative to date, and I argue that his formulation restructures the free will debate. To (...)
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  9. R. S. Peters' Normative Conception of Education and Educational Aims.Michael S. Katz - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (s1):97-108.
    This article aims to highlight why R. S. Peters' conceptual analysis of ‘education’ was such an important contribution to the normative field of philosophy of education. In the article, I do the following: 1) explicate Peters' conception of philosophy of education as a field of philosophy and explain his approach to the philosophical analysis of concepts; 2) emphasize several (normative) features of Peters' conception of education, while pointing to a couple of oversights; and 3) suggest how Peters' analysis might be (...)
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  10. Mill's moral theory and the problem of preference change.Michael S. McPherson - 1982 - Ethics 92 (2):252-273.
    A reconsideration of mill's theory of "higher pleasures," construed as a way of evaluating changes in preferences or character that result from changes in social environment. mill's account is criticized and partly reconstructed in light of modern preference theory, but viewed favorably as an illuminating attempt to address a fundamental problem in moral evaluation of social institutions. mill's advocacy of the higher pleasures is defended in particular against the charge that it is incompatible with his commitment to liberty.
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  11.  19
    Michael’s Story or the Paradox of Normalcy.Michael Kreuzer - 2015 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 5 (2):E7-E10.
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  12.  32
    Michael S. Hogue: The promise of religious naturalism: Rowman & Littlefield, Lanham, MD, 2010, xxx + 252 pp., $74.95. [REVIEW]Michael L. Raposa - 2012 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 72 (1):59-62.
  13.  9
    Darwin's vertical thinking: Mountains, mobility, and the imagination in 19th‐century geology.Michael S. Reidy - 2020 - Centaurus 62 (4):631-646.
    Like other aspiring geologists in the 1830s, Darwin focused heavily on the rising and falling of the earth's crust. I use his time in the Andes to underscore the importance he placed on larger questions of vertical movement, which mountains helped to solidify in his mind. His most impressive ramblings occurred in 1835 on two high passes in the Andes. Prior to his upland journey, he was well prepared to see the gradual movement of the earth's crust, but his time (...)
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  14.  87
    Moore’s Truths About Causation and Responsibility: A Reply to Alexander and Ferzan. [REVIEW]Michael S. Moore - 2012 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 6 (3):445-462.
    In this response to the review of Moore, Causation and Responsibility, by Larry Alexander and Kimberly Ferzan, previously published in this journal, two issues are discussed. The first is whether causation, counterfactual dependence, moral blame, and culpability, are all scalar properties or relations, that is, matters of more-or-less rather than either-or. The second issue discussed is whether deontological moral obligation is best described as a prohibition against using another as a means, or rather, as a prohibition on an agent strongly (...)
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  15.  16
    Relating Neuroscience to Responsibility: Comments on Hirstein, Sifferd, and Fagan’s Responsible Brains.Michael S. Moore - 2022 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 16 (2):283-298.
    The article explores the agreements and disagreements between the author and the authors of Responsible Brains on how neuroscience relates to moral responsibility. The agreements are fundamental: neuroscience is not the harbinger of revolutionary revision of our views of when persons are morally responsible for the harms that they cause. The disagreements are in the details of what is needed for neuroscience to be the helper of the moral sciences.
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  16.  14
    Men's responses to feminism at the turn of the century.Michael S. Kimmel - 1987 - Gender and Society 1 (3):261-283.
    This article examines the variety of men's responses to feminism in late nineteenthand early twentieth-century United States through texts that addressed the claims raised by the turn-of-the-century women's movements. Antifeminist texts relied on traditional arguments, as well as Social Darwinist and natural law notions, to reassert the patriarchal family and to oppose women's suffrage and participation in the public sphere. Masculinist texts sought to combat the purported feminization of American manhood by proposing islands of masculinity, untainted by feminizing forces; proscribed (...)
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  17.  30
    On Hart's category mistake.Michael S. Green - 2013 - Legal Theory 19 (4):347-369.
    This essay concerns Scott Shapiro's criticism that H.L.A. Hart's theory of law suffers from a Although other philosophers of law have summarily dismissed Shapiro's criticism, I argue that it identifies an important requirement for an adequate theory of law. Such a theory must explain why legal officials justify their actions by reference to abstract propositional entities, instead of pointing to the existence of social practices. A virtue of Shapiro's planning theory of law is that it can explain this phenomenon. Despite (...)
