Results for 'Michael Torsten Much'

999 found
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  1.  13
    Tibetan StudiesTransmission of the Tibetan CanonTibetan Culture in DiasporaDevelopment, Society, and Environment in TibetTibetan Mountain Deities: Their Cults and RepresentationsThe Inner Asian International Style, 12th-14th Centuries. [REVIEW]Edwin Gerow, Helmut Krasser, Michael Torsten Much, Ernst Steinkellner, Helmut Tauscher, Helmut Eimer, Frank J. Korom, Graham E. Clarke, Anne-Marie Blondeau, Deborah E. Klimburg-Salter & Eva Allinger - 2000 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 120 (1):154.
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  2.  30
    How Much Should A Person Consume?: Environmentalism In India and The United States. [REVIEW]Mark Michael - 2008 - Environmental Ethics 30 (1):97-100.
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  3.  13
    Biological Species: Natural Kinds, Individuals, or What?,„.Ruse Michael - 1987 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 38 (2):225-242.
    What are biological species? Aristotelians and Lockeans agree that they are natural kinds; but, evolutionary theory shows that neither traditional philosophical approach is truly adequate. Recently, Michael Ghiselin and David Hull have argued that species are individuals. This claim is shown to be against the spirit of much modern biology. It is concluded that species are natural kinds of a sort, and that any 'objectivity' they possess comes from their being at the focus of a consilience of inductions.
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  4. Reviews : Michael Billig, Arguing and Thinking: A Rhetorical Approach to Social Psychology, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989 (1987), Paper £9.95, Vi + 290 Pp. [REVIEW]Mike Michael - 1991 - History of the Human Sciences 4 (3):441-444.
  5.  28
    Much More Than Money: Conceptual Integration and the Materialization of Time in Michael Ende's "Momo" and the Social Sciences.Cristóbal Pagán Cánovas & Ursina Teuscher - 2012 - Pragmatics and Cognition 20 (3):546-569.
    We analyze conceptual patterns shared by Michael Ende’s novel about time, Momo, and examples of time conceptualization from psychology, sociology, economics, conventional language, and real social practices. We study three major mappings in the materialization of time: time as money in relation with time banking, time units as objects produced by an internal clock, and time as a substance that flows. We show that binary projections between experiential domains are not enough to model the complexity of meaning construction in (...)
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  6.  13
    Much More Than Money: Conceptual Integration and the Materialization of Time in Michael Endes Momo and the Social Sciences.Cristóbal Pagán Cánovas & Ursina Teuscher - 2012 - Pragmatics and Cognition 20 (3):546-569.
    We analyze conceptual patterns shared by Michael Ende’s novel about time, Momo , and examples of time conceptualization from psychology, sociology, economics, conventional language, and real social practices. We study three major mappings in the materialization of time: time as money in relation with time banking, time units as objects produced by an internal clock, and time as a substance that flows. We show that binary projections between experiential domains are not enough to model the complexity of meaning construction (...)
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  7. Too Much Property: A Comment on Michael Otsukaʼs Libertarianism Without Inequality. [REVIEW]Daniel Attas - 2006 - Iyyun 55:287-298.
     
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  8. Michael Walzer's Just War Theory: Some Issues of Responsibility. [REVIEW]Igor Primoratz - 2002 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 5 (2):221-243.
    In his widely influential statement of just war theory, Michael Walzer exempts conscripted soldiers from all responsibility for taking part in war, whether just or unjust (the thesis of the moral equality of soldiers). He endows the overwhelming majority of civilians with almost absolute immunity from military attack on the ground that they aren't responsible for the war their country is waging, whether just or unjust. I argue that Walzer is much too lenient on both soldiers and civilians. (...)
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  9. Of All Things: On Michael Marder's Reading of Derrida. [REVIEW]Roy Ben-Shai - 2010 - Télos 2010 (150):185-192.
