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  1.  19
    Sociability, Perfectibility and the Intellectual Legacy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau.Michael Sonenscher - 2015 - History of European Ideas 41 (5):683-698.
    In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the concept of sociability was used mainly to refer to the putative range of primary human qualities or capabilities that preceded—or existed independently of—the formation of political societies. This article is an examination of the impact of Rousseau's thought on this then standard usage. Its initial focus is on Rousseau's concept of perfectibility and its bearing on the thought of Marie-Jean-Antoine-Nicolas de Caritat, marquis de Condorcet, and Friedrich Schlegel. Its broader aim is to show (...)
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  2.  2
    Republican Political Economy.Istvan Hont, Michael Sonenscher, Johnson Kent Wright, Stefan Altorfer-Ong & Rudolf Bolzern - 2007 - History of European Ideas 33 (4):390-475.
    The article provides an analysis of Georg Ludwig Schmid's ‘Reflexions sur l’Agriculture’, which was published as the first essay in the first issue of the publications of the Oeconomical Society of Berne, founded in 1759. Schmid connected the agricultural improvement movement of the time to the logic of international power competition that caused the 7 Years’ War and wished to preserve political economy as agronomy for the cause of peace and virtuous economic progress. In his essay on commerce and luxury, (...)
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  3.  20
    Ideology, Social Science and General Facts in Late Eighteenth-Century French Political Thought.Michael Sonenscher - 2009 - History of European Ideas 35 (1):24-37.
    Jean-Jacques Rousseau's attack on the natural jurisprudence of Grotius, Hobbes and Pufendorf is well known. But what happened to modern natural jurisprudence after Rousseau not very well known. The aim of this article is to try to show how and why it turned into what Emmanuel-Joseph Sieyès called “social science” and the bearing that this Rousseau-inspired transformation has on making sense of ideology, or the moral and political thought of the late eighteenth-century French ideologues.
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  4.  10
    Jean-Jacques Rousseau and the Foundations of Modern Political Thought.Michael Sonenscher - 2015 - Modern Intellectual History:1-27.
  5.  10
    French Economists and Bernese Agrarians: The Marquis de Mirabeau and the Economic Society of Berne.Michael Sonenscher - 2007 - History of European Ideas 33 (4):411-426.
    Physiocracy is still sometimes seen as an oddly archaic programme of agricultural development. The aim of this paper is to show that one of the Physiocrats’ prime concerns was to take the subject of agriculture out of international relations. The fiscal regime that was central to Physiocracy was designed to make every large territorial state self-sufficient and, by doing so, to break the connection between modern great power politics, the international division of labour, and the politics of necessity. From this (...)
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  6.  3
    Before Anarchy. Hobbes and His Critics in Modern International Thought. [REVIEW]Michael Sonenscher - 2016 - History of European Ideas 42 (8):1115-1116.
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  7. Jean-Jacques Rousseau: The Division of Labour, the Politics of the Imagination and the Concept of Federal Government.Michael Sonenscher - 2020 - Brill.
    This is a book about why Jean-Jacques Rousseau can be seen as one of the first theorists of the concept of civil society and a key source of the idea of a federal system.
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  8. Sieyès: Political Writings: Including the Debate Between Sieyes and Tom Paine in 1791.Michael Sonenscher (ed.) - 2003 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    The abbe Emmanuel Joseph Sieyes distinguished himself as the chief theoretician of the French Revolution--and as a revolutionary constitutional and social theorist in his own right--through his rigorously analytical theory of representative government and its corollary, the representative character of social life in general. He expressed the essence of his thought in a series of three pamphlets published in the months leading up to the meeting of the Estates-General in 1789. This volume presents all three essays--_Views of the Executive Means_, (...)
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  9. The Cambridge History of French Thought: Edited by Michael Moriarty and Jeremy Jennings, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2019, Xviii + 570 Pp., £125.00 (Hardback), ISBN 978-1-107-16367-6. [REVIEW]Michael Sonenscher - 2020 - History of European Ideas 46 (3):355-356.
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  10.  15
    “The Moment of Social Science”: Thedecade Philosophiqueand Late Eighteenth-Century French Thought.Michael Sonenscher - 2009 - Modern Intellectual History 6 (1):121-146.
    The first issue of the Décade philosophique appeared on 29 April 1794. In all, fifty-four volumes of the journal were published between that date and 1807, when, on Napoleon's orders, it was forced to merge with the Mercure français. The Décade was published three times a month and the periodical soon became one of the intellectual powerhouses of the French republic after Robespierre. But quite what, in this particular setting, an intellectual powerhouse might have been is still an open question. (...)
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