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  18.  40
    Foucault's "History of the Present".Michael S. Roth - 1981 - History and Theory 20 (1):32-46.
    In The Birth of the Clinic, The Order of Things, and Discipline and Punish, Foucault writes a "history of the present" by showing the connections between the archaeology of knowledge and criticism. In the first, he is fundamentally concerned with the changes in human perception evident at the end of the eighteenth century and the relation of these changes to the fundamental structures of experience. Underlying the history of medicine is the moral and political attempt to link the development of (...)
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  19.  28
    Author's personal copy.Michael S. North - unknown
    The present study investigates whether people can infer the preferences of others from spontaneous facial expressions alone. We utilize a paradigm that unobtrusively records people's natural facial reactions to relatively mundane stimuli while they simultaneously report which ones they find more appealing. Videos were then presented to perceivers who attempted to infer the choices of the target individuals—thereby linking perceiver inferences to objective outcomes. Perceivers demonstrated above-chance ability to infer target preferences across four different stimulus categories: people (attractiveness), cartoons (humor), (...)
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  20.  17
    Libet's Challenge (s) to Responsible Agency.Michael S. Moore - 2010 - In Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Lynn Nadel (eds.), Conscious Will and Responsibility: A Tribute to Benjamin Libet. Oup Usa. pp. 207.
  21.  11
    The Mutability of Biotechnology Patents: From Unwieldy Products of Nature to Independent 'Object/s'.Michael S. Carolan - 2010 - Theory, Culture and Society 27 (1):110-129.
    This article details how patent law works to create discrete, immutable biological ‘objects’. This socio-legal maneuver is necessary to distinguish these artifacts from the unwieldy realm of the natural world. The creation of ‘objects’ also serves the interests of capital, where a stable, unchanging, immutable object goes hand in hand with commodification. Yet this stabilization is incomplete. Pointing to a variety of different examples, this article illustrates how biotech patents do not speak to specific, immutable things. Biotech patents, rather, are (...)
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  22.  23
    The Ethics of Care and Empathy, by Michael Slote.The Impossibility of Perfection: Aristotle, Feminism, and the Complexities of Ethics, by Michael Slote.Michael S. Brady - 2015 - Mind 124 (495):980-988.
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  23.  52
    Rawls’s Moral Psychology.Michael S. Pritchard - 1977 - Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 8 (1):59-72.
  24.  35
    God’s Rivals: Why Has God Allowed Different Religions? Insights from the Bible and the Early Church. [REVIEW]Michael S. Jones - 2010 - Philosophia Christi 12 (1):239-242.
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  25.  2
    Safe Enough Spaces: A Pragmatist’s Approach to Inclusion, Free Speech, and Political Correctness on College Campuses.Michael S. Roth - 2019 - Yale University Press.
    _From the president of Wesleyan University, a compassionate and provocative manifesto on the crises confronting higher education_ In this bracing book, Michael S. Roth stakes out a pragmatist path through the thicket of issues facing colleges today to carry out the mission of higher education. With great empathy, candor, subtlety, and insight, Roth offers a sane approach to the noisy debates surrounding affirmative action, political correctness, and free speech, urging us to envision college as a space in which students (...)
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  26.  6
    Sidgwick’s Practical Ethics: From Practice to Theory.Michael S. Pritchard - 1998 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 12 (2):147-151.
    In contrast to The Methods of Ethics, Sidgwick’s Practical Ethics counsels not trying to “get to the bottom of things” in our efforts to reach “some results of value for practical guidance and life.” For Sidgwick, both practical and theoretical ethics should start from the Morality of Common Sense. Although he retained his utilitarian outlook in Practical Ethics, this paper suggests that the Morality of Common Sense has the resources to hold its own against utilitarian revision.
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  27.  36
    Sidgwick’s Practical Ethics: From Practice to Theory.Michael S. Pritchard - 1998 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 12 (2):147-151.
    In contrast to The Methods of Ethics, Sidgwick’s Practical Ethics counsels not trying to “get to the bottom of things” in our efforts to reach “some results of value for practical guidance and life.” For Sidgwick, both practical and theoretical ethics should start from the Morality of Common Sense. Although he retained his utilitarian outlook in Practical Ethics, this paper suggests that the Morality of Common Sense has the resources to hold its own against utilitarian revision.