    The Event of the Thing by Michael Marder is probably one of the most comprehensive and integrative readings of Derrida's oeuvre to date. A virtue of the book is that, despite the comprehensiveness of its subject matter, it does not assume the removed posture of an introduction, an exposition, or an explication. Its relation to the Derridian text is much more internal and intimate, and it should be noted that it presupposes a rather thorough knowledge of Derrida's oeuvre (...)
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  10.  25
    Approaches to Global Ethics: Michael Sandel's Justice and Li Zehou's Harmony.Paul J. D'Ambrosio - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (3):720-738.
    In recent years Michael Sandel’s communitarian criticism of John Rawls’s theory of justice has gained much attention in philosophical circles. Specifically, he takes issue with the conception of the self—implicit in Rawls’s “veil of ignorance”: an extraction of the individual from their social environment, which creates an “unencumbered self” that is then used to theorize about justice. Sandel believes that some social ties are so deeply embedded in the human experience that even hypothetical isolation of the individual is (...)
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  11.  75
    Review of SHERRY F. COLB AND MICHAEL C. DORF Beating Hearts: Abortion and Animal Rights. [REVIEW]Nathan Nobis - 2016 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 1 (1):1-2.
    In this book, law professors Sherry F. Colb and Michael C. Dorf argue that: -/- many non-human animals, at least vertebrates, are morally considerable and prima facie wrong to harm because they are sentient, i.e., conscious and capable of experiencing pains and pleasures; most aborted human fetuses are not sentient -- their brains and nervous systems are not yet developed enough for sentience -- and so the motivating moral concern for animals doesn't apply to most abortions[2]; later abortions affecting (...)
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  12. Michael Oakeshott on Religion, Aesthetics, and Politics.Elizabeth Campbell Corey - 2006 - University of Missouri.
    For much of his career, British political philosopher Michael Oakeshott was identified with Margaret Thatcher’s conservative policies. He has been called by some a guru to the Tories, while others have considered him one of the last proponents of British Idealism. Best known for such books as _Experience and Its Modes_ and _Rationalism in Politics_, Oakeshott has been the subject of numerous studies, but always with an emphasis on his political thought. Elizabeth Campbell Corey now makes the case (...)
     
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  13. Michael Jubien, Ontology, Modality, and the Fallacy of Reference. [REVIEW]Theodore Sider - 1999 - Noûs 33 (2):284–294.
    Michael Jubien’s Ontology, Modality, and the Fallacy of Reference is an interesting and lively discussion of those three topics. In ontology, Jubien defends, to a first approximation, a Quinean conception: a world of objects that may be arbitrarily sliced or summed. Slicing yields temporal parts; summing yields aggregates, or fusions. Jubien is very unQuinean in his explicit Platonism regarding properties and propositions, but concerns about abstracta are peripheral to much of the argumentation in the book.1 His version of (...)
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  14.  17
    Regret and Moral Maturity: A Response to Michael Ing and Manyul Im.Amy Olberding - 2015 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (4):579-587.
    This essay elaborates on my essay, “Confucius’ Complaints and the Analects’ Account of the Good Life,” responding to issues and criticisms raised by Michael Ing and Manyul Im. Ing’s and Im’s critiques most invite reflection on regret, both as it might situate in Confucius’ own life and as it could feature more broadly in developed moral maturity. I consider two modes of regret: regret concerning compromises of conscience and end-of-life regret. The latter can naturally include elements of the former, (...)
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  15. Nonsense on Stilts: Michael Albert's Parecon Loyola University Chicago January 16, 2006.David Schweickart - manuscript
    What are we to make of the "Parecon" phenomenon? Michael Albert 's book made it to number thirteen on Amazon.com a few days after some on-line promotion.1 Eight of the twelve Amazon.com reviewers had given the book five stars. It has been, or is being, translated into Arabic, Bengali, Telagu, Croatian, Czech, Finnish, French, German, Greek, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Spanish, Swedish and Turkish.2 The book has been endorsed by Noam Chomsky, who says it "merits close attention, debate and action," (...)