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  28.  16
    Blaga’s Legacy in America - Giving Blaga a Legacy in America.Michael S. Jones - unknown
  29.  15
    Yaffe's attempts.Michael S. Moore - 2013 - Legal Theory 19 (2):136-177.
    Yaffe's handling of two general questions is assessed in this review. The first question is why mere attempts (as opposed to successful wrongdoing) should be made punishable in a well-conceived criminal code. The second question is how attempt liability should be conceived in such a code. As to the first question, Yaffe's nonsubstantive mode of answering it (in terms of his ) is contrasted to answers based on some more substantive desert-bases; Yaffe's own more substantive kind of answer (in terms (...)
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  30.  3
    Benjamin Balak's McCloskey's rhetoric: discourse ethics in economics. New York: Routledge, 2006, 142 pp. [REVIEW]Daniel Vargas Gómez - 2009 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 2 (1):143.
  31.  20
    Galileo's intellectual revolution: Middle period, 1610-1632.Michael S. Mahoney - 1975 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 13 (1):101-103.
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  32.  7
    IBM's Early Computers. Charles J. Bashe, Lyle R. Johnson, John H. Palmer, Emerson W. Pugh.Michael S. Mahoney - 1987 - Isis 78 (1):114-115.
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  33. The Cognitive Neurosciences.Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.) - 1995 - MIT Press.
  34.  6
    Rawls’s Moral Psychology.Michael S. Pritchard - 1977 - Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 8 (1):59-72.
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  35. A Note on Kojève's Phenomenology of Right.Michael S. Roth - 1983 - Political Theory 11 (3):447-450.
  36. Essays on Ayn Rand's "We the Living".Michael S. Berliner, Andrew Bernstein, Jeff Britting, Dina Garmong, Onkar Ghate, John Lewis, Scott McConnell, Shoshana Milgram, Richard E. Ralston, John Ridpath, Tara Smith & Jena Trammell - 2004 - Lexington Books.
    Ayn Rand's first novel, We the Living, offers an early form of the author's nascent philosophy—the philosophy Rand later called Objectivism. Robert Mayhew's collection of entirely new essays brings together pre-eminent scholars of Rand's writing. In part a history of We the Living, from its earliest drafts to the Italian film later based upon it, Mayhew's collection goes on to explore the enduring significance of Rand's first novel as a work both of philosophy and of literature.
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  37.  28
    Guest editor's note.Michael S. McKenna - 2000 - The Journal of Ethics 4 (4):307-307.
    Excerpt from Guest Editor's Note, from Special Issue: Nietzsche and Religion. The papers in this themed edition of the Journal are a selection drawn from those given at the Eighth Annual Conference of the Friedrich Nietzsche Society held at the University of Greenwich in 11-13 September 1998.
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  38. The irrationality of recalcitrant emotions.Michael S. Brady - 2009 - Philosophical Studies 145 (3):413 - 430.
    A recalcitrant emotion is one which conflicts with evaluative judgement. (A standard example is where someone is afraid of flying despite believing that it poses little or no danger.) The phenomenon of emotional recalcitrance raises an important problem for theories of emotion, namely to explain the sense in which recalcitrant emotions involve rational conflict. In this paper I argue that existing ‘neojudgementalist’ accounts of emotions fail to provide plausible explanations of the irrationality of recalcitrant emotions, and develop and defend my (...)
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  39.  2
    Essays on Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged.Michael S. Berliner, Andrew Bernstein, Harry Binswanger, Tore Boeckmann, Jeff Britting, Debi Ghate, Onkar Ghate, Allan Gotthelf, Edwin A. Locke, Shoshana Milgram, Leonard Peikoff, Richard Ralston, Gregory Salmieri, Tara Smith, Mary Ann Sures & Darryl Wright - 2009 - Lexington Books.
    This is the first scholarly study of Atlas Shrugged, covering in detail the historical, literary, and philosophical aspects of Ayn Rand's magnum opus. Topics explored in depth include the history behind the novel's creation, publication, and reception; its nature as a romantic novel; and its presentation of a radical new philosophy.
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  40.  1
    Essays on Ayn Rand's Anthem.Michael S. Berliner, Andy Bernstein, Harry Binswanger, Tore Boeckmann, Jeff Britting, Onkar Ghate, Lindsay Joseph, John Lewis, Shoshana Milgram, Amy Peikoff, Richard E. Ralston, Greg Salmieri & Darryl Wright (eds.) - 2005 - Lexington Books.