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  16.  61
    Religion and the Mode of Practice in Michael Oakeshott.Elizabeth Corey - 2009 - Zygon 44 (1):139-151.
    Michael Oakeshott's religious view of the world stands behind much of his political and philosophical writing. In this essay I first discuss Oakeshott's view of religion and the mode of practice in his own terms. I attempt next to illuminate his idea of religion by describing it in less technical language, drawing upon other thinkers such as Georg Simmel and George Santayana, who share similar views. I then evaluate Oakeshott's view as a whole, considering whether his ideas about (...)
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  17. Education and the Voice of Michael Oakeshott.Kevin Williams - 2007 - Imprint Academic.
    The work of Michael Oakeshott has retained a striking currency in philosophical discourse about education. This is hardly surprising in view of his influence on Paul Hirst and Richard Peters, two philosophers whose work had an enormous impact on educational thinking and practice in the English-speaking world. And, although much of the detail in educational debate may change, the fundamental underlying concerns regarding the conception of the person, the nature of knowledge and the moral life and their expression (...)
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  18.  61
    Freedom of the Encumbered Self: Michael Sandel and Iris Murdoch.C. Fred Alford - 2005 - Contemporary Political Theory 4 (2):109.
    The debate over encumbered versus unencumbered selves that characterized the dialogue between liberalism and republicanism did not end well. Neither side seemed enlightened by its encounter with the other, as it became increasingly difficult to pin down the differences between the sides, never more so than when Michael Sandel was violently agreeing with Richard Dagger. Drawing on the work of novelist and philosopher Iris Murdoch, this essay argues that Sandel could have made a much stronger argument for his (...)
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  19.  12
    Freedom of the Encumbered Self: Michael Sandel and Iris Murdoch.C. Fred Alford - 2005 - Contemporary Political Theory 4 (2):109-128.
    The debate over encumbered versus unencumbered selves that characterized the dialogue between liberalism and republicanism did not end well. Neither side seemed enlightened by its encounter with the other, as it became increasingly difficult to pin down the differences between the sides, never more so than when Michael Sandel was violently agreeing with Richard Dagger. Drawing on the work of novelist and philosopher Iris Murdoch, this essay argues that Sandel could have made a much stronger argument for his (...)
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  20.  75
    Michael Polanyi on Art and Religion: Some Critical Reflections on Meaning.Ronald L. Hall - 1982 - Zygon 17 (1):9-18.
    This paper is a critique of the theory of meaning in art and religion that Michael Polanyi developed in his last work entitled Meaning. After giving a brief summary of Polanyi’s theory of art, I raise two serious difficulties, not with the theory itself, but with the claims Polanyi makes about the relation of meaning in art to science and religion. Regarding the first difficulty, I argue that Polanyi betrays an earlier insight when in Meaning he attempts to dissociate (...)
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  21.  42
    From Greece to Babylon:The Political Thought of Andrew Michael Ramsay (1686–1743).Doohwan Ahn - 2011 - History of European Ideas 37 (4):421-437.
    This paper explores the political thought of Andrew Michael Ramsay with particular reference to his highly acclaimed book called A New Cyropaedia, or the Travels of Cyrus (1727). Dedicated to Prince Charles Edward Stuart, the Young Pretender, to whom he was tutor, this work has been hitherto viewed as a Jacobite imitation of the Telemachus, Son of Ulysses(1699) of his eminent teacher archbishop Fénelon of Cambrai. By tracing the dual legacy of the first Persian Emperor Cyrus in Western thought, (...)
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  22.  23
    The Ethics of Detachment in Santayana's Philosophy by Michael Brodrick.Pierre-Luc Dostie Proulx - 2016 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 52 (1):125-128.
    Michael Brodrick’s book, The Ethics of Detachment in Santayana’s Philosophy, constitutes a much-needed contribution to the field of American philosophy. Although it is common for contemporary authors to claim that their preferred philosopher has been misunderstood, few can do so with as much conviction as Broderick has done for George Santayana, “a great and unjustly neglected philosopher”.The overarching goal of Brodrick’s investigation is the presentation of a conceptual framework for an “ethics of detachment” fundamentally mediated by human (...)
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  23.  12
    Michael Ruse and His Fifteen Years of Booknotes – for Better or for Worse.David L. Hull - 2001 - Biology and Philosophy 16 (3):423-435.
    In this paper I trace Michael Ruse's Booknotes from the first volumeof Biology and Philosophy in 1986 to the present. I deal withboth the style and the content of these booknotes. Ruse paid specialattention to authors outside of the traditional English axis as wellas to feminist writers. He complained that too much attention wasbeing paid to certain topics (e.g., evolutionary ethics, evolutionaryepistemology, the species problem and reduction) while other, moreimportant topics were all but ignored (e.g., natural selection,population genetics, (...)
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  24. The Intractable Rivalry: Michael Ruse’s The Evolution-Creation Struggle.Stephen Dilley - 2007 - Ars Disputandi 7.
    In The Evolution-Creation Struggle, Michael Ruse seeks to answer, ‘Why is there so much controversy surrounding evolutionary theory?’ He does so by tracing the historical development of the theory and the two major reactions to it. These major reactions, for and against, are not just views about science, but full blooded ‘rival religions.’ They each have a system of origins, morality, and eschatology. So the conflict over evolutionary theory persists because it is a clash between incompatible worldviews. This (...)
     
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  25.  21
    Michael Oakeshott on Life: Waiting with Godot.G. Worthington - 1995 - History of Political Thought 16 (1):105.
    Until quite recently Michael Oakeshott has been widely regarded as a political thinker. So clearly has he been taken to express his political views that there is often little question as to where he lies in the political spectrum. He has been perceived by both �friend� and �foe� as one of the most eloquent twentieth- century exponents of the conservative cause. His best known work is a collection of essays first published together in 1962 as Rationalism in Politics and (...)
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  26.  5
    Unsociable Sociability and the Crisis of Natural Law: Michael Hissmann on the State of Nature.Alexander Schmidt - 2015 - History of European Ideas 41 (5):619-639.
    SummaryThis article studies the impact of the debate about human sociability on the crisis of natural law in the later eighteenth century examining the Untersuchungen über den Stand der Natur of 1780 by the Göttingen scholar Michael Hissmann. It makes the case that this crisis ensued from Rousseau's Discours sur l‘inégalité and a revival of neo-Epicurean trends in moral philosophy more generally. The sociability debate revolved around the question to what extent society was natural or artificial to man. This (...)
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  27. Religious and Poetic Experience in the Thought of Michael Oakeshott.Glenn Worthington - 2005 - Imprint Academic.
    Much of the scholarly attention attracted by Michael Oakeshott's writings has focused upon his philosophical characterisation of the relations that constitute moral association in the modern world. A less noticed, but equally significant, aspect of Oakeshott’s moral philosophy is his account of the type of person required to enter into and enjoy moral association. Oakeshott’s best known characterisation of the persona best suited to moral association occurs in his identification of a 'morality of the individual’. The book argues (...)
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  28. Choice, Character, and Excuse*: MICHAEL S. MOORE.Michael S. Moore - 1990 - Social Philosophy and Policy 7 (2):29-58.
    Freud justified his extensive theorizing about dreams by the observation that they were “the royal road” to something much more general: namely, our unconscious mental life. The current preoccupation with the theory of excuse in criminal law scholarship can be given a similar justification, for the excuses are the royal road to theories of responsibility generally. The thought is that if we understand why we excuse in certain situations but not others, we will have also gained a much (...)
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  29. Contradictory Information: Too Much of a Good Thing. [REVIEW]J. Michael Dunn - 2010 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 39 (4):425 - 452.