    The essays in this collection treat historical, literary, and philosophical topics related to Ayn Rand's Anthem, an anti-utopia fantasy set in the future. The first book-length study on Anthem, this collection covers subjects such as free will, political freedom, and the connection between freedom and individual thought and privacy.
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  41.  25
    Mohsin Hamid's The Reluctant Fundamentalist: Mimetic Desire in a Geopolitical Context.Michael S. Koppisch - 2018 - Contagion: Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture 25 (1):119-136.
    Critical readings of the novels and essays by the Pakistani writer Mohsin Hamid tend to emphasize the social and political aspects of his work. In his discussion of Hamid's best known novel, Peter Morey, for example, affirms that "in both its form … and its content, The Reluctant Fundamentalist addresses contemporary questions about national vs globalized structures of power."1 He then goes on to cite Matthew Hart and Jim Hansen, for whom the novel "is concerned with subjects like cross-cultural romance, (...)
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  42.  9
    Reason and Passion: Reid’s Reply to Hume.Michael S. Pritchard - 1978 - The Monist 61 (2):283-298.
    Although Hume’s theory of the passions has been vigorously criticized by contemporary philosophers, Hume’s immediate successors are seldom credited with serious criticisms of that theory. In fact, insofar as their views are considered at all, they typically are summarily dismissed. Alasdair MacIntyre’s treatment is a good illustration.
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  43. Compatibilism(s) for neuroscientists.Michael S. Moore - 2014 - In Enrique Villanueva (ed.), Law and the Philosophy of Action. Brill | Rodopi.
     
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  44.  17
    On Balzer's small set solution to Russell's Paradox.Michael S. Pollanen - 1993 - Journal of Value Inquiry 27 (3-4):541-541.
    The objective of this paper is to show that Russell's paradox cannot be solved just by defining a class as what is classified, as Balzer thinks. It can be solved not by defining a class, as he does, but by rejecting the assumption on which the validity of argument is based, that is, not conceding the truth of the disjunctive premise that a class is either an instance of itself or not an instance of itself.
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  45.  21
    What's in a name?: Bioethics -- and human rights -- at UNESCO.Michael S. Yesley - 2005 - Hastings Center Report 35 (2):8-8.
  46. Curiosity and the Value of Truth.Michael S. Brady - 2009 - In Adrian Haddock, Alan Millar & Duncan Pritchard (eds.), Epistemic Value. Oxford University Press. pp. 265-284.
    This chapter focuses on the question of whether true belief can have final value because it answers our ‘intellectual interest’ or ‘natural curiosity’. The idea is that sometimes we are interested in the truth on some issue not for any ulterior purpose, but simply because we are curious about that issue. It is argued that this approach fails to provide an adequate explanation of the final value of true belief, since there is an unbridgeable gap between our valuing the truth (...)
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  47. Hans Kelsen's non-reductive positivism.Michael S. Green - 2021 - In Torben Spaak (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Legal Positivism. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  48.  86
    Painfulness, Desire, and the Euthyphro Dilemma.Michael S. Brady - 2018 - American Philosophical Quarterly 55 (3):239-250.
    The traditional desire view of painfulness maintains that pain sensations are painful because the subject desires that they not be occurring. A significant criticism of this view is that it apparently succumbs to a version of the Euthyphro Dilemma: the desire view, it is argued, is committed to an implausible answer to the question of why pain sensations are painful. In this paper, I explain and defend a new desire view, and one which can avoid the Euthyphro Dilemma. This new (...)
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  49.  62
    Safety vs. sensitivity: Possible worlds and the law of evidence.Michael S. Pardo - 2018 - Legal Theory 24 (1):50-75.
    ABSTRACTThis article defends the importance of epistemic safety for legal evidence. Drawing on discussions of sensitivity and safety in epistemology, the article explores how similar considerations apply to legal proof. In the legal context, sensitivity concerns whether a factual finding would be made if it were false, and safety concerns how easily a factual finding could be false. The article critiques recent claims about the importance of sensitivity for the law of evidence. In particular, this critique argues that sensitivity does (...)
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  50. Placing Blame: A Theory of the Criminal Law.Michael S. Moore - 1997 - Oxford University Press.
    Originally published: Oxford: Clarendon, 1997.
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