    Both I and Belnap, motivated the "Belnap-Dunn 4-valued Logic" by talk of the reasoner being simply "told true" (T) and simply "told false" (F), which leaves the options of being neither "told true" nor "told false" (N), and being both "told true" and "told false" (B). Belnap motivated these notions by consideration of unstructured databases that allow for negative information as well as positive information (even when they conflict). We now experience this on a daily basis with the Web. But (...)
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  30.  58
    Missed It By That Much: Austin on Norms of Truth.Jeffrey Hershfield - 2012 - Philosophia 40 (2):357-363.
    A principal challenge for a deflationary theory is to explain the value of truth: why we aim for true beliefs, abhor dishonesty, and so on. The problem arises because deflationism sees truth as a mere logical property and the truth predicate as serving primarily as a device of generalization. Paul Horwich, attempts to show how deflationism can account for the value of truth. Drawing on the work of J. L. Austin, I argue that his account, which focuses on belief, cannot (...)
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  31.  24
    ‘If There is a God, Any Experience Which Seems to Be of God, Will Be Genuine’1: MICHAEL P. LEVINE.Michael P. Levine - 1990 - Religious Studies 26 (2):207-217.
    In The Existence of God Richard Swinburne argues that ‘if there is a God, any experience which seems to be of God, will be genuine – will be of God.’ On the face of it this claim of the essential veridicality of any religious experience, given the existence of God, is incredible. Consider what is being claimed by looking at a particularly dramatic example – but one that is well within the purview of Swinburne's claim. The ‘Yorkshire Ripper’ who murdered (...)
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  32.  15
    Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil: Michael Tanner.Michael Tanner - 1986 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 20:197-216.
    Although Nietzsche's greatness is recognized more universally now than ever before, the nature of that greatness is still widely misunderstood, and that unfortunately means that before I discuss any of Beyond Good and Evil in any detail, I must make some general remarks about his work, his development and the kind of way in which I think that it is best to read him. Unlike any of the other philosophers that this series includes, except Marx and Engels, Nietzsche is very (...)
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  33.  7
    De Animalibus: Michael Scot's Arabic-Latin Translation. Part Three, Books XV-XIX: Generation of Animals. [REVIEW]Michael W. Tkacz - 1995 - Review of Metaphysics 49 (1):119-120.
    Historians of philosophy often overlook the fact that the reception of Aristotle's works in the Latin West during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries was largely the reception of a natural science. More than half the corpus is devoted to such topics as zoology, animal psychology, atmospheric studies, cosmology, chemistry, and physical mechanics. A full quarter of the corpus is devoted to zoology alone. This point was well understood among the first generation of Latin commentators. Scholars such as Robert Grosseteste and (...)
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  34.  4
    De Animalibus: Michael Scot's Arabic-Latin Translation. Part Three, Books XV-XIX: Generation of Animals. [REVIEW]Michael W. Tkacz - 1995 - Review of Metaphysics 49 (1):119-120.
    Historians of philosophy often overlook the fact that the reception of Aristotle's works in the Latin West during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries was largely the reception of a natural science. More than half the corpus is devoted to such topics as zoology, animal psychology, atmospheric studies, cosmology, chemistry, and physical mechanics. A full quarter of the corpus is devoted to zoology alone. This point was well understood among the first generation of Latin commentators. Scholars such as Robert Grosseteste and (...)
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  35. So Much, so Fast, so Little Time: Coming to Terms with Rapid Change and its Consequences.Michael St Clair - 2011 - Praeger.
    Introduction and acknowledgments -- What is happening to us? and why? -- So much information is changing how we think -- Communication, entertainment, and over-stimulation -- Work : how it changes and how it changes us -- New behaviors and changes in manners -- Faster and faster time -- Families, women, and sex -- Making sense of contradictory social trends -- Conclusion.
     
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  36. Recognizing Tacit Knowledge in Medical Epistemology.Stephen G. Henry - 2006 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27 (3):187--213.
    The evidence-based medicine movement advocates basing all medical decisions on certain types of quantitative research data and has stimulated protracted controversy and debate since its inception. Evidence-based medicine presupposes an inaccurate and deficient view of medical knowledge. Michael Polanyi’s theory of tacit knowledge both explains this deficiency and suggests remedies for it. Polanyi shows how all explicit human knowledge depends on a wealth of tacit knowledge which accrues from experience and is essential for problem solving. Edmund Pellegrino’s classic treatment (...)
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  37. Skeptical Theism and the 'Too-Much-Skepticism' Objection.Michael C. Rea - 2013 - In Justin P. McBrayer & Daniel Howard-Snyder (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to the Problem of Evil. Wiley. pp. 482-506.
    In the first section, I characterize skeptical theism more fully. This is necessary in order to address some important misconceptions and mischaracterizations that appear in the essays by Maitzen, Wilks, and O’Connor. In the second section, I describe the most important objections they raise and group them into four “families” so as to facilitate an orderly series of responses. In the four sections that follow, I respond to the objections.
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  38.  40
    Much Ado About Eye Movements to Nothing: A Response to Ferreira Et Al.: Taking a New Look at Looking at Nothing.Daniel C. Richardson, Gerry T. M. Altmann, Michael J. Spivey & Merrit A. Hoover - 2009 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (6):235-236.
  39.  97
    Some Not-Much-Discussed Problems for Non-Cognitivism in Ethics.Michael Smith - 2001 - Ratio 14 (2):93–115.
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  40.  38
    Reconstructing the Cognitive World: The Next Step.Michael Wheeler - 2007 - Bradford.
    In _Reconstructing the Cognitive World_, Michael Wheeler argues that we should turn away from the generically Cartesian philosophical foundations of much contemporary cognitive science research and proposes instead a Heideggerian approach. Wheeler begins with an interpretation of Descartes. He defines Cartesian psychology as a conceptual framework of explanatory principles and shows how each of these principles is part of the deep assumptions of orthodox cognitive science. Wheeler then turns to Heidegger's radically non-Cartesian account of everyday cognition, which, he (...)
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  41. Civilian Immunity, Supreme Emergency, and Moral Disaster.Igor Primoratz - 2011 - The Journal of Ethics 15 (4):371-386.
    Any plausible position in the ethics of war and political violence in general will include the requirement of protection of civilians (non-combatants, common citizens) against lethal violence. This requirement is particularly prominent, and particularly strong, in just war theory. Some adherents of the theory see civilian immunity as absolute, not to be overridden in any circumstances whatsoever. Others allow that it may be overridden, but only in extremis. The latter position has been advanced by Michael Walzer under the heading (...)
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  42. Review of Michael Tye's Consciousness Revisited: Materialism Without Phenomenal Concepts. [REVIEW]Sam Coleman - 2010 - Philosophy 85 (3):413-418.
    Reading Tye’s new book reminded me of slowly sipping a good specimen of a dry vodka Martini. In both cases much is accomplished by the skilful assembly of only a few key ingredients. I don’t really like dry vodka Martinis, though, and similarly I found many of the thoughts offered by Consciousness Revisited to be too bitter to swallow. A sophisticated piece of work, however, it certainly is.
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  43.  10
    On Where We Differ: Sites Versus Grounds of Justice, and Some Other Reflections on Michael Blake’s Justice and Foreign Policy.Mathias Risse - 2016 - Law and Philosophy 35 (3):251-270.
    Blake’s book conveys a straightforward directive: the foreign policy of liberal states should be guided and constrained by the goal of helping other states to become liberal democracies as well. This much is what we owe to people in other countries—this much but nothing more. The primary addressees are wealthier democracies, whose foreign policy ought to be guided by the idea of equality of all human beings. My approach in On Global Justice bears important similarities to Blake’s, but (...)
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  44.  17
    Political Utopias: Contemporary Debates Ed. By Michael Weber, Kevin Vallier.Mark Stephen Jendrysik - 2019 - Utopian Studies 29 (3):429-433.
    The question of the true nature of justice, whether as a conventional product of human action and human limitations or as a universal ideal, is one that has inspired philosophical debate since Plato. In this volume a number of scholars wrestle with this question. They ask whether justice should be utopian, focused solely on the ideal, or whether just must be realist, taking into account the constraints of contemporary human existence. As the editors note in their introduction, it should come (...)
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  45. In a State of Pain.Paul Noordhof - 2005 - In Murat Aydede (ed.), Pain: New Essays on its Nature and the Methodology of its Study. Cambridge Ma: Bradford Book/Mit Press.
    Michael Tye and I are both Representationalists. Nevertheless, we have managed to disagree about the semantic character of ‘in’ in ‘There is a pain in my fingertip’ (see Noordhof (2001); Tye (2002); Noordhof (2002)). The first section of my commentary will focus on this disagreement. I will then turn to the location of pain. Here, perhaps somewhat surprisingly, there seems to be much more agreement between Tye and me. I restrict myself to three points. First, I argue that (...)
     
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  46. Torture Warrants and Democratic States: Dirty Hands in an Age of Terror.Paul Lauritzen - 2010 - Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (1):93-112.
    In the aftermath of September 11, 2001, policy makers and others have debated the question of whether or not the United States should torture in an effort to prevent terrorist attacks. In a series of controversial essays, the legal theorist Alan Dershowitz argues that, if a democratic society is going to torture, it should at least be done under the cover of law. To that end, he recommends establishing a legal mechanism by which a judge could issue torture warrants—much (...)
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  47. What is It Like to Affect the Past?Rebecca Roache - 2015 - Topoi 34 (1):195-199.
    Michael Dummett argued that, whilst we can imagine circumstances under which agents may rationally believe themselves capable of affecting the past, the attitude of such agents is bound to seem ‘paradoxical and unnatural to us’. Therefore, only agents very unlike us could intentionally affect the past. I argue that this is not the case. I outline circumstances in which the attitude of such agents is prudent, even by our own standards. Worlds in which backwards causation occurs could, then, contain (...)
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  48.  50
    Book Review The Way of Ayurvedic Herbs by Karta Purkh Singh Khalsa and Michael Tierra. [REVIEW]Swami Narasimhananda - 2013 - Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 118 (11):649-50.
    This book contains some valuable appendices that present a synopsis of therapies, a list of vegetable juices helpful in detoxification, and even recipes of some Ayurvedic delicacies! A glossary clarifies technical terms and the bibliography, index, and endnotes make the work useful for serious students, practitioners, and researchers. With so much information packed in a compact volume, it truly is ‘the most complete guide to natural healing and health with traditional Ayurvedic herbalism’, as the subtitle of the book claims. (...)
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  49. Hume's Alleged Success Over Hutcheson.Noriaki Iwasa - 2011 - Synthesis Philosophica 26 (2):323-336.
    David Hume thinks that human affections are naturally partial, while Francis Hutcheson holds that humans originally have disinterested benevolence. Michael Gill argues that Hume's moral theory succeeds over Hutcheson's because the former severs the link between explaining and justifying morality. According to Gill, Hutcheson is wrong to assume that our original nature should be the basis of morality. Gill's understanding of Hutcheson's theory does not fully represent it, since for Hutcheson self-love and self-interest under certain conditions are permissible, or (...)
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    State Variation in SCHIP Allocations: How Much is There, What Are its Sources, and Can It Be Reduced?Michael Davern, Lynn A. Blewett, Boris Bershadsky, Kathleen Thiede Call & Todd Rockwood - 2003 - Inquiry: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing 40 (2):184-197.